2007 Ford Taurus A/C diagnosis

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Old 06-28-19, 06:51 AM
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2007 Ford Taurus A/C diagnosis

I have a 2007 ford taurus that has an ac leak this system is completely empty since i got it so i went a got some ac system uv die and a can off ac and added the uv die in to my guage and hooked up the can like usual so i started my car and tried to put refigerant in to it but it ended up just waisting all the refigerant the pump,never came on or nothing ive tried this twice after checking my guages for leaks I'm kinda confused on where to go diagnosing from here should i have pulled a vacume on it first befor adding any refigerant?
 
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Old 06-28-19, 01:03 PM
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pressure may not be high enough for the compressor to come on if it has a 2 pin low pressure cycling switch on the accumulator/drier you can often jumper the connector to get the compressor to come on at a lower pressure.
the reason you pull a vacuum is to remove air from the system as it will cause excessively high a/c pressures so it is important, but if your only adding a little Freon and dye to find the leak and fix the leak you will need to pull a vacuum prior to filling the system.
 
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Old 08-11-19, 06:27 AM
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Vacuum is for removing moisture from an a/c system and for verifying you don't have a large leak. You really need manifold gauges to properly work on an a/c system. The manifold gauge set would allow you to add your refrigerant/dye into the high and low side at the same time until the system pressure neutralizes. After neutralization you would need to jump the low pressure switch for the compressor to activate and draw the recommended amount of refrigerant/dye into the system.
 
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Old 08-11-19, 07:38 AM
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No one refills a leaking system. It is pointless. System has to be diagnosed and re sealed first. Might as well burn money in a bonfire.
Leak has to be determined with say UV dye. Then, leaking component either mended or replaced.
Only AFTER system has to be cleaned and refilled.
 
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Old 08-11-19, 11:02 AM
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UV dye is usless if the system is not pressurized. I would be looking for an oily spot initially as far as a leak goes because more times than not the leak is caused by a faulty o ring. Then flush the system with denatured alcohol, pull a vacuum for about an hour to remove moisture, pressurize the system fully along with some dye. If you do not flush and vacuum the system before charging the system you run the risk of damaging the compressor by circulating particles that have formed from the system being open or flat for a length of time. At this point you should be able to find the leak. It easier in the dark with the fluorescent light. When the system is re-opened for the repair make sure you have a new drier to install along with a new orifice tube or expansion valve. You again pull vacuum to remove moisture that has entered the system due to being opened up and to verify the leak is fixed. Recharge your system with the recommended amount of refrigerant and oil and you should be good to go. Its just part of the repair to lose the refrigerant in determining where your leak is unless you have a recovery system but refrigerant isn't that expensive. There isn't enough pressure in an a/c system to find the leak only by injecting dye into a flat system.
 

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Old 08-11-19, 07:25 PM
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since the original post was in june good chance its already been fixed.
not sure I agree with everything you say but yes if you add dye the system needs to be running and circulating the dye around for it to work usually works well for finding slower leaks where a visual and leak detector is not picking up anything in such cases for a customer I would probably fully charge the system so they would have a/c while they was driving it while the dye had a chance to leak out till they brought the vehicle back.
but if the system is empty it should be a fairly easy leak to find most cars usually never leak out all there Freon and usually have atleast some pressure in the system unless there condensor got hit by a rock or something weird happened and he was unable to add dye and Freon also so not sure if he was ever really connected to even read pressure to begin with.
unfortunately most people do just go buy a recharge kit or simple low side charging hose with one gauge and if it works great but all to often it doesn't.
 
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