Wheel stud extension

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Old 11-09-18, 08:40 PM
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Wheel stud extension

so I just bought some new rims and found out that they don't fit with the current wheel studs that I have went to AutoZone and found out that I need and a wheel stud and extension all around but ran into the problem that I do not know that I need the right size wellstead try to research but I keep coming I keep running into walls and I don't want to just get the wrong stud. And find out that I took apart my car just to find out that it's the wrong one. so I'm here asking if anyone can help me out with the right stud size for a 2006 Toyota Camry LE.
 
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Old 11-09-18, 09:48 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

I have seen some nasty problems with stud extenders breaking or loosening up. I'd consider getting new studs for the rotors if you are completely set on using those rims. I'm not certain on your vehicle but most rotors use press in studs. You'd need a shop to press them for you. Maybe be best to consult your tire guy as you would need to ID the thread size you have and how much longer you'd need.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 01:11 AM
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Thanks, pjmax

Yeah I was advised I should do that but wanted to check out the forums first on account that I wanted to learn how to do these things and I like working with my hands
 
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Old 11-10-18, 02:32 AM
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Were the new rims actually "new" with the correct "offset" for your 2006 Toyota Camry ?

In other words, were they bought from a reputable concern who should have known exactly what you'd need to have them fit properly, and for the car still be aligned and have the same handling characteristics on the road . . . . and with no rubbing inside the wheel well.

Did the Seller of these wheels forewarn you about the Stud Length ? I hope this one problem doesn't foretell many others yet to come.

Will the wheels still be well seated on the Rotor/Hub with the longer studs, or will there be a gap ?
 
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Old 11-10-18, 03:42 AM
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I'm not certain on your vehicle but most rotors use press in studs. You'd need a shop to press them for you
I've always used a punch and a hammer to knock out the old stud and then grease up and hammer the new one in. It might take a little extra from driving the nut up with an impact to fully seat the new stud. I've never used a press to install them ..... not that I've done a lot of stud replacement.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 04:19 AM
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This is relatively new car and the studs would be part of the wheel bearing.

You will not just tap these out of the bearings and even if they were replaced you would probably screw up the concentricity so much the vehicle would vibrate.

Never even heard of stud extenders and looked them up, dont go that route!

You need the correct wheels for you vehicle!
 
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Old 11-10-18, 04:21 AM
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It's great that you want to do more of these things for yourself. And I seriously mean that. It's very commendable, and can be very rewarding. But there are times when we laymen still need to rely on expert advice, and this is one of those times. As Vermont mentioned, there's more to it than finding a way to hold the wheels on the vehicle. Simply extending the studs is going to change the forces on the studs and other components dramatically. That's where the offsets that he mentioned come into play. Swapping stock tires and wheels for custom ones is very common, and I have to admit that I do find some such modifications appealing. But to do it right there are a lot of factors to consider. At a minimum I would start by visiting a local quality tire store, tell them what you have, and see what they might suggest.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 05:33 AM
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"You need the correct wheels for you vehicle! "

^^^^ THIS ^^^^
 
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Old 11-10-18, 05:56 AM
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I dont think I had ever heard of stud extenders before now. So, I did a little research.

Stud extenders are for wheel simulators.... not for holding the wheel on your vehicle. This is just one site that explains the use of stud extenders:
"Phoenix offers all of the replacement parts that you need for your wheel simulators. These stud extenders are made from quality materials and extend the length of the studs to properly install your wheel simulators. Order the model used in your particular simulator kit."
https://www.summitracing.com/search/...stud-extenders

Every site I looked at for stud extenders, stated basically the same thing. DO NOT use stud extenders to hold your wheels on your car.

Wheel simulators: https://www.summitracing.com/parts/c...waAhxyEALw_wcB
 
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Old 11-10-18, 06:20 AM
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Folks,

This is relatively new car and the studs would be part of the wheel bearing.

They can't be punched out because they are pressed into the hub and backed by hub structure. To replace front studs you have to replace entire hub assembly. Plenty of new vehicles FWD are exactly same way - broken stud=new hub.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 06:43 AM
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To replace front studs you have to replace entire hub assembly
You can get them out but agree the amount of work to replace a stud vs replacing the bearing is borderline!
 
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Old 11-10-18, 08:14 PM
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Studs

You can get longer length studs made by ARP, which are better made then OEM. https://arp-bolts.com/kits/product.php?PL=55

You can usually press out in car using a tie rod removal tool. Takes time but works and you definitely do not hammer them out, you will damage the bearing. Of course in an emergency a few good blows with a hammer and a punch will get most studs out, but this is not a good way to deal with an important bearing. Removing the bearing hub and using a press is indeed the preferred way of redoing the studs.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/autom...stud/view-all/

Longer studs are often used for racers and those who use spacers on their wheels. Extended length studs will be safe. But stud extenders are not. Nor are longer length lug nuts, Gorilla makes these but seems risky to me, may be ok if you need a very small extra length.

In any event, the offset of the wheels on front wheel drive cars can be very important. You can check your wheel offsets using the following guide.

https://www.moderntiredealer.com/art...offset-matters

You need to have the offset the same as the OEM wheels for safe handling/braking. Its all about the "scrub radius". Your front wheel drive car most likely has positive offset wheels, so you can safely use wheels with too much positive offset but you use spacers to move the scrub radius back to the correct location. This of course may require even longer studs than the extended length ARP's, if so you are out of luck.

So what you have in mind might be possible to do safely. But you need to check what you have, and make sure the wheel can be in fact with suitable modifications meet the required technical specs before diving into the project.

This is definitely an area where a well researched DIY can succeed, but there is real expertise in this area of wheel fitment, and getting it wrong is not without consequence. I would suggest you get someone experienced to do all this, but use the opportunity to understand what is being done. Or at least have the front ones done by the shop and do the rears if you want to keep the costs down or just enjoy this type of project.
 
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Old 11-11-18, 04:54 AM
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Would something like extension lug nuts work on your rims. Look at this site at pictures second row down they start.
https://www.lugnutguys.com/category/lug-nuts/mag
 
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Old 11-11-18, 07:18 PM
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Update

o I decided to try it out and see if it did and the lug nuts sit flushed on the wheel studs with out any modifications. Does 7 full rotations
 
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Old 11-11-18, 07:21 PM
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Thank you!

I just want to take this moment to thank everyone who gave me advice on this phone I usually don't use forms but I was advised that I should and I really do appreciate everyone and their comments / opinions. they have eyes I'm on my phone doing this so I can't exactly thank everyone individually so hashtag everyone
 
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