Screw extraction, not enough to grip, not enough to dremel, not enough space

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-23-17, 02:38 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 799
Screw extraction, not enough to grip, not enough to dremel, not enough space

What should have been a simple license bulb replacement has turned into a botched attempt at extracting a philips head screw.

The remaining nub of the screw itself it's circled. I'm unable to secure even my smallest vice on it.
It's too small to dremel a groove for a flathead.
I thought about removing the fixture but it's one entire fixture (red rectangle) which would involve removing the handle opener, the key assembly, etc and from previous experience, trunk components are real finicky and after having owned a non-opening trunk for years on another car, I wouldn't repeat.

Any other options to extract the screw (other than a screw extractor which is what got me here in the first place)?
Bear in mind there's minimal room to work with.

On a side note I've always been curious as to why every other format (torx, hex, etc) goes in flush into the screw and these problems don't occur and yet the tapered philips, almost specifically designed to strip, is the most popular head of choice.

Thanks
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-23-17, 03:09 PM
Bob14525's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 1,302
I don't know if you have room for this but I've had luck using a hack saw blade to cut a slot in the screw head. If you have limited space, you can break the hack saw blade into a short piece. You can clamp a pair of vice grips onto the piece of hack saw blade to act as a handle.
 
  #3  
Old 10-23-17, 08:22 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: NJ - USA
Posts: 43,508
It looks like the plastic plate or fixture has depth. A screw extractor won't work there. You could try drilling the head of the screw to get it thin enough where you pried on the fixture the remaining part of the screw head would snap off. You need to drill carefully as too much heat will melt the fixture.

Use like a 3/16"-1/4" bit.
 
  #4  
Old 10-23-17, 10:04 PM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 7,684
Here ar some extractors from Lowes bt usually ant hardware store will have them, The second one should work.
https://www.lowes.com/search?searchT...rew+extraction
 
  #5  
Old 10-23-17, 10:13 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: NJ - USA
Posts: 43,508
The biggest problem is that it's a #6 or #8 screw at the most.
 
  #6  
Old 10-24-17, 06:40 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MI
Posts: 2,465
I think I would still use a Dremel 1" abrasive disk wheel to cut a slot. The slot might extend a little onto the plastic but that shouldn't cause any harm to its function or seal.

There are diamond grit thin metal disks also available as a replacement for the fragile abrasive ones. I have some but haven't tried yet. Probably got them at Harbor Freight.
 
  #7  
Old 10-24-17, 07:28 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,834
How you doing Michael?
Let us know if you have solved the problem or want more suggestions.
You asked why phillip screws seem to strip more often. There are different types of phillips and when you use the wrong screwdriver they don't do well. I can't explain but saw a lot of hits on a search.
A left hand drill bit would either drill out the head or catch and remove the screw like an extractor.

Wish you luck
Bud
 
  #8  
Old 10-24-17, 07:30 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 799
It's an M3 sized screw so even with a thin disk (doubt I could fit one in there anyway) it's not feasible to grind a slot.
If a slot could be ground out, that assumes there's enough on the outsides not to snap off when twisting. It also assumes the screw's not seized to the point that I could even remove it with a flathead.
Remember the way this whole thing started is it was too seized to turn loose and eventually stripped etc
 
  #9  
Old 10-24-17, 10:27 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: NJ - USA
Posts: 43,508
Your only choice is to drill the head.
 
  #10  
Old 10-24-17, 01:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 799
The head has been drilled off, I need to get the stem out from within the threaded hole
 
  #11  
Old 10-24-17, 01:50 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: NJ - USA
Posts: 43,508
Is there anything left to grab ?
If not you'll have to push it out with a punch or drill it out. Drilling it out may require a slightly larger screw for reassembly.
 
  #12  
Old 10-25-17, 05:28 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 484
Removing the threaded portion of the screw is doable. Unless you have many tools, reversible drill, number drill bits (right and left hand), center drills, precision measuring devices like micrometers or calipers, fluted screw extractors, grinding wheel, etc., this is not a DIY project because of the cost of buying the tools and precision required as to not damage the existing threads. I would go to someone with a MIG welder and have a nut welded to the stuck screw. Removal is simply turning the nut. If you have all these tools or wish to purchase them, respond and I will give further advice.
 
  #13  
Old 10-30-17, 04:40 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 31
I know you said "I wouldn't", but finding factory service literature may be helpful in replacing that part instead of trying to go through what you are trying to do. Trunk lids are nice in that you can somewhat easily access the insides. Year make and model would help?
 
  #14  
Old 10-30-17, 06:35 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MI
Posts: 2,465
As I was reading the previous response I was thinking "the service manual isn't going to have any answers for a broken screw"...but then realized it may be some help. @OP: Do you know what the broken screw threads into? It's pretty common for a plastic housing like that to be mounted in a cutout in the sheetmetal with a screw & panel nut. Those thin clips do rust easily. If that's what's behind the housing you might consider just pushing the screw through with a punch. It will destroy the panel nut but won't hurt the housing or the trunk lid. Replace the nut with a new one & matching screw.

The parts counter guy at your local dealer should be able to look up the exploded parts diagram & show you what type of screw & nut are used.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'