DIY camber

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  #1  
Old 04-10-15, 01:48 PM
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DIY camber

OK, Q to those of you here who had camber done themselves.
Anywhere I looked, camber gauge is set on rotor, with rotor being locked to the hub with whatever. Lug nuts or else, so that it sits flush.
Of course, vehicle is up on a lift and wheels off. Camber is set and everything tightened.
I had this done several times on my Camry by now, with camber bolts, as Toyota wisely did no provisions for camber adjustments.
Thing is, according to spec, camber is "negative 0". SO I have it all set nice and neat with gauge on secured rotor, put everything back together - and voila, end up with about 4 degrees negative camber on wheels with car sitting on the floor.
Why? Problem is, I do not have a gauge that can be set on the rim itself and my lift will not permit me to adjust camber with wheels on, as they are not supported when car is lifted up.
I sort of have to fudge it to slightly positive camber based on rotor position to end up with slightly negative camber with wheels on the ground. And it's guesswork.
 
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Old 04-10-15, 02:06 PM
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I'm following your predicament, but I can't see how they expect you to read camber with the suspension hanging. And without turning angle gauges to allow the tires to slide into the right position when you put the weight on them, seems like you're going to have to at least drive forward and back a little to shimmy the tires into their normal orientation. Seems to me that the older ones had a large magnet that would grab the hub once you removed the grease caps, or, if that didn't work, you could stick it to a clamp that grabbed the rim. I think the closest that you're going to get it with the wheels off is to load the suspension by setting the lower control arms or whatever that vehicle has down on stands, so that the rotors are at the angle they would be going down the road.
 
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Old 04-10-15, 06:56 PM
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Ahhh, loading CAs is a good idea. Makes sense. Lift car via CAs and make sure it's level. I can do that.
Yes, there is even a vid on Youtube with wheels removed and hubs hanging down.
Well, she goes to alignment shop tomorrow anyway. I was more curious.
Go to second 32 here. It's a hanging hub, right? As that's the camber bolts I have.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sr6rc3RH6Q
 
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Old 04-11-15, 05:50 AM
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Okay, makes sense now. The device that mounts on the rotor is used to measure the angle of change, not the actual camber angle. Not shown in the video is the first step of the alignment process, which is to mount the wheel sensors, adjust the tire pressure, make the caster sweeps, etc., and take the caster, camber, and toe readings as they are at that point. So the video starts with all of that done, and now he is ready to make adjustments, and the wheel is raised from the rack in order to remove the instrumentation and gain access to the adjustment points. Much easier to make a lot of adjustments with the wheel out of the way and the suspension relaxed. So obviously just making this up as an example, but say the camber for that vehicle is supposed to be +5 degrees, and his readings say the camber on this wheel is -2 degrees, which means he has to bring the top of the wheel out 7 degrees. The wheel and rotor run down the road at the same angle, so if the wheel needs to be adjusted out 7 degrees the rotor needs to be adjusted out 7 degrees. So he sticks that bubble gauge to the rotor, zeroes it, and with minimal weight to move, adjusts the top out 7 degrees. So the device should work fine, but the key is that you still need to know what the angle is to start with and what it is supposed to be.
 
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Old 04-11-15, 06:25 AM
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Makes sense, thank you. Mine is (-)0. It's a 10th of degree negative. The spec. Basically vertical. So I need to measure what angle I have with free hanging hub - and I have inclinometer for that - and then basically set hub to positive camber less that spec and then when loaded, it all should find itself where it's supposed to be? See, he can adjust camber later with wheels sitting on the lift, I can't. My scissor lift has wheels hanging off it. So I need to re-think how to load the axle.
Truly, I do not mind having alignment done at the shop. But it became the principle - to DIY it. You know what I mean.
 
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Old 04-11-15, 06:35 AM
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Correction. I need to measure what wheel angle is loaded - and it is negative 4 right now - then lift the car, and reduce negative camber on the hub to positive 3.5 or so. So loaded, it should land at slight negative.
Right?
 
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Old 04-11-15, 11:51 AM
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If you measure the angle with the tires on the ground, just as it goes down the road, and determine that it needs to change 4 degrees, then you would raise it, remove the wheel, and move it 4 degrees. As long as you have it setting as it rolls down the road, that is the amount of change that you need to make. No other compensation required. The only thing you need to do is make sure that the tires are setting on the ground the way that they will run down the road. For example, as you know, when you let a vehicle down from a lift, the tires may be leaning in or out a bit, and will straighten up once it gets in motion and things straighten out. That's part of what the turning angle gauges compensate for, but you can probably get close enough by bouncing the vehicle a bit.
 
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Old 04-11-15, 01:28 PM
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Yes, I think I have it by now. Basically for my car, camber bolt has to be set to positive camber measured on the rotor, as when suspension is loaded, entire wheel goes towards negative camber.
But she's done anyway. I am glad I learned how to do it right next time.
Thank you.
 
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