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Changed brake pads...now my pedal seems low?


ultranacho's Avatar
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02-19-02, 06:12 PM   #1  
ultranacho
Changed brake pads...now my pedal seems low?

1995 Nissan 200sx. I changed the front brake pads after the ones that I had were starting to give funny brake noises. After changing the pads, I thoroughly bled the brake fluid to get as much air out of the system as possible. Now my brake pedal feels really really low (as if I have to push all the way down in order to start feeling resistance from the pedal). I am sure that before changing the pads the pedal felt fine. Any ideas why? Thanks in advance.

 
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02-19-02, 09:39 PM   #2  
Did you bleed the brakes at all 4 wheels? If you just bled them on the front brakes, air may have entered the lines that go the the rear brakes and they may need bleeding.

You could have a leaky brake hose or brake caliper. Check the brake fluid level often and make sure you tightened up the bleed screws well. It might help lto locate a leak by putting newspaper under the car at the brakes. Double check all bolts that you had to remove, for tightness.

Please describe the "funny noises" (squeaking, scraping, or something else?) and were the pads worn out that you replaced?

 
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02-19-02, 10:20 PM   #3  
ultranacho
Yesterday when I changed the pads I only bled the front 2 wheels. Today I did all 4, but still had the same results. I'll do what you recommended about the newspapers to check for leaks over the next few days. What confuses me though is that the brake pedal felt fine before changing the pad (suggesting that the lines relating to the brake fluid should still be fine and undamaged...).

The old brake pads were somewhat worn (not all the way to the indicator, but getting there). Noises: a high pitched screech (not too loud though) during hard brakes, and a 'rubbing' sort of noise at low speeds w/ no braking applied (all gone with the new brake pads).


Last edited by ultranacho; 02-19-02 at 10:50 PM.
 
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02-20-02, 03:49 AM   #4  
Joe_F
You either have air or have a defective master cylinder.

Do as Jeff suggested.

 
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02-20-02, 04:20 AM   #5  
joelp
If you have not reset your caliper piston correctly, you could have driven debri into your Master Cylinder that would cause it to fail. I would try flushing the master cylinder, but if that doesn't do it, you probably have damaged it.

 
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02-20-02, 05:30 AM   #6  
mooser1
normally installing front pads does not require bleeding because you never open the system, simply squeeze the caliper pistons back to insert new pads and re-install the calipers...




why were you bleeding if it wasn't needed?

just curious...

 
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02-20-02, 12:01 PM   #7  
darrell McCoy
could you by chance have gotten the flex hose twisted on one or maybe both calipers?? Just an off the wall idea.

 
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02-20-02, 05:03 PM   #8  
ultranacho
I bled all 4 wheels again today, same effect. Just wondering if I am doing this correctly...how strong would you say the flow stream should be when bleeding the brake fluid?

mooser1, those were my thoughts exactly. However, I only started the bleeding process after I noticed that the pedal seemed unusually "soft" after changing the brake pads and test driving my car around.

The brake pedal does reset to the uppermost position (I don't know if that helps, but I read another post stating this problem).

I heard that a symptom of a damaged master cylinder would be at a stoplight with your foot on the brake pedal, the pedal would slowly and gradually sink further from its braking position. If so, I am not having this problem.

Thanks all for your replies and ideas, and keep them coming if any new ideas come up.

 
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02-20-02, 09:39 PM   #9  
Joe_F
A clear and steady stream (with no spitting or squirting) should come out of each wheel.

Most of the time you work your way from the wheel furthest from the master cylinder up to the one closest to it.

 
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02-21-02, 10:06 AM   #10  
mooser1
you should make sure the rear brakes are adjusted up good when you do your bleeding, if they are out of adjustment you're pretty much wasting your time.....

just a thought...

 
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