Nitrogen Inflation

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  #1  
Old 10-20-12, 06:37 AM
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Nitrogen Inflation

How do I increase the pressure in nitrogen-inflated tires?

Is this a DIY operation or must I have it done at the dealer?
 
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Old 10-20-12, 07:45 AM
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Depends. If you want to maintain the 100% N2, have to use a nitrogen station. If you don't care, just air as usual; the atmosphere is 78% nitrogen.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 08:06 AM
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Had occasion to be in the pits at the Indy 500 and saw some odd colored gas tanks. I asked one of the pit crew what they were and he said they were nitrogen tanks for operating their air tools that it expanded faster than compressed air. Has noting to do with subject but I thought interesting.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 08:27 AM
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Yeah, I personally feel that filling tires with 100% N[sub]2[/sub] is a borderline scam. When ambient air is very predominately mostly Nitrogen to begin with I don't see enough of a benefit to spend money to make it more pure.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 08:33 AM
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It was long known in the trucking industry that when a fully loaded long haul truck was operated at high speeds tire pressure would increase.
This was allowed for in the construction of the tire but the increased pressure changed the profile of the tread that was in contact with the pavement and increased wear.
By using nitrogen instead of air in heavy truck tires when the temperature of the tire increased the pressure only went up a miniscule amount saving wear on the tires and thousands of dollars a year in replacements.

Move forward twenty years or so and some enterprising company started marketing this to personal vehicles whose tires do not behave like those on a heavy hauling vehicle.........pure genius IMO.

Sorry for the mini-rant but my belief is that if you dump the nitrogen you could buy a nice little compressor for what you would spend on having to N2 them up.
Just make sure all tires use the same gas.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 08:55 AM
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I'm with Greg - while is some minor benefit to 100% nitrogen, it's nowhere near what you have to pay to have this done.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 09:00 AM
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Add Air?

So, does this mean I can just add air and all is well?
 
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Old 10-20-12, 09:05 AM
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You can, but you will no longer have 100% nitrogen. As stated, regular air is 78% nitrogen already (21% oxygen and all other gases present make up the last 1%).
 
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Old 10-20-12, 09:18 AM
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Nitrogen

Thanks to all for your help. I will just add air.
 
  #10  
Old 10-20-12, 09:31 AM
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I will just add air.
My suggestion would be to either go with the program and add N2 or drain the tires and add air to all of them then change the caps if you have green ones.

Although I believe there is almost no benefit for N2 to be in personal vehicles it has different characteristics than just air.
You could wind up with slightly different tire pressure during extended highway trips in hot weather.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 12:53 PM
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No need to "drain" the nitrogen that's in the tires now, just top it up with air and replace the caps with normal black ones.
 
  #12  
Old 10-25-12, 04:09 PM
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Purchased 4 Michelin MXV's at Costco the summer before last because of a good sale and the installer tech said that they used nitrogen at no extra charge and any time I wanted to I could return and they would check the tires no charge. And he also said I could just use regular compressed air as everybody above has explained. I went back on two occasions but you have to wait because they needed to bring the car into the service bay to access their filler hoses.

That got old real quick and after checking the tires myself the next morning after the car sat all night and the tires were cold and I found 2 lb.and 3lb. difference in 2 tires I just went back to adding air with my compressor. I use a good quality air gauge that I got from Summit because I found those cheap pocket pencil types to be all over the place with their readings.
 
  #13  
Old 10-26-12, 07:29 AM
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Nitrogen in a personal vehicle can help under some conditions, but that can also be over come easily.
In my case, I commute 50 miles a day, 90% at hwy speeds (60-75mph). In our van, tire tempurature can change the pressure from 2-5PSI a tire from cold to hot (maybe a bit more during the winter). My car, I've seen as high as 13PSI change from cold to hot on the same drive.

Nitrogen could reduce this amount of change a bit, but is potentially more expensive and a PITA.

Alternatively, I simply set my tire pressure so when hot, it's just a hair below my tire's rated max (~2PSI). This way, cold, I'm still within proper pressure range.
 
  #14  
Old 10-26-12, 11:04 AM
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Does the tire shop hook the valve to vacuum and suck out all that ordinary air? If not, then what's the point to "filling" with pure N2 when 1/2 the volume is impure air.

Just another way of looking at the scam....
 
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