Removing old gasoline from a 1993 Chevy S-10 Blazer


  #1  
Old 11-08-20, 09:30 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 250
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Removing old gasoline from a 1993 Chevy S-10 Blazer

I have a 93 Chevy S-10 Blazer that has been sitting for a year and a half so Im sure the fuel has gone bad. I charged the battery and bumped it and it started big I immediately shut it back down. Rather than siphon the fuel, Id like to use the fuel pump to empty it out. When the key is turned on, the electric fuel pump in the fuel tank comes on to pressure up the fuel line. When it reaches full pressure, it shuts off (assuming via pressure switch).
Heres my idea.... Im thinking I can disconnect the fuel line where it hooks to the engine and rig up a hose from there. When I turn the key on, the fuel pump should come on (and not reach pressure) and pump all of the fuel out of the tank. I can chase it with a small amount of fresh fuel, change the fuel filter and be back in business. Will this work?
 
  #2  
Old 11-09-20, 02:57 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 7,518
Received 537 Votes on 497 Posts
Just get a piece of hose or a siphon kit and remove via the fill hose.

Easier and safer!
 
  #3  
Old 11-09-20, 02:59 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,243
Received 429 Votes on 383 Posts
Not sure I'd want to run potentially bad gas thru your fuel pump. I'd remove the line at the tank and siphon out what I could. Inspect the old fuel to see if it has a bad odor or is gummy, if not add fresh gas and you should be good to go.
 
  #4  
Old 11-09-20, 07:45 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 250
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I thought about siphoning but afraid Ill leave a heel and not get it all. If I use the pump Im confident I can pump the tank completely empty. I was just wondering if anyone else had tried this.
 
  #5  
Old 11-09-20, 08:31 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,243
Received 429 Votes on 383 Posts
If you inspect the gas that comes out you can have a good idea of what gets left behind looks like. The only way to completely clean the tank would be to remove it and flush it out. What gets left behind will be diluted by the new gas and any deposits would be caught by the fuel filter.
 
  #6  
Old 11-13-20, 06:44 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,045
Received 28 Votes on 22 Posts
Fuel doesn't necessarily go bad in 1-1/2 years in a sealed system. If it started as soon as you "bumped it", then I'd use that fuel and add fresh after it's consumed. Change the filter after a tank or 2. I acquired a Jaguar that sat for almost 10 years, started it with a jump box. It didn't run great, but it ran. Drove it around and added fresh fuel, then did a full tune up. That V12 ran perfectly and was a blast to drive !!
 
  #7  
Old 11-13-20, 07:14 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 2,083
Received 166 Votes on 145 Posts
Don't. That's a great way to burn up an electric fuel pump. Electric pumps are often "cooled' by the gas in the tank, and running it "low" can overheat the pump. Running it "dry" WILL mobilize sludge and gunk on the bottom of the tank, suck it up, and require that you replace the fuel filter.

You MIGHT end up replacing the fuel filter, but FIRST familiarize yourself with where it is, and buy a spare fuel filter, hose clamps etc, and keep it in the cab (with tools) "just in case."
Run the truck for a few weeks, next time you do the filters/plugs/wires/tune up, THEN replace the fuel filter.

The engine started. That means the gas is doing it's job. I would add a bottle of "dry gas" and then top off the tank with the highest octane "detergent" gas you can find. Gas doesn't really go "bad" it just drops in octane and becomes harder to ignite as the lighter fuel molecules evaporate. Adding higher octane gas corrects this.
Here's an analogy - imagine a well laid outdoor campfire- set with paper, twigs, sticks, split wood and logs- easy to light with a single match. But.leave it unlit for a year and a half. The paper and twigs will have rotted away, the sticks will be wet.
"Bad" gasoline is the same issue - the smaller easier to light fuel is gone, you can't "light" a log with a match.
BUT, if you want to start it, all you really need to do is replace the paper-twigs-sticks, and, perhaps, add some starting fluid, so you have a range of fuel sizes.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 11-13-20 at 07:31 AM.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: