DIY - painting car's hood

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  #1  
Old 07-06-13, 01:26 PM
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DIY - painting car's hood

My daughter's 1996 Corolla has a flat black(primer maybe) hood from Certifit that looks terrible now. We want to paint it with some sort of black paint. What do you recommend we use? We have no sprayer or compressor, so it needs to be brushed on or in spray cans. Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-06-13, 01:37 PM
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It's all but impossible to get a satisfactory job on a hood with a brush or roller. Spray cans can be problematic because of the small amount of thin paint in each can. To get a nice looking job you need to keep a wet edge with the paint being applied - the small nozzle and awkwardness of a spray can complicates it's use. Some spray cans have a fan tip instead of the normal round nozzle - the fan tip gives a lot better control!

The hood will need to be wet sanded with 320 or finer grit sandpaper. This both helps to remove any impurities in the surface and provide for good adhesion.

Have you priced getting the hood sprayed professionally? have a friend or acquaintance that has an air compressor and gun?
 
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Old 07-06-13, 01:38 PM
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Just how good do you want it to look and how long does it need to hold up?
I'd just take it to a real body shop, even a cheap place like Maco if your on a budget would look better then trying to do it by hand or spray cans.
 
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Old 07-06-13, 01:52 PM
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A guy I knew in high school painted an entire car with rattle cans and it looked spectacular when it was done. Way too tedious for me but it can be done. That said, wouldn't hurt to get an estimate from Maaco.
 
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Old 07-06-13, 01:59 PM
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I've only seen one car painted completely with aerosol cans that looked good. It was somewhat of a kit car with an after market T bucket fiberglass body. No hood, fenders or doors, if I remember correctly he told me it took something like 27 cans to paint it.

A decent job can be had with rattle cans but it's not near as quick or easy as using the right equipment!
 
  #6  
Old 07-06-13, 03:01 PM
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Painting hood

Thanks guys, but we want to DIY. Believe me, if we use a brush or spray cans, it will look much better than it does now. If we don't do the wet sanding, will the paint not adhere properly? I was hoping to just wash it good, and paint. Does the paint need to be some sort of heat resistant paint? I want to go to Home Depot to buy something.
 
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Old 07-07-13, 04:10 AM
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Wet sanding isn't a big deal. All you'll need is 1 sheet of wet/dry paper - it's black sandpaper and will state on the back that it's for wet or dry sanding. Running a little water over the hood as you sand lubricates and cleans the sandpaper. Dry sanding tends to leave heavier scratch marks and takes more sandpaper. It's possible wiping the hood down with preprite or a liquid deglosser will suffice but really can't say without inspecting the hood.

No need for heat resistant paint - the hood won't get that hot. An automotive store would be a better place to buy the paint. I don't know a lot about HD selection of spray cans but some of the cheaper spray paints are bad to fade with repeated exposure to sunlight.
 
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Old 07-07-13, 10:47 AM
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Thanks. I've got an Advance Auto and Napa near me. Will either have what I need?
 
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Old 07-07-13, 11:00 AM
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I know this may sound kinda stupid...but I'll throw it out anyway.

What about a spray or roll-on bedliner/undercoating? Sure...it won't be shiny or smooth...but it would be different.....
 
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Old 07-07-13, 12:45 PM
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Both Advance and NAPA should have automotive spray paint.
 
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Old 07-07-13, 01:45 PM
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Thanks. What grit sandpaper. 300, 600? Does anyone know of a good link that shows the steps to do this properly?
 
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Old 07-08-13, 03:36 AM
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The hood will need to be wet sanded with 320 or finer grit sandpaper.


If you use a coarser grit you run the risk of the sanding scratches showing thru the finish. A lot depends on the condition of the metal/paint being sanded. Fine grit can be slow or ineffective over rough areas - sometimes you need to start out with a coarser grit and work up to the fine. I wouldn't bother with any sanding finer than 400 grit for the type of paint job you propose.
 
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Old 07-08-13, 05:17 AM
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I've personally done rattle can auto painting. I would highly recommend some practice before doing the real thing. I did a rear bumper cover on my 2001 neon as my first big piece (did some repair work after someone hit the corner of it at my wife's work).

If you do not know what type of paint or finish is on the car, start with priming.
Remove the hood.
Wet sand the existing finish with 250 or 300 grit. wash with water, then use 300-400grit if any imperfections still exist. Nows a good time to fill any stone chips.
Wash and let dry.
Prime hood using an Automotive primer. Locally, it cost us (I think) ~$6 a can for decent automotive primer. Took a can and a bit to do a full Neon rear bumper cover, so expect 2 cans, but have 3 or 4 total on hand. What you don't use can be returned.
Allow dry.
Wet sand primer with 400-500 grit.
Rinse and dry.
Paint time!!
Do light coats and keep moving. Rattle cans (and spray guns) should be a left to right and back sweep. Over spray the part (protect the surrounding areas) so that you get even coverage edge to edge. You should see a perfect outline of the hood on your work space when remove it.
Allow first coat to dry to tackiness (follow paint instructions), then do your second coat. Depending on paint and desired finish, 2-3 coats
Allow to dry/cure.
Wet Sand with 1000grit, rinse with clean water only (no rubbing), allow dry then clear.
Clear coat... Same as paint. I'll generally do 3 coats of clear.

For show room finish, after the clear coat drys, use 2000 grit wet sand to smoothen out the clear. Wait 2+ days before hitting with buffer and wax.

If you are looking for a quick and dirty job, you can get paint mixed with clear.

For paint, I strongly recommend getting the rattle cans mixed to order. The color match stuff that sits on the shelf for who knows how long.... may differ a bit between cans in color, age and paint quality.

If you want a realy quick and dirty paint job, I've heard of folks using that Plasti Dip paint.
 
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Old 07-08-13, 10:27 AM
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Paint

Thanks very much Mike. I have no idea how to remove the hood though.
 
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Old 07-08-13, 11:59 AM
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Generally there are 4-8 bolts holding the hood to the hinges. It is important to put the hood back on in the exact same place or it will be out of adjustment. It isn't a big deal to adjust a hood but if you've never done it, it might be better to paint it in place.

I think Mike misspoke when he said some paints come with the clear in it. Today there are basically there are 2 types of automotive paints, an acrylic enamel which doesn't need a clear coat and a base coat/clear coat system which basically has the color in one can and the shine in the other. Enamel goes on shiny and is a one step process. Clear coats have the base coat [color] applied and the have a clear shiny coat applied over it. Clear coat is somewhat similar to enamel paint but without any pigment.
 
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Old 07-08-13, 03:04 PM
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Thanks. When I wet sand the hood, do I use a circular motion or a straight line motion? If I use acrylic enamel, do I sand between coats, or after the final coat?
 
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Old 07-09-13, 03:39 AM
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It doesn't really matter what directions you go when wet sanding. The main thing is to sand it all. The water makes the sandpaper glide easily over the surface. If you prime the hood, you'd wet sand before and after [I'd use 220 before and 400 grit over the primer] The actual paint doesn't normally get sanded. Each coat is applied before the previous coat has had time to dry. The solvents in the paint 'melt' the underlying tacky coat to make for a good bond.

If you decide it needs another coat after the paint has dried you need to wet sand. When there is a lot of orange peel in the paint, the finish can be wet sanded smooth with an ultra fine sandpaper [1000-1500 grit] Care must be used because if you sand too deep, you'll remove too much of the color and you'd have to start over.

Judging by your original post and comments in post #6, you are probably over thinking it. Wet sanding it [prime if there is any raw metal] wiping it down with preprite [paint thinner would probably be ok] and spraying multiple coats of finish should get the results you are looking for.
 
  #18  
Old 07-09-13, 08:11 PM
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Paint

Well, I finished the painting of hood, and I can see stripes in the paint. So far it's dried about 5 hours. I assume it won't look any better tomorrow, correct? Is there anything I can do to improve it? Thanks.
 
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Old 07-10-13, 03:42 AM
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You didn't get enough paint on the hood you'll need to wet sand and apply more paint. Rattle cans can be problematic because they don't put out a lot of paint. While I wouldn't have any problems getting a nice looking spray job with a gun, I'm not sure I could say the same if I had to use aerosol cans.

When you apply the paint it needs to be wet all the way across. Any dry spots while wet will cause the striping. It's possible to use 1000+ grit sandpaper and wet sand minor blemishes away but I doubt you have enough paint on the hood for that to be an option.
 
  #20  
Old 07-10-13, 09:36 AM
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Thanks Marksr. So I should wet sand the whole hood with a 1000 grit? What am I looking for when I wet sand? Am I actually removing paint or what? It probably would have looked better if I brushed the paint on. Is there any reason to use a clear coat after I paint? I used Rustoleum gloss.
 
  #21  
Old 07-10-13, 09:44 AM
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If you think the paint is thick enough where you can sand off some to make it even, then wet sand [polish] it with 1000 grit. I suspect you probably didn't get enough paint on the hood [hard to do with rattle cans] and it that case it would be better to sand with 400 grit [to promote adhesion] and repaint.

Enamel paints don't require a clear coat although I don't know how well rustoleum will weather ..... or if the clear coats are compatible with it.
 
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