Short commute leads to bad exhaust

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  #1  
Old 11-01-17, 06:02 PM
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Short commute leads to bad exhaust

Hi everyone, was curious if you had any ideas for this? I have a 1997 Honda Civic with about 160,000 miles on it. I basically use it for commuting to work, which is only about 3 1/2 miles each way. I donít drive it any long distances either. The problem is my exhaust pipes and my muffler donít seem to last much longer than a year. Last year I replaced the muffler and around 10 months later the new muffler was already making bad sounds. I just replaced it again a few days ago, but my exhaust was still allowed. I double checked underneath and my exhaust pipe before the muffler already has two holes forming in the 90į bend. I only replaced that less than a year ago too.

Granted, the pipes that Iím buying are just from advanced auto parts and they are about $100 each. I donít buy the top of the line because the car is old. But then again, I donít know if more expensive pipes would last any longer due to my commute. Iím told the short commute is not allowing the water inside the exhaust to burn off and is causing the holes.

Anybody have any thoughts?
 
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Old 11-01-17, 08:09 PM
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a location would help to answer you. but yes buying cheep metal and not getting it hot to remove condensation will do the trick.
 
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Old 11-01-17, 08:28 PM
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Next time you replace it, get stainless steel. Many places will guarantee them as long as you own your car.
 
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Old 11-02-17, 07:44 AM
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I've had to replace the A-pipe, the B pipe (at the 90-degree bend), and the muffler several times. See attached image.

Do you have any recommendations of online places that have that guarantee for stainless steel pipes?
 
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Old 11-02-17, 08:50 AM
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Think back to the 60's and 70's when it was very common to replace exhaust systems several times in the life of a car.

Today, I haven't change an exhaust component in 40+ year.

Why, because OEM's now use Stainless Steel components.

If you are buying cheap, even at $100, low quality non Stainless pipes you will replace frequently!

My favorite saying, Sometime cheap is expensive!
 
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Old 11-02-17, 10:42 AM
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Model?

Is the sub model ex, dx or lx?

You might consider splicing in a stainless elbow with clamps in the area rotting in the rear pipe, it must be a low point and collects the moisture. The front pipe would get hot quickly so I am surprised yours is rotting out frequently. I would get an OEM pipe for this.

The stainless systems are usually "cat back" which would not solve for your entire system. Walker makes a stainless muffler with OEM sound character.
 
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Old 11-02-17, 01:36 PM
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The model is an EX.

I've definitely had to replace the A-pipe and the flex pipe a few times, but not nearly as fast as the B-pipe and the muffler.

The muffler that I just put on claims to be "stainless", but there are some folks that reviewed it saying it's only partly stainless. I have no idea how you would even know that. It's the Walker one that you referenced below, and I got it from Advanced Auto. This is the link:
https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/...042/18291044-P

The 90-degree elbow is a good idea. Would that have to be welded on?
 
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Old 11-03-17, 07:43 AM
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Stent

I think any good muffler shop would be able to weld stainless to mild steel, but I would just get the u bend, have a muffler shop expand the ends to slip fit over the existing pipe after you cut of the bend section, and use muffler clamps to join the items. Maybe a bit of muffler cement to make sure you have a good seal.

The walker muffler is stainless, the pipes in and out may not be. Stainless is a bit more brittle than mild steel, so would not necessarily be the ideal material for eg. the flanges where you want strength, and the flange is thick enough that it would withstand typical corrosion.

Not sure what the pipe diameter is that you would have to splice. Here is a link to some stainless U bends, my guess is you would need the 1.75" one, and then have the ends expanded to slip fit over what is probably a 1.75" outside diameter pipe.

Mandrel bends-Stainless

You want the expanded ends to looks like on the left side of this http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Jetex-Mand...-/371102671320
 
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Old 11-10-17, 08:06 PM
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Have you tried high heat paint ceramic paint?
 
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Old 11-10-17, 08:17 PM
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You know, to stop corrosion.
 
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Old 11-10-17, 08:43 PM
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Nope never gave that a shot. Where do you even get such a thing?
 
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Old 11-11-17, 04:57 AM
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Have you tried high heat paint ceramic paint?
.
How would you paint the inside of the pipe? That is where the corrosion is happening.
 
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Old 11-11-17, 06:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand
". . . How would you paint the inside of the pipe? . . ."
Someone who's really handy could lift the rear end of the vehicle vertically and pour paint down the tailpipe to coat the inside.
 
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Old 11-11-17, 08:31 AM
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Someone who's really handy could lift the rear end of the vehicle vertically and pour paint down the tailpipe to coat the inside.
Yeah, just stand out of the way when the car is started. LOL
 
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Old 11-12-17, 11:03 AM
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Talking

Someone who's really handy could lift the rear end of the vehicle vertically and pour paint down the tailpipe to coat the inside.

Yeah, just stand out of the way when the car is started. LOL

And stand way back when the car is rotated to coat the entire inside of the muffler!
 
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