Which floor jack?

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  #1  
Old 08-03-17, 12:43 PM
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Which floor jack?

Hello all,

For DIY projects on car, in my garage at home, I'm looking at these 2 floor jacks; which would you choose?

Arcan HJ3000 $104.98 deliverd from Costco
3.0 Ton Professional Grade Aluminum and Steel service jack
Dual pump pistons for rapid lifting to the load
Dual return springs
Rubber saddle pad protects underside of vehicle
Side handles for easy carrying
Material: Aluminum & Steel
Dimensions: 24" x 11.9" x 6"
Min. Lift Height: 4"
Max. Lift Height: 18.6"
Weight: 58.3 lbs.

OR

Arcan XL35 $109.99 (Was $159.99) delivered from Northern Tool
3 1/2-Ton Low-Profile Professional Service Floor Jack
Dual pump pistons for a quick rise
Bypass and overload valves prevent over extension of hydraulic ram, jack use beyond rated capacity
Thick side plates and reinforced lift arm for added strength, chassis torsion and durability
Material: Steel
Dimensions 28 1/4 x 11 1/4 x 8 1/2
Min. lift height: 3 1/2i"
Max. lift height: 21 3/8"
Weight: 98.8 lbs.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-03-17, 12:58 PM
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What will you be working on? will the 1/2" minimum height difference be an issue? I have a cheap harbor freight jack [3 ton] that works great for everything but my stepson's car which is too low to the ground. Fortunately I have an old 2 ton jack that I can use.

A rubber saddle pad doesn't mean much unless you are working on restored classic/antique cars. Aluminum and it's lighter weight is nice but I rarely pick up my floor jack but just drag it by the handle.
 
  #3  
Old 08-03-17, 03:02 PM
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Thanks!
I don't believe the 1/2" minimum height difference will be an issue because I'm planning to be working mainly on a 96 Honda Civic...But I do like the XL35's more than 2 3/4" additional max height.
FWIW, I like that the HJ3000 is lighter but like you, I'm thinking I'll rarely be picking up the floor jack, off the floor. I do like the rubber saddle pad not so much for avoiding dents, dings & scratches but rather for avoiding potential slippage with metal on metal. I also like Costo's return policy. That said, I'd get the XL35 at over a 30% discount with $50 off $159.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 03:05 PM
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Realistically your not going to be jacking up the whole car or truck at once so you don't need a 3 ton jack for home use. A good 2 ton jack is what you should be looking for. I prefer all steel materials for their strength that aluminum just doesn't offer in certain applications.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 04:11 PM
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A rubber saddle pad doesn't mean much unless you are working on restored classic/antique cars.
I personally have always had a nylon puck in every floor jack I've owned which is only 1. Helps keep from inducing scratches in the frame which helps reduce rust.

I have a 1.5 ton jack and it's served every restoration/repair project I've done for 40 years so a 3 ton is probably over kill.

You lift one corner of a time so not much out there weighing more than 6 tons!
 
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Old 08-03-17, 05:34 PM
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I'm comfortable with 3 ton, because it IS overkill. And because moving forward, I'm considering upgrading to a SUV and/or pickup. My initial thoughts were whether the 100lb weight of the XL35 was worth the extra strength of steel, the additional 2 3/4" max height, as well as giving up Costco's return policy for the 45-day offered by Northern.

Originally Posted by Marq1
... I personally have always had a nylon puck in every floor jack I've owned...
Nylon puck? Interesting...Like a hockey puck??
 
  #7  
Old 08-03-17, 05:58 PM
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It's not a biggie, but I don't think I would want a nylon puck sitting in the jack cup. The cup is designed so the contact surface is "trapped" in the concave jack cup. A nylon puck could slip or slide and cause possible injury. But we all use jack stands before getting under the car anyways. Right?

Just a side note. Never pump up or down a hydraulic jack with your head or body over the handle. Do it at arms length. I almost killed myself with a hydraulic jack that failed. It was Craftsman quality at the time and considered top of the line. I was not under the car. I was in process of lowering the car. The relief valve failed and the full force of the car came down and the handle flew up in a split second and clocked me in the side of the eye socket. I was very lucky that I was not concussioned or blinded, or even killed by the blow. Did not even go to the hospital for possible bone breakage or internal injuries. I was working on my daughter van at the time. She cried thinking it was her fault that I got injured.
 
  #8  
Old 08-05-17, 02:32 PM
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Steel

I do not trust aluminum, steel tends to bend when it fails while aluminium tends to crack more catastrophically. Unless you need the light weight for some reason of portability or convenience, steel is the way to go.

Check the min clearance for your car, some cars with aero type moulding add ons can be lower than the min, even though the jack point itself may not be, but you need to get the jack under there first, so measure the lowest point on the front rear and side of the car before making the choice.
 
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Old 08-05-17, 02:48 PM
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She cried thinking it was her fault that I got injured.
Darn, can't milk a daughter for VIP treatment like you can a wife. "Well, you have your flower box, now can we get my thumb to stop bleeding?!" "Man, moving all your sister's stuff really messed up my back, I can barely get out of my recliner, could you bring me a cold one?".

Ok, seriously, unless you will be picking up the whole front end of monster trucks, 1 1/2 or 2 ton is more than enough. I kinda like the low profile (gator nose) type but they are almost always aluminum and this ain't NASCAR. Speed is not the issue. Safety and reliability are. Any normal jack should be able to get under any normal car.

I got by for 30 yrs with a 1 1/2 ton Craftsman that was abused constantly. I have no doubt that if I really wanted to keep it and rebuilt the pump (seals and fluid) it would last another 30. It's heavy, the handle is a bit short (why I made an extension) and the wheels are too small...but it worked fine.
 
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Old 08-05-17, 05:34 PM
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  #11  
Old 08-06-17, 04:58 AM
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Nylon puck? Interesting...Like a hockey puck??
Nylon, might be rubber, dont recall!

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