Wheel Warm to the Touch


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Old 04-09-21, 07:47 AM
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Wheel Warm to the Touch

1999 Honda Odyssey 205K miles
I just replaced the front rotors, calipers and pads on this Odyssey. After driving around yesterday, I noticed the wheels were warm. They're not hot, but certainly warm. Jacked up the front of the van to make sure the wheels turned freely (when in neutral since front wheel drive) and they do. We did just come out of traffic, so we braked a considerable amount. How much heat can I expect from wheels for normal driving in traffic?

I don't think the bearings are going bad, but I suppose that's something I could replace just in case. There's is no noise or play in the wheels.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 08:04 AM
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Warm wheels after braking is common. Better rotors that have enough beef on them will take more heat. Unless you hear any noise like grinding or thumping, I would not worry about. If the wheels get hot, then maybe have a look at them and make sure everything was put together correctly.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 08:14 AM
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Thank you, Norm201. I actually installed higher end rotors. This thing is old as heck, but it keeps on going. Want it to last as long as possible.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 08:34 AM
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Heat is the result of the energy being transmitted to the rotor from the force required to stop the vehicle. Perfectly normal, don't touch to rotor after you stop the car, chances are you'll burn yourself.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 09:19 AM
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Higher end rotors (and pads if you installed them as a set) hold more heat, that's what makes them high end. Hopefully you noticed shorter stopping distances in addition to higher component temps.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 09:40 AM
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High end components have nothing to do with heat absorption/retention, better brake parts use better materials (metal for rotor/materials for pads) their mass is defined by the initial OEM design so that would not change!
 
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Old 04-09-21, 03:12 PM
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We'll have to agree to disagree on this topic marq1. I maintain that brakes turn the kinetic energy of the car motion to thermal energy at the brake components. The faster you can transfer heat the faster you can stop. I respect your opinion as someone with much experience in this subject.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 03:31 PM
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I can't comment for or against either one of you, but all I know in years past rotors were a lot beefier and it wasn't all that uncommon to have then turned and get more life out of them. Not so today. The amount of metal is at bear minimum and it doesn't take much for rotors to warp.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 07:10 PM
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Perhaps my description "higher end" isn't necessarily accurate. I chose the most expensive brake components when I bought them, hoping that equated to a better product. The van has been paid for for years. If I can keep it going another 10 or so, I'll spend the money on good parts.

Took the van out again today for a while. Everything seemed to be fine. I'm guessing the traffic (lots of stopping) contributed to them being a little warmer before. So far so good but will keep an eye on them.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 07:28 PM
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I envy you. I sold my 2005 GMC van back in 2017 for a Chevy Travesty. How I wished I kept that van. I put in the best for repairs over the years. At least the guy who bought it from me appreciated it and I think is still taking good care of it. Those Chevy and CMC vans were the best. I had bought the first run in 1985 (ASTRO) had two more in between and bought the last production run in 2005 (GMC). Wish they still made them. I could carry almost anything with those vans. Now I need a trailer, can't even fit a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood in the Travesty. Inside it fits but they made the hatch opening too small to get in in there.
 
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Old 04-09-21, 07:51 PM
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if water wont sizzle on the rim then there is nothing to worry about.
 
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Old 04-10-21, 12:28 AM
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all I know in years past rotors were a lot beefier and it wasn't all that uncommon to have then turned and get more life out of them. Not so today.
To some degree your correct, at GM we had different classes of brake for different GVW ranges so a vehicle on the low end would have a slightly bigger brake system for the vehicle than a vehicle at the upper end.

But the range was not huge and there was no "excess", it all had to do with mass savings and fuel economy.

Rotors only have enough metal for one, maybe two light cuttings!
 
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Old 04-10-21, 04:19 AM
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We kept this old van around mostly for utility. The paint still looks great, interior is in excellent condition. I have an old GMC pickup but prefer the van for smaller projects around the house. Probably couldn't get $2,500 for but I absolutely love this thing, great tool to have.
 
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Old 04-10-21, 07:25 AM
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Take wheel off and look at rotor. Is it blue-ish in color? Then, it overheats. Then, calipers have to be inspected for stickiness.
 
 

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