Replacing O2 Sensor on 2004 Suzuki Forenza

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  #1  
Old 12-19-17, 07:01 AM
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Replacing O2 Sensor on 2004 Suzuki Forenza

Good Morning!

2004 Suzuki Forenza
Error Code: P0134

My check engine light is on with this code which is for the upstream O2 sensor. I am not a mechanic by any means, but would like to replace this part myself if possible. As far as the correct parts for my car - can I buy a cheaper universal part? I have found O2 sensors ranging from $20 all the way to $200+ so I'm not sure if there's a major difference or if I can just purchase a cheaper one.

I was looking at this part to purchase: https://www.autozone.com/emission-co...828034_0_97999 I only want to replace the part without having to do any wiring so this part does not require any of that. I also found this one, but seems odd that it is so cheap: https://www.am-autoparts.com/2004/Su...RoCbAEQAvD_BwE

Can anyone confirm that I am indeed looking at the correct O2 sensor to replace and the correct part to use? Any suggestions would be appreciated. Please let me know if you think I would be better off going to a mechanic as well - I am on a budget, but I'm due for inspection here by 12/31.

Thanks in advance for any help!
 
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  #2  
Old 12-19-17, 08:03 AM
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Autozone is nuts, the other place is about right on the price. You could always try looking on Amazon or a local autoparts store . You may also need a oxygen sensor wrench, most are difficult to remove without one.
 
  #3  
Old 12-26-17, 12:06 PM
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I found and ordered the part for about $30. However, I have new codes coming up on my check engine light.

Now, the original O2 sensor code P0134 is not even coming up - all I did was remove it and clean it off a bit then reattach.

New codes I'm getting relate to the camshaft position sensor: P0342 and P0341

P0342 is popping up twice, but one of them says Pending. I think this code is related to P0341, but correct me if I'm wrong. Now, should I just go ahead and replace the camshaft position sensor or do you think my code reader is faulty? It seems odd that I have different codes popping up without even driving the car this week. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 
  #4  
Old 12-26-17, 07:29 PM
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How did you clean the current possibly bad O2 sensor? Although, that also has nothing to do with the Cam position sensor...
 
  #5  
Old 12-27-17, 07:06 AM
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I used carb cleaner (safe for O2 sensors). I know it isn't usually recommended to do that, but I ordered a new one already so it was worth a shot and it seemingly worked for now at least.
 
  #6  
Old 12-27-17, 08:09 AM
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I think most of those O2 Sensors are sealed and have a carefully calibrated spring inside which, unfortunately, will ultimately fatigue and break after 150,000 or 200,000 miles.

Here's hoping that your replacement Sensor puts out a signal that matches the expectations of the car's ECM and will calculate an acceptable result.
 
  #7  
Old 12-27-17, 11:04 AM
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Miles on the car? The cam position sensors do fail, the sensors are general motors parts who must have had a deal with Suzuki for this model. Probably a coincidence with the O2 sensor, but might want to disconnect the battery for a while, let the computer reset and see if the codes still come up.
 
  #8  
Old 12-27-17, 12:18 PM
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There's almost 150,000 miles on the car so it's definitely possible some of the parts have reached their limit. I've got the new O2 sensor ordered and will install if necessary. I'll try disconnecting the battery and see what codes I get after - how long would I need to leave the battery disconnected?
 
  #9  
Old 12-28-17, 05:57 PM
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Disconnect the negative battery terminal, and let the car sit for at least 15 minutes. I would actually let it sit for an hour or so, you want any residual capacitor charges in the electrical system to completely bleed off.

Then start up and drive the car normally for 30 minutes or more. The ecu will relearn, and any new codes that show up and self resolve will clear in about 30 minutes. After that, any codes still showing will be diagnostic for an unresolved matter.

You could probably disconnect for 10 seconds and start up and drive around the block, but I prefer to drag out the procedure as noted and maximize the odds of getting a reliable code reading.

Also note that sometimes codes are thrown but the car runs fine. This is often the case for things that might impact emissions, which the O2 sensor and crank sensors certainly can affect. But its not a big deal, the car will not be harmed by these things, but of course the sensors are probably nearing their useful lifespan. Doing an O2 sensor and crank sensor on a car this age would be reasonable.

But if you are on a budget as you note, and can handle a light being on, you could no doubt drive for some time until the car actually feels like it is not running as smoothly as it should. Lots of old cars have a piece of electrical tape over the check engine light! I like to be preventative with my cars, but at 14 years old/150,000 miles, it does make sense to focus funds on items of safety like brakes, tires and perhaps some fuel/coolant hoses as priorities.
 
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