2008 cobalt wheel bearing

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-15-14, 11:19 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 3
2008 cobalt wheel bearing

I'm totally new to automotive, but I really want to learn how to do my own repairs and maintenance. I have a stock 2008 chevy cobalt LS coupe. 2.2L. during my last inspection the mechanic mentioned that my wheel bearing is starting to wear out, and I assume it's the "whum whum whum whum" sound that's coming from my front end. It sounds worse when turning to the right which indicates that it is the left front wheel bearing. what I am trying to figure out is what kind of bearing it is, what style, and what tools I will need to do it myself. Also an Idea as to how much time it will take. (it's my only vehicle so I don't have a backup) Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-15-14, 11:46 AM
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Canada (near The Motor City)
Posts: 611
Let me google that for you

Youtube and Google are your friend.
 
  #3  
Old 03-15-14, 01:04 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: canada
Posts: 5
Its about 1-1.5 hrs for someone doing it the first time, you will need a metric 1/2" drive set, either a 30, 32, 34 or 36 mm socket for the axle hub nut, and a torque wrench. I recommend a new axle hub nut when installing, when you tighten it, finish the final torque by hand, dont go full out and bottom it out with the impact gun. Otherwise the new bearing may not last.
To make sure youre changing the right one, spin tbe wheel and grab the spring, youll feel the bad bearing through the spring.
Now is a good time to service/inspect the brakes, make sure the sliders arent siezed and the pads arent seized in the caliper bracket.
Good luck
 
  #4  
Old 03-15-14, 02:16 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,991
It would also be a good idea to invest in a repair manual for your vehicle
 
  #5  
Old 03-15-14, 02:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 3
Some good info. I did in fact google it, that's how I found this site haha. But wording is everything and what you searched for brought up some sites I didn't see before with good information. Hopefully my mechanic buddy will let me work in his garage. I just need to find the right bearing for my car which doesn't have ABS, so it may be a slightly different model than the ones I have found so far.
 
  #6  
Old 03-15-14, 05:17 PM
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Canada (near The Motor City)
Posts: 611
2008 Chevrolet Cobalt LS Sedan Ratings, Prices, Trims, Summary | J.D. Power

J.D. Power says that ABS is standard in 2008
 
  #7  
Old 03-15-14, 05:57 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,301
If you want to get into DIY repairs, which is very manly, noble, and $$$ saving idea, look into opening Alldata account. It's only $40 per vehicle per 5 years and $25 additional car. Overall, it's basically cheaper than buying repair manual.
Also, strike online account with Autozone. They have very decent repair guides online. Autozone owns alldata anyway, so it comes along fine.
Keep in mind, breaking center nut without power tools is VERY hard. Impact wrench is best choice. Then it has to be torqued back to spec. You may want to invest into a good cordless impact, 24 V, as those are said to be do anything things. I have 96 gall compressor and 1200 lbs ft impact wrench for that.
 
  #8  
Old 03-15-14, 06:58 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 3
I know it does. but I most assuredly do not have ABS. When I stomp the brakes it does not rumble. it locks up. Sure as the sun is hot.
 
  #9  
Old 03-16-14, 01:54 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 699
Either go for the electronic service ( I have not tried that , yet ) or buy a Chiltons or Hayns book .

I have not worked on a Cobalt , but the GM FWD cars I have worked on , I used a big ratchet & socket to remove the axle nut . And about a 10' cheater pipe . Sometimes I still had to jump up and down on the cheater pipe ! :-(

Invest in a hydraulic floor jack and jack stands . And be safe !

The first few repairs you do , the cost of the tooling will kick up the total cost of the project . But if you take care of your tools , they may last your lifetime . And over time , you will accumulate more tools and have to buy fewer tools for each repair project .

At my age , I do not figure I will wear out any new tools I buy , so I shop at Harbor Freight , first . Others may disagree .

God bless
Wyr
 
  #10  
Old 03-16-14, 04:54 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,991
HF has both cheap and decent quality tools .... and for the most part you can tell which ones are too cheap to bother with. I bought an pneumatic impact from them for $10-12 some 30 yrs ago and it works just as well today as it did when new. I kind of wish it would wear out so I could justify buying a better one as mine only has 240 lbs of torque. I've never had any issues with their impact sockets or wrenches.
 
  #11  
Old 03-16-14, 12:16 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,301
I returned HF impact wrench and grinder after 1 day of use. Gutless. And I have 96 gall compressor, MORE than adequate. Buddy gave me old Ingersol impact wrench. Beast.
Reason I mentioned 24 or 32 V impact, is that he has to fork up front for expensive tool, but won't have to fork for adequate compressor. Also, can take it anywhere. And impact wrench is handy for lifetime of tree shade mech.
10"" pipe, hah.... Yeah, I used to jump on those too. You know what happens when your feet slide off it? Or, ratchet slides off nut? Or you have nut like I had on our 94 Corolla? When you lift entire front end up and it won't budge? Also, who's gonna hold the brakes for you to prevent wheel from spin?
Impact wrench - boom, done.
 
  #12  
Old 03-17-14, 01:59 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 699
You leave the car on the ground with wheel in place , to hold the wheel . Chock the front and back of the tire , if needed .

After the axle nut is loose , then you jack the car up and remove the wheel .

Yes , you have to be careful when jumping on the 10 foot cheater pipe .

Poor folks have poor ways .

God bless
Wyr
 
  #13  
Old 03-17-14, 04:29 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,571
Or find a friendly garage that will break it loose with an impact gun, then re-tighten enough to be safe to get it home.
 
  #14  
Old 03-20-14, 12:48 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 58
the rythmic hum sound could be from your tires as well. how old are they? in good condition? do you rotate them frequently?
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes