Jeep Wrangler Front Wheel Locking Up

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Old 09-23-18, 05:46 PM
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Jeep Wrangler Front Wheel Locking Up

My right front wheel on my 2012 Jeep Wrangler has not been turning freely. I replaced the caliper and pads today. When I went for a test drive, the wheel was turning freely. However, the left front brake was grabbing a little more than the right. I figured perhaps a little air got in the line when I removed the old caliper, so I bled the right front line. I took it for another test drive after bleeding. For about a minute or so, everything felt okay. Braking felt even. Then, I felt the Jeep lagging or struggling to go forward. When I got back home, the right front wheel was smoking it was so hot. What else could cause my right front brake to lock down like this? Also, have I now ruined my new caliper and pads? I didn't go very far, just around my block. I had a similar problem with the left rear wheel previously. When I replaced that caliper and pad, I also replaced the rotor. Can a rotor get so hot it gets warped? Wouldn't I feel the warp (assuming the front right is warped) when I apply the brakes?
 
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Old 09-23-18, 07:57 PM
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often a brake hose would cause a caliper not to release.
 
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Old 09-23-18, 08:19 PM
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Not sure, but could the anti-lock system cause such an issue? If the hose is ok, thats what I'd be looking at next. Testing could be as simple as removing a fuse.
 
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Old 09-23-18, 08:25 PM
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Thanks for the responses. I'll take a look at the hose and pull the fuse on the anti-lock brakes too.
 
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Old 09-23-18, 08:54 PM
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the hose may appear to be ok but its swelling on the inside of the hose that you cant see, often there is no good way to diagnose them as being bad, sometimes compressing the caliper would be much easier with the bleeder screw loose witch usually tells you something is wrong with the hose but the caliper may compress ok so it doesn't always help. would probably recheck the brakes over and replace the front hoses if you dont see anything wrong.
 
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Old 09-24-18, 01:54 AM
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Easy way to check hose is to jack up wheel. Crack bleeder.and than see if the wheel turns free. tighten bleed screw and pump up brakes. if wheel is stuck or turns hard crack bleed screw again . If now wheel turns free the caliper is working and the hose is bad.
 
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Old 09-24-18, 03:26 AM
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I have 2010 wrangler and had to replace 3 of the calipers this year for the same reason. If the hose checks out good I'd suspect a bad replacement caliper. If you've only drove a few miles the pads should be ok.
 
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Old 09-25-18, 10:30 AM
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Did you verify caliper mounting bolt bushings slide freely in their bore when you had the caliper off? Frozen bushings will prevent caliper moving away from disc when brake pedal released,
 
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Old 09-25-18, 10:50 AM
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I don't know about every supplier but my new calipers came with a new mounting bracket, bolts and bushings.
 
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Old 09-27-18, 08:00 AM
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Caliper

The caliper can bind if the hose has perished internally. Definitely happens, but the age of the car being only 8 years old, that would be an important component failure before it would be expected. And it sounds like the problem was happening before you replaced the caliper, but worse after? That would suggest the caliper was not the problem, so a brake line sounds like a culprit.

You can't tell if a hose has internally failed by inspection. But a hose can be pinched where there is corrision at a hose bracket, or someone clamped the hose to avoid a full brake bleed on replacement of a caliper. Might see some evidence on the outside of these things.


To rule other things out:

The caliper moves along slider pins. They need to be unpitted and greased with brake grease. If they are dry or gucked up/corroded, they can bind. Sounds like yoursare new, might still check there is grease in there. Easy to undo one caliper slider bolt and check.

The caliper bolts themselves are often way overtightened, they need to be torqued correctly , prehaps with a bit of loctite blue for greater certianty such that they hold without excessive torque being required. If too tight, the castings might be misalligned. Probably not the issue, but worth checking everything related to the installation.

The pads and brakets themselves often have metal to metal contact points. Most brake installers use a bit of anitseize compound on these points to lubricated and prevent corrosion. If dry, the caliper movement can bind, twist and stick. This would be my bet on the problem. I think the trade would call this "rust jacking".

Probably all your calipers need this. Many owners manuals tell you to disassemble and lube calipers as part of a scheduled maintence service that many people don't do, especially relevent if you life in snow and salt climates.

The piston inside the caliper can bind. If the caliper is a rebuild, which is usually the case, the bore might have been pitted and the rebuilder just put in new pistons, or maybe just new seals. Not all rebuilds are done to a high standard. So it may be a defective "new" caliper.

Hard to see anitlock system being a problem, affecting only one wheel circuit.

The overheating for the short distance you note would not hurt the pad or disc, they can take quite a bit of abuse, racers get them very hot. If the caliper seal was damaged by the heat, it will weep or leak, so that might just be worth a bit more inspections from time to time to ensure its ok. Consider your brake pads bedded in, the way old school racers used to bed new pads to discs!
 
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