How Can I Make These Repairs on my Honda Accord?

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  #1  
Old 07-08-16, 08:54 AM
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How Can I Make These Repairs on my Honda Accord?

Hi. I have a 2007 Honda Accord. I have three problems with the exterior. I would like your advice about how to fix these problems. I have also attached pics so you can get a better idea about what the problem is.

1. I have a crack in the exterior side door panel. It looks like a small amount of rust leaks out of this crack and makes the crack look worse. I tried to use touch up paint and I have tried to sand the area, but that just took away any shine from the finish. Can I remove the interior door panel so that i can work on the problem from the other side? What kind of products do you think would help? Are there any instructional videos that would help? I want to minimize the appearance of the damage and prevent the crack from getting worse.

2. The finish on the driver's side exterior panel, above the front tire, has become very dull and matte looking. How do you recommend I get this part of the car to look similar to the rest of the car? What products should I use? Can you point me to any instructional videos that would help.

3. All four of the wheels are pretty badly scratched up. I would like to sand down the scratches, and paint and seal the wheels, to help restore them. Are there certain products you recommend? Can you point me to any instructional videos that may help me.

Thank you.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-08-16, 01:36 PM
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Is the door crack in metal or plastic?

They sell aerosol cans of paint for wheels. Sanding them is fairly straightforward but getting all taped up with the tire still mounted can be challenging.
 
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Old 07-08-16, 01:48 PM
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It looks like it's in metal, right underneath where that door trim piece goes, that protects your door from people flinging their doors open in parking lots. (I'm sure there's a name for the piece it but I'm blanking on it).

My concern is, if it's a true crack, it should probably be properly welded to prevent it from getting worse. Would hate to see tons of effort go into body filler and painting just for the crack to get bigger and the repair fall apart.

As someone who has done home DIY body repair, I can tell you that it may be worth having it professionally evaluated anyway. It's a lot of work, sanding, repairing, prepping, priming, base coat and clear coat, and if done wrong it can look much worse.
 
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Old 07-08-16, 04:22 PM
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Sandblast wheels. You may actually like what they look like after that or paint them. Do NOT sand or grind wheels as you will end up with quite unbalanced wheel.
 
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Old 07-09-16, 04:17 AM
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I agree sandblasting would be ideal but that also means the tire must be unmounted. As long as you are just sanding off the factory coating and not cutting into the aluminum there shouldn't be an issue. While I've only sanded/painted a handful of aluminum rims there never was a balance issue on any of them when I got done.

If you sandblast the wheels and don't paint them they will start looking bad in short order, they need to either have a clear coat sprayed on them or polished.
 
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Old 07-09-16, 05:31 AM
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If you've got the energy to actually do the work you're describing, then I'd recommend that you treat the rusted areas with a rust converter before priming and repainting, or under-coating the steel parts you're working with.

It's important to remember that Iron and Steel DO NOT exist in nature. They're materials that are put together by man. In nature, iron only exists in unison with oxygen, and once smelted by man to create iron or steel, those atoms of iron are continually and actively attempting to re-marry with oxygen to return to their natural state as ferrous oxide. In the end, they will win; but it's our job to delay that reunion as long as possible.

I've been using Rustex (from Supreme Chemicals of Georgia) lately, and just washing rusty surfaces with soap and water and wire-brushing to remove the loose rust first. Rustex chemically converts ferrous oxide to ferrous phosphate . . . . which is inert and becomes your "primer". If you were to remove "all" of the rust, you wouldn't have any loose molecules of ferrous oxide available to create the iron phosphate barrier.

It only works on the exposed surfaces. If the surface gets scratched and exposed to oxygen, the ferrous oxide (rust) will begin to develop again. That might be a safe bet on the inside of your doors, where you're planning to remove the upholstered panels to gain access; but I'd look for sources of moisture in there, or evidence of condensation, and stop that.

Protecting Iron and Steel from rusting is a losing battle; but we only live 27,000 days or thereabouts, so there's a chance we can fend it off for a little while.

That's my 2
 
  #7  
Old 07-09-16, 07:08 AM
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On a 10yr old car I would go with steel wheels and hubcaps.
Scratch up the cap(s) .... then just replace them.
Steel wheels don't leak/seep like old alloys either. much more durable and economical.

Again, on a 10yr old car, I would just oil spray it annually.
It's "expiry date" is too close to be putting big $$s into.

Forget the paint mismatch. Accept it and save your money for a new(er) car down the line.
 
  #8  
Old 07-09-16, 08:19 AM
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I can't speak for the OP's plans with the vehicle, but in my experience, 10 year old Hondas aren't necessarily near their "expiry date." A lot of other cars I might say so, but I've seen Hondas run mechanically fine for a lot longer. I agree the wheels and the faded paint are more cosmetic, but that crack in the door panel could be letting moisture in that will cause bigger issues, like rusting out the door panel or damaging power window components. Hence why I say worry about that crack first and foremost.
 
  #9  
Old 07-09-16, 10:56 AM
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How can the door get a "crack" there ?? Doors just don't "crack" there for nothing.
Is there bondo under it ? Better fix that if there is.

Is the bad paint on the same side as the cracked door? If it is it was likely a bad accident repair.

How many miles on this car? How long have you owned it ?
 
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Old 07-13-16, 11:36 AM
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Hi and thank you for the useful information. Just wanted to follow up t0 answer some questions. now that i think about it, about 8 years ago a neighbor backed into that driver side door. i dont recall the specifics of the damage, but the door was repaired and it looked ok for years. i bought car original in 2007 and it has about 112,000 miles on it. i was hoping to get at least 200,000 miles from it. the bad paint is on the side with the cracked door. i am not sure what "oil spray" it annually means.

how do i go about sandblasting my wheels. i dont have a pressure washer or anything like that.

This is a naive question, but where do i find a set of four undamaged replacement wheels? and if i find them, I can get a garage to put the tires on the wheels?

yes i guess in the least i will need to apply a rust inhibitor to the interior side of the door panel.

auto body work isnt guaranteed forever, right? i remember i was upset about the door being damaged because my car was less than one year old at the time.
 
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Old 07-13-16, 11:53 AM
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When just a portion of a car is repainted - it isn't uncommon for the old/new paint to weather differently. It sounds like the crack might just be a crack in bondo, if so, sanding a groove in the crack and filling with bondo would be the fix.

You need a sandblaster to blast the wheels and the tires would need to be removed first. There are shops that do sandblasting. You could also buy a small portable sandblaster but they need a good sized air compressor to operate. While it's a bit of work, hand sanding can get them decent. Used rims [in varying conditions] can be bought at most junk yards.
 
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