Trying to find out what wheel lock pattern this is?

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  #1  
Old 12-14-17, 11:53 PM
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Trying to find out what wheel lock pattern this is?

My wheels: ATS Racelight 19 inch

Can anyone help me identify what wheel lock key/pattern this is?
I think I'll need to find one on the internet and buy it. I'm not sure if most tire
service centers would be able to unlock that wheel lock.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-15-17, 12:40 AM
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As far as I know there are many different combinations of lug locks. You were supposed to get that key when you bought the car. If you bought the car used or lost the key you may need to go to the dealer and order one. It will be VIN dependent if it's an OEM lug.

There are companies like McGard that make a similar locking nut.
Those may be made by them.
 
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Old 12-15-17, 12:43 AM
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I'm sure tire shops have one tool or another that will lock on, twist off, pull out, or grind away the lock somehow. They probably deal with this all the time.
 
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Old 12-15-17, 03:52 AM
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Hope you can find a key. I ave taken many locks off without a key. Some times a wheel lock remover will work. Sometimes you have to drill them out. Can get very expensive if they have to go that route. I would not warranty wheel from damage if I had to drill or some how cut them off. Most locks are a hardened steel. Been many years since I did this they might have better tools now for this.
 
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Old 12-15-17, 05:53 AM
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They're all different. The "key" should have been in the Glove Compartment; but that's too convenient for car thieves so people hide them in some secret easily forgotten place. I kept mine in the trunk with the Lug Wrench; but that didn't prevent it from being lost.

McGard doesn't make it very easy to get replacement "keys".

I had the "key" for such a set lost 20 years ago when someone had a flat and dropped the "key" alongside the road.

I had to pay to have the vehicle towed and pay to have all of the other Lock ground down o fit a smaller hexagonal socket.

Maybe someone can position an Easy Out in that hardened steel ?

I don't envy you.
 
  #6  
Old 12-15-17, 08:13 AM
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thanks for the replies. I will keep asking around and see if I can find it!
 
  #7  
Old 12-15-17, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by guy293482
"thanks for the replies. I will keep asking around and see if I can find it!"
I suppose you've already contacted the prior Owner; s/he's the only one who would have ever had the enciphered code for the "key" in order to buy a replacement from McGard (IF that was the manufacturer).

No one is going to be able to match up the lock pattern by LOOKING at the Lock Nut !

They're all different . . . . and they're all different intentionally.

Meanwhile . . . . don't get a flat !

PS: If I recall correctly, I had to register the Lock Set with McGard so that I could call their 800 # at anytime in the future and obtain a new "Key" provided I could prove I was the rightful Owner . . . . I wonder if that procedure is still available ?
 

Last edited by Vermont; 12-15-17 at 09:56 AM. Reason: Added PostScript
  #8  
Old 12-16-17, 06:05 AM
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Ah, I never knew that one can't tell just by looking at the lock. I thought the shape or pattern of the grooves would indicate what kind of lock I would need. No reply from previous owner yet, still waiting. Is there any visible way to tell if this is a McGard brand or not? Would contacting ATS be fruitful? I'm guessing the previous owner got this lock key with the ATS Racelight wheels when he bought them. Or is common for people to just buy expensive wheels and then buy a lock key separately from another source?
 
  #9  
Old 12-16-17, 06:28 AM
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Was just checking out a bunch of videos on how to remove wheel locks without a key. It looks like it shouldn't be that hard? They use a deep well socket with as many teeth in it as possible, then hammer it on and remove it with the breaker bar.

Mine looks like there isn't a lot of space between the wheel lock and the wheel so I will need a really thin wall socket I guess.
 
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Old 12-16-17, 06:36 AM
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Originally Posted by guy293482
". . . is common for people to just buy expensive wheels and then buy a lock key separately from another source? . . ."
No, the previous Owner got the Key when s/he bought the Lock Set, . . . . you buy a Lock Set as a package so that the "Key" matches the 4 Special Locking Lug Nuts or Locking Lug Bolts.

The "Key" is unique to that Lock Set, or possibly another that was sold far enough away to be statistically impossible to accidentally match, if someone tried to randomly match up a "key" that they may have found (or stolen) with all parked cars in, say for instance, all of the cars parked in a Mall's Parking Lot . . . . it would be a waste of time.

If it were easy to match up by eyeball, that would defeat the whole purpose.

PS: If you call McGard, you'll probably need to have the VIN handy.
 

Last edited by Vermont; 12-16-17 at 07:18 AM. Reason: Added PostScript
  #11  
Old 12-16-17, 10:54 AM
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I had a set of different sockets for locks. Sometimes they worked but when they don't be prepared for some cost.. As I said before it could get expensive. I have spent many hours getting them off.
Yours with the thin clearance will be harder.
 
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Old 12-16-17, 05:37 PM
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1. Weld something onto it.
2. Get GripTite socket set. They may lock on the lock
3. Quality 12 point socket may be hammered on, like you found.
4. Look where jack is stowed in the car. I keep wife's lock key under jack in her car. Logically.

Good part about those locks is that they are only supposed to be hand torqued, or they fall apart. So it should be easier to remove than other nuts. Bad part is - it appears to be really recessed into the wheel. I had some locks removed that were protruding from the wheel, so good vise grip locked on did the job.
 
  #13  
Old 12-17-17, 05:12 AM
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all good advice, thanks.
I'll keep you guys posted on this at a later time when I eventually get them off. I won't be removing them this winter, but I'll definitely look into changing my tires next spring/summer.

The more I keep researching, the more I'm finding how pointless wheel locks are it seems, as there are many ways to remove it without a wheel lock key. I hope mine won't be hard. The good thing is there's only 1 wheel lock per wheel. The other ones are just regular.
 
  #14  
Old 12-17-17, 06:17 AM
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I would recommend you getting them off as soon as possible. A flat tire would be more than a inconvenience, it could be a all day job. The good side most locks will come off with the tools. Get them off and replace with one with key or regular lug nut.
 
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Old 12-17-17, 07:29 AM
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I second that. I cringe every time I roll on a flat tire call and spot a wheel lock when i get there, praying the owner has the adapter. Can't count the number of times I had to tow to a tire shop vice the simple tire change.

As mentioned, one of the preferred methods for removal is pounding an undersized socket on and then gunning it off. There are also specialized external ez-outs for the job like these:

https://www.awdirect.com/deluxe%2Dhu...rvice%2Dtools/

https://www.awdirect.com/easy-off-me...service-tools/

As also noted, though, the clearance could be an issue.
 
  #16  
Old 12-18-17, 03:28 AM
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I agree it looks closest to a McGard pattern. There are stickers in the packages that one is instructed to place. One on the registration card, one on the packaging itself, and one somewhere in the glove box. If it is a McGard set, I hope that the previous owner followed the instructions and you can find the sticker with "serial number" in the glove box somewhere.
 
  #17  
Old 12-18-17, 06:37 AM
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Have a weld shop mig/tig weld a nut (internal thread portion) to the anti-theft lug. Nut should not be larger than lug diameter at the keying. Use a socket on the nut to remove lug. Hope this helps.
 
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