Impact Socket stuck on bolt (Lug)

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Old 11-25-19, 12:50 PM
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Impact Socket stuck on bolt (Lug)

I was replacing winter tires of my Toyota Corolla 2009 car, with newly bought Mastercraft Air Tools (Impact Wrench) and Maximum Impact Socket set.

I was using 13/16 socket (I also googled its correct size) and it was exact size (not loose at all), when i use this socket with impact wrench or hand torque wrench socket gets stuck very badly, each time i have to use hammer to hit the socket that makes it loose enough that i could take it out.

I'm not sure if Maximum socket size is not enough accurate or something else, any work around that can make it easy, i attached the image.
 
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Old 11-25-19, 12:58 PM
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According to my research..... those are 21mm lugs. That would require a deep metric socket.
Size: M12 x 1.50. Hex Size: 21 mm. Seat Angle: 60 Deg.
 
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Old 11-25-19, 02:22 PM
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would probably consider replacing the lug nuts they do get worn over time and causes the socket to turn more and stick to the nut, while it may be metric in my experience there really is little difference between the 21 and 13/16 the 21 would just fit a little looser and probably get stuck also.
 
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Old 11-25-19, 03:06 PM
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Nuts are in good shape, that's really disappointing to know that they (Maximum) did not put all sizes in 150 pcs socket set. Can someone advise which socket set would be better choice in Canada, I will be using with air tools. thanks
 
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Old 11-25-19, 03:46 PM
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You should not use impact tools for lug nuts, yes I realize everybody does, but as an ex-brake engineer for OEM you can warp rotors by over torquing lug nuts.

You should be using a torque wrench with proper torque, approx 100 ft lb, which is sufficient to keep wheels securely intact and low enough that you never need to use an impact tool to remove!
 
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Old 11-25-19, 04:03 PM
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Hit it with a hammer. Very common problem we ran into at tire shop. A little rust, wrong socket will do this. !3/16 = 21mm 3/4 = 19mm are very close.
 
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Old 11-25-19, 05:31 PM
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You should not use impact tools for lug nuts, yes I realize everybody does, but as an ex-brake engineer for OEM you can warp rotors by over torquing lug nuts.

You should be using a torque wrench with proper torque, approx 100 ft lb, which is sufficient to keep wheels securely intact and low enough that you never need to use an impact tool to remove!
I agree. I only use an impact to take lugs off, never to put them on. I snug them up with a ratchet then lower the vehicle just enough so the tire grips the ground, and finish them off with a torque wrench. 100 ft lbs would be a little high for an aluminum wheel IMO. The wheels on my Acura have a spec of only 76 ft-lbs. However, 100 ft-lbs+ should be fine on a steel wheel like that.
 
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Old 11-26-19, 06:13 AM
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I suggest tightening lug nuts manually with your hand halfway on the lug wrench handle.

Then if you have to change a tire on the road you should have no difficulty undoing the luig nuts iwht your hand all the way at the end of the lug wrench,

If you have to jump on the lug wrench to undo the nuts then the nuts are far too tight.
 
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Old 11-26-19, 07:52 AM
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You should be using a torque wrench with proper torque, approx 100 ft lb, which is sufficient to keep wheels securely intact and low enough that you never need to use an impact tool to remove!
I can see some adjustments on impact wrench, i believe its for adjusting torque, but when i try to find in manual i could not find any description, I'm using Mastercraft Air Tools its rated for 470 ft lb. I'm also amazed that using those wrenches is not safe because at workshops i saw them everywhere being used for this job. BTW can we change the torque by reducing the air pressure?

13/16 = 21mm 3/4 = 19mm are very close.
I tried 21mm socket its a little loose, i believe could be used with torque wrench (hand tool) but not with impact wrench.
 
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Old 11-26-19, 09:54 AM
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I snug them up with a ratchet then lower the vehicle just enough so the tire grips the ground, and finish them off with a torque wrench
Almost exactly what my father did-
"lower the tire so it just touches the ground, then lower the jack 5-clicks (yes, a bumper jack*) THEN tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern...

One difference, I was taught to always spin the lug nuts on by hand - if they DON'T spin freely, then you had to wire brush the stud and ream the nut with a battery terminal brush to clean off the threads...

*- if you had a tire-iron/jack-handle weight and placement JUST RIGHT
you could get the tire iron to bounce up and down,
basically the car would jack-itself-down to the ground for you
 
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Old 11-26-19, 09:54 AM
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also amazed that using those wrenches is not safe because at workshops i saw them everywhere being used for this job
Every time I was in a dealership and saw/heard that impact wrench being used I would remind the service manager about the requirement, typ with a deer-in-the-headlamp-stare!

From the GM service procedures!


Improper wheel nut tightening can lead to brake pulsation and rotor damage. In order to avoid additional brake repairs, evenly tighten the wheel nuts to the proper torque specification



You dont get proper torque using a pneumatic gun!
 
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Old 11-26-19, 01:01 PM
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they do make torque sticks for impacts so you do not overtighten them some shops use them but really if you just using the impact for a second to snug up the wheel follow up with a torque wrench never really had any issues.
if applying torque in the opposite direction loosens the socket on the nut its usually caused by wear on the nut really there not very expensive local parts store should have them in stock.
 
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Old 11-26-19, 03:27 PM
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If 13/16 (0.812 thousandths) socket fits loose, a 21mm (0.840 thousandths) socket will even be looser. Using a micrometer or a digital vernier, measure distance across flats on lugs and get correct socket or get new lug nuts and socket that measure the same distance across flats.
 
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Old 11-26-19, 03:55 PM
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I was using 13/16 socket (I also googled its correct size) and it was exact size (not loose at all), when i use this socket with impact wrench or hand torque wrench socket gets stuck very badly, each time i have to use hammer to hit the socket that makes it loose enough that i could take it out.

I never saw it mentioned whether this was a 6 point or 12 point socket, I am assuming it was 12 point. Many years ago we always used 6 point sockets to remove lug nuts.
 
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Old 11-26-19, 04:50 PM
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Most tire shops will require the tech to use a torque wrench to tighten lugs. they will run the lugs in with a air wrench and than lower car and go around car with torque wrench. One reason is for wheel off after working on car. Was a firing offence for us it not using torque wrench.
 
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Old 12-06-19, 05:55 PM
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My tire shop changes my tires from standard to snow treads for me each year. I specify to them the manufactuers torque for these (120 ft pds) and they generally get it close but still is a bear to remove in an emergency, I bought a Milwaukee electric M18 and THAT gets the lugs off for me when I need it!
 
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Old 12-07-19, 07:17 AM
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Where does it say to use 13/16" socket on Toyota wheel nuts ? It should be 21mm.
You are working with 10yr old rusted wheel nuts and that is the cause of the loose 21mm fit (I know, I live in Canada and the salt will rust a 21mm down to 19mm in 10yrs)
Get new nuts, get the right socket AND DON'T TIGHTEN THEM WITH THE IMPACT.
 
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Old 12-07-19, 08:56 AM
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They put them on tight so that they do not fall off.
Better too tight than coming loose.
A good tire shop will torque them and then want you back in a couple days to check/re-torque them.

Personally I carry a 2.5 foot heavy wall pipe in the car as the little tire wrench they give you these days is inadequate to say the least.
Never had a tire I could not get off.
 
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