Tire appearance between front and rear.

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  #1  
Old 04-02-13, 01:42 PM
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Tire appearance between front and rear.

Is it normal for front tires on a FWD car to appear under-inflated compared to the rear...even though the pressures are to spec and equal? Never seemed to notice it before...but it's pretty apparent on my new Hercules. Very nice tires btw...at least for handling and noise levels, esp for LRR tires. We'll have to see how long they last...but with my mileage, I'll probably replace just from age before they wear out.

Also, is it true that tire care products (like low gloss ArmorAll....not the glossy wet look "tire shine" stuff) can actually degrade the tires? I saw a lot of comments in various places that it can....but just as many saying a protectant is a good thing.

That was one of the problems with the old ones...the sun out here just ate them up...that and several occurrences of low pressure before I found the defective valve stems.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 04-02-13 at 02:07 PM.
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Old 04-02-13, 04:52 PM
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I've never been big on the factory air pressure specs. Often it's too low and results in the outer sides of the tire wearing out leaving good tread in the middle. If your previous tires wore fairly even at the pressure you have in the new ones - I'd think you are good to go. If your old tires wore considerably more on the outside edges - I'd increase the psi.

Don't know for sure but less plys on the sidewall might make a tire look softer.
 
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Old 04-02-13, 08:02 PM
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Yes, as you have engine load on fronts.
Not sure on Armorall, but I know that TireFlat does. Also, unbalances tires to the point of them not being able to be balanced, due to lose chunk of material flying inside.
 
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Old 04-02-13, 08:03 PM
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Oh, not to forget. Simple glycerine works great on rubber.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 08:50 AM
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I tend to adjust the air pressure so the wear is even. I had mine too high for a while and backed it off a bit when I noticed they were wearing more in the center. My current car calls for 34 psi on all four corners, which is the highest I've seen, usually past cars were 32. That said, I tend to keep them at 36.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 09:01 AM
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Thanks all....

Mark...yeah that's pretty much how the fronts wore out....but likely because I never rotated them like I should have. That and the bad stems. The rears were pretty even, but the fronts were slicks on the outside edges. Even had steel showing through a gouge I had.

I always went to spec on my RWD cars/trucks and never had an issue. I go a few pounds higher on this FWD one.

That said...kid at the tire store said my wifes SUV was underinflated when I had them rotated. I said..."really? I just checked them yesterday". He says..."Oh, you should run those at 45 lbs". Of course that's the max inflation listed on the sidewall and would make the thing drive like a pogo stick.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 11:14 AM
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It also matters what the tires are rated for, load-wise. My guess is that in an attempt to compromise, the factory-spec fronts are right at the load limit, so that the rears are way underloaded and don't deform much.

My wife's '01 Integra always looks underinflated in front. It's kind of annoying, but the handling is OK. the only headache about it is that she once had a couple of nails in the fronts with very slow leaks, and because we were used to the tires being low, we didn't pay it much heed, and I found the issue when pulling the wheels off to do brakes.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 12:49 PM
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Well they are 1356 lb load rating, higher than the Kuhmo's they replaced. Maybe I just didn't notice the old ones were doing the same thing because they were more worn on the outside tread?

Btw..this is an inline 6 and the car weighs about 3300, so I'm guessing prob 60% of the weight is on the front?

Oh...Suzuki Verona...not that it matters.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 06:30 PM
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That said...kid at the tire store said my wifes SUV was underinflated when I had them rotated. I said..."really? I just checked them yesterday". He says..."Oh, you should run those at 45 lbs". Of course that's the max inflation listed on the sidewall and would make the thing drive like a pogo stick.
Gotta love those kids, every tire shop has one. I usually run 1 to 2 psi above the auto manufacturer's recommended pressures, but never exceed the maximum pressure printed on the side of the tire. A little extra pressure will also slightly increase your fuel mileage.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 07:19 PM
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Me being owner of a hybrid vehicle, tire pressure is super important, as mpg goes up as you pump them up.
But I never over inflate tires. I tried. Lord save.
My final strategy on this is - it is not worth bumpy ride and worn out suspension components. Says 36 psi on door jam sticker - 36 it is. Some guys in Hybrid forum I belong to, pump same tires to 50 and above, to chase a mile or 2 extra. Not me.
 
  #11  
Old 04-06-13, 08:22 PM
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I agree with Marksr. My car says 30psi, but oem tires are 40 max psi. The tires I buy are 44 max. I fill my tires to about 35psi.

I've also had the kid at the tire store inflate my tires to max psi when I bought them.

ETA: Didn't realize this was a slow forum and I was posting in a 3 day old thread....
 
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Old 04-07-13, 05:20 AM
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This isn't a slow forum although some of us members are from time to time

It's a whole lot better to reply to a thread that has been inactive for a few days than a few years
 
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Old 04-08-13, 08:37 AM
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It's a whole lot better to reply to a thread that has been inactive for a few days than a few years
I'm gonna make a lot of money when I make software patches for popular forum software that sanity check that...

"This discussion is four years old and hasn't been posted to in three years, and the original user hasn't been seen in two and a half years. Are you really, really sure that you want to reply to this? Y / N:"
 
  #14  
Old 04-08-13, 08:57 AM
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I've never followed the rating on the inside of the driver's door.
I've always tried to be close to the tire manufacture's max when the tires are hot.
When checking/filling in the summer, I'll go with ~3-5PSI less then max when the tires are cold. Winter is 5-7PSI.
On long trips, I'll check and adjust the tire pressure after an hour or so on the hwy. The tires should be warm/hot by then, and I'll be able to get closer to the suggested max.

The tire type and material make a huge difference on expansion. My summer car for example, will swing almost 10 PSI during the spring/fall while hwy running where the van is 3-5PSI.
I'm running (until next week) Goodyear Eagle RSA tires on the car, and Goodyear Assurance Tripletreds on the van (great all around tires btw).
 
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