deciphering battery date

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Old 02-11-18, 02:52 PM
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deciphering battery date

I'm unclear how to determine the age of the car battery by looking at the punched-out dates/codes on the battery sticker that the auto parts store punched out when it was purchased. The particular one shown below apparently had the January punched out in the top row, and the row below apparently has the 3 punched out. My guess would be that could mean it was purchased in January of 2003 but to me that seems an awful long time ago and I'm pretty sure I bought this battery more currently than that. There's no Car Quest store here in my community anymore so I can't simply take it there and ask them. Any help appreciated, thanks.

 
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Old 02-11-18, 04:09 PM
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2013...not 2003. That would be about right for replacement at 5 yrs.
 
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Old 02-11-18, 04:14 PM
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If it were mine, I would assume January 2013.
 
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Old 02-11-18, 04:58 PM
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Thanks, yeah 2013 then, okay. Thanks.

So also a followup qyestion to the idea of replacing and older battery that is coming (or past due) to its recommended time of replacement with a new one:

I've heard there are "memory saver" devices that can be plugged in somewhere in the car (cigarette lighter socket etc) so that when the old battery is disconnected for removal the radio/stereo settings and onboard computer and such don't lose their memory and have to be re-programmed or reset? I have a 1998 Ranger and a 2005 Kia, anybody know whether one of these memory saver devices could/should work for these vehicles?
 
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Old 02-11-18, 05:05 PM
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It has to go in the cig lighter or another connection that is always hot with the key off. Heck, with a 9 volt battery, some wire, and some alligator clips, you can make your own. Just connect hot to hot and negative to negative, pull the cables off, put the new battery in and disconnect the 9 volt. It's enough to keep the memory on everything, but not power any dome lights or anything so make sure the doors are closed and the key is off.. Can't leave it connected the 12V source for too long, but a few minutes is no big deal.

Unless having the battery die would be life threatening or very very inconvenient, why not just have it tested before replacement? I just replaced one in my 2004 Suzuki that gave plenty of warning of it's impending failure and it was a 7 yrs old cheapy from Walmart.
 
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Old 02-11-18, 06:59 PM
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The removable stickers depict the sold date.
There is also a manufacturing date hot stamped into the battery.
 
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Old 02-11-18, 07:08 PM
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with a 9 volt battery, some wire, and some alligator clips, you can make your own. Just connect hot to hot and negative to negative, pull the cables off, put the new battery in and disconnect the 9 volt.
Sounds good.
1. How do I connect the wire(s) to the 9 volt battery? Alligator clips on that end of the wires to connect to the 9 volt battery terminals?
2. Probably use somewhat larger size clips for the wire ends clipped to the battery cable ends? Niot sure if regular size alligator clips would be big enough to clip onto the battery cable ends, would they?
3. About what gauge of wire would be appropriate?

Can't leave it connected the 12V source for too long, but a few minutes is no big deal.
By "it" do you mean the 9 volt battery? Because if left connected to the 12V source longer than more than a few minutes it might be harmful?
 

Last edited by sgull; 02-11-18 at 08:05 PM.
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Old 02-11-18, 07:13 PM
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The removable stickers depict the sold date. There is also a manufacturing date hot stamped into the battery.
So for example if what they're calling it is a "60 month" battery, does that usually refer to 60 months past the date of sale, or past the date of manufacturing?
 
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Old 02-11-18, 07:25 PM
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Your warranty on that battery is based on the bill of sale or the stamped battery date if you don't have the bill of sale.
 
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Old 02-11-18, 07:43 PM
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Yep, just some clips on both ends sized to what you'll be connecting them to. Make sure you don't let them touch. Normally just clipping them from opposite sides of the 9 volt will be enough. After you're done, just stash the wires in your tool box for future use. They can be used for testing bulbs, temporary troubleshooting connections, all sorts of things.

You don't need anything thick at all for wire... the load from the ECM and radio is miniscule. 14-16 ga would be plenty and easier to work with than real thin or thick stuff.

And yeah, you don't want it connected to the 12V batteries for too long since it will basically try to charge the 9V. Since it will probably be an alkaline (Eveready, Duracell, etc) which shouldn't be charged, it can get hot and swell or leak. I think it's a pretty small chance of that happening, but theoretically it's possible.
 
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Old 02-11-18, 08:18 PM
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you don't want it connected to the 12V batteries for too long since it will basically try to charge the 9V. Since it will probably be an alkaline (Eveready, Duracell, etc) which shouldn't be charged, it can get hot and swell or leak. I think it's a pretty small chance of that happening, but theoretically it's possible.
I'd plan on not having it connected any longer than to do the battery replacement, a few minutes at most I suppose. And if the worst that could theoretically possibly happen is that the 9V might get hot and swell or leak, that couldn't be so bad except that the 9V would be ruined. Obviously would not want to take a chance on it exploding in my face or something, but doesn't sound like that is a risk, otherwise you'd have cautioned/advised accordingly I'm sure.
 
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Old 02-12-18, 02:38 AM
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I've never done anything but replace a battery [no memory saver] and never had any issues. Some cars would loose their radio presets but others wouldn't [don't know why] Never had it cause any issues with the computer.
 
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Old 02-13-18, 05:40 AM
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What make/year/model vehicle are you talking about?
 
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Old 03-19-18, 11:12 AM
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There is also a manufacturing date hot stamped into the battery.
Or a sticker the size of a quarter with a single letter and a single number.
A to L for January to December. A = January, B = February.
The number indicates the last digit of the year.

B7 = February 2017

When I do buy a battery which is rare, I make sure I get the freshest one and bring a DMM along to measure its voltage.
 
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