Wheel Balancing

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  #1  
Old 10-28-13, 05:49 PM
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Wheel Balancing

Hello out there, I have a bubble wheel balancer and don't know why I am supposed to level the base before I start to balance. The base houses the top part or the bubble unit. This part ''floats'' when the lever is pushed and when the wheel/tire is on it the bubble moves to show the heavy/light side of the unit you are balancing. If the top unit ''floats'' why does the base need to be adjusted level to start with ? The bubble shows level no matter where the base sits. I guess ??!!
Any old timers out there with the answer ....Thanks.
 
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Old 10-28-13, 06:13 PM
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Because the top part only floats so much...If the base is way off then the top dont work right...Bottoms out on one side...
 
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Old 10-28-13, 06:14 PM
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I don't know for sure, but have wondered the same thing at different times, and have always assumed that it had more to do with keeping the weight straight down on the stem, in order to avoid bending it over time, than it does with the balance of the tire and wheel. I assume that yours is a newer one, but mine is probably 50 years old or so, still works fine, and the instructions for it say the same thing. No big deal though, because my shop floor is pretty flat, so I have only adjusted the base a couple of times over the years, and even then it only take a minute or so.
 
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Old 10-28-13, 06:29 PM
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Any old timers out there with the answer
Old Timer lawrosa has it right.

lawrosa

Because the top part only floats so much...If the base is way off then the top dont work right...Bottoms out on one side...
Bubble balancers were quite popular 40 to 50 years ago because of cost, but they are too slow and not accurate enough today although if you take your time and are very precise with what you are doing, you can still do a respectable job with one.
 
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Old 10-29-13, 09:10 AM
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Wheel balaner

Thanks there ''Old Timer'' Lawrosa
I have been adjusting the base, setting the bubble top up to float without a wheel and fine tuning the adjustment then. Set the bubble part down and put the wheel/tire on it and set the handle that the wheel/tire floats. Then I do the balance. Had to find out what thoughts on my original question were out there to satisfy my own thoughts though. I was assuming what you say so I guess it's correct. After all.....we both can't be wrong ! By the way Pedro, this one is from the garage I used to work at back in 1965-6. I just refinished it so it would look better. Way, way better than it did. It does a better job too. Just like how our cars seem to drive better after a good wash.
Thanks again.
 
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Old 10-29-13, 09:13 AM
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Nothing beats the high speed balancers of today... The bubble type should be in a museum is all IMO... LOL..

Old timer at 47...geesh!!!!
 
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Old 10-29-13, 09:40 AM
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Mike, if you're an old timer - what does that make some of the rest of us?
 
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Old 10-29-13, 01:42 PM
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The shortcomming of a bubble balancer is there is no way to tell which side of the wheel to p
ut the weight on (dynamic balance) And no they dont have to be perfectly verticle, just close. As for old timers,,,I started a year before chev. had a V8.
 
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Old 11-17-13, 10:53 AM
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I couldn't imagine using a bubble balancer even for home use let alone in a commercial setting today. Maybe if you don't drive over 40mph they do an adequate job. I have a SnapOn hand crank spin balancer that I only use maybe on 4-6 tires a month average. Bought it used 15 years ago and paid for itself in balance costs alone but the time to take tires to a shop as well. Especially since I use stick-on weights mounted on the inside of the wheel most of the time and which shops charge even more for.
 
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