service interval for disc brakes 2012 CRV

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  #1  
Old 07-01-15, 04:12 PM
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service interval for disc brakes 2012 CRV

Last visit to dealer, 29,000 miles, for a warranty replacement rear wheel bearing and they called the wife and said it needed all 4 brake assemblies cleaned as they were rubbing ?? I went with her when she picked it up and he explained road grime, yada, yada, would accumulate and needed to be cleaned every 15,000 miles at a cost of $59.95.

Never heard of disc brakes needing that TLC but didn't want to embarrass the wife for saying ok to the work. They say they did replace the wheel bearing and there was a noise back there, gone now. But my "snow job" meter was registering rather high with the needed brake cleaning. Plus, if it is on their periodic service list, what does this actually entail, on the lift with an air hose, or something more substantial?

Bud
 
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  #2  
Old 07-01-15, 08:53 PM
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Its not on Honda maintenance list. They are Dairy Queening you.
 
  #3  
Old 07-01-15, 09:00 PM
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Thanks, I expected such. It really ticks me off when they treat my wife differently than they do me and this isn't the first time. I'm going to arrange a sit down with someone as close to the owner as I can get and explain the importance of trust and how they are losing it.

Bud
 
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Old 07-02-15, 03:02 AM
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When wifey was planning her return trip from New Mexico, she judiciously took her SUV in for a maintenance check and oil change. Normal stuff. She called and asked if she should have the engine flushed.....at 120k. I told her to hand the phone to the service guy. Whatever you do to this vehicle, she will call me and get approval. So stop with the BS. I think he got the message. You gotta wonder what mind set these guys have. They wouldn't have suggested that to me, so why to my wife. Easy target, I guess.
 
  #5  
Old 07-02-15, 03:54 AM
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Dealers are notorious for this type of BS. I go to a shop who's service manager is a women. She gives straight answers.
 
  #6  
Old 07-02-15, 04:31 AM
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I used to know the two previous service managers and frequently made a point of saying, if you find something else wrong, fix it, I'll pay the bill, and they would. Now, I apparently can't even trust them to do what was arranged and for me it is all complicated by their inability to contact deaf people. No email, no text, just a phone call, so they get my wife's number.

I absolutely do not want to stop using this dealer as it is convenient for the wife, she loves her CRV (and all previous vehicles from that dealer) and even with a few repairs we are spending so much less on maintenance than prior to my little 87 Nissan pu that started it all. I will work hard to correct their approach to service. Hopefully someone near the top will understand my concerns.

And thanks for the replies,
Bud
 
  #7  
Old 07-02-15, 04:56 AM
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I read this thread because I'm experiencing a little brake issue myself this summer.

I've got 258,000 miles on my Volvo S60, and have been changing rotors and pads on the front and rear "when necessary", which is roughly 60,000 to 80,000 miles on the front and 80,000 to 100,000 on the rears. The little shoes used for the parking brake are another story for another day.

I'm still running the original brake calipers (never re-built) but I did replace the master cylinder at about 240,000 miles.

This summer, I began getting a shutter at high speed braking, and it wasn't transmitted to the steering wheel. I thought I might have warped a rotor, but that usually happens here during the winter, or when driving into a puddle after a heated braking.

So, a few weeks ago, I removed each wheel to examine the pads and rotors on each wheel, and look for any obvious irregularity . . . . nothing; but plenty of pad remaining (+/- " remaining on each pad). The left drivers side rear seemed to have a little drag; so I took it to my Mechanic for an examination and he pulled that left rear wheel and took the caliper off to find that the piston had gotten itself crudded up and was getting a little pitted with rust on the exposed area; so it wasn't sliding in and out as freely as when it was new . . . . so he did a good cleaning of the piston and greased it up with a special brake grease. That was a hour of labor . . . . and no part$.

That shuttering sensation is now pretty much gone; but I think I'll have the other rear wheel attended to. Apparently, the rear brakes don't do nearly as much work as the fronts, and these pistons are more likely to get crudded up and require cleaning; but I think it's still a function of road conditions and driving habits that determine the appropriate interval . . . . and my experience is here in Vermont with a few mountains and a lot of snow and ice and MUD,

But that may be the same in Maine ?
 
  #8  
Old 07-02-15, 05:45 PM
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Vermont,

I suspect you're replying to my post about my seized caliper but wrote it in this post instead or not.

(http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pi...e-caliper.html)

Your reply applies to both post I guess.

I doubt most mechanics of dealerships will spend the time to "repair" or rebuild a brake caliper now days. Just replace and get the job done. Dealers have a set cost and time for any car repair and they must adhere to them. If the mechanic can't do it in the allotted time they get reprimanded. An independent might since they are not constrained by the hourly rate of any repair. Besides, when it comes to a brake system I don't think I would want a rebuild. For the time and money involved I'd rather go new.
 
  #9  
Old 07-03-15, 05:07 AM
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No, I hadn't noticed your thread; but they involve different aspects of disc brakes.

I wasn't suggesting that my calipers were rebuilt (or needed to be replaced at all) . . . . only that the caliper guide pins had become crudded up and a little pitted. Removing the guide pins, cleaning them up and burnishing them a little to remove rust, and then applying the appropriate high temperature brake grease allowed the caliper to again "float" the way it did when new.

Of course, buying a new caliper (including new brake guide pins) might result in the same improvement . . . . I just prefer to understand how these units were originally engineered to function, and make sure that they are clean enough to do so.

And the OP might also have a vehicle where the caliper isn't freely floating between brake applications . . . . and an air gun simply may not be enough to free them up. But with a vehicle that new, I doubt that even Maine driving conditions would have already caused the guide pins to become stuck.
 
  #10  
Old 07-03-15, 02:00 PM
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Yes, I agree that cleaning up guide pins is fine and do not always need replacement. On my latest brake job it looked like the guide pins were lubricated with "Never Seize" and not any high temp grease. But I think Never Seize is high temp anyway. I've always used it on my muffler clamps and never had to break a clamp when replacement time came around.
 
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