replacing brakes

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  #1  
Old 03-22-02, 08:17 PM
Racer Girl
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Question replacing brakes

I have a '94 Ford Mustang 3.8 (V6) and everytime I step on the brakes, the emergency brake light indicator comes on. I figure that this is the warning light telling me to replace my brake pads... can anyone offer me a step by step how-to so i can do this myself??? ANY help would be appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-22-02, 11:10 PM
system
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I think the first step is check your brake fluid, because I don't think Ford mustang as similar as Bmw where they put a sensor on the front to tell you it is time to replace the brake pads.
 
  #3  
Old 03-23-02, 06:10 AM
ASE DAVE
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YES CHECK BRK FLUID FIRST, AS THE FT. BRKS WEAR DOWN THE FLUID WILL DROP, IF IT IS REAL LOW YOU NEED TO LOOK FOR A LEAK ARE TAKE A LOOK AT THE FT. PADS. ---HOW MANY MILES ARE ON THE VEH. YOU WILL GET ABOUT 40K ARE 50K ON FT. BRKS AND DOUBLE THAT ON REAR BRKS. GOOD LUCK
 
  #4  
Old 03-23-02, 06:31 AM
rickwhoo
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depends on the type of driving. stop and go or highway driving makes a big difference in how long brakes last
 
  #5  
Old 03-23-02, 08:14 AM
Joe_F
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Back to the original question:

1) Your brakes are likely worn out.
2) As mentioned, check thoroughly for a hydraulic leak in the system.
3) I would have to think if #1 were true, you are also hearing grinding and scraping as well.

As for step by steps, check the links in my signature file for some ideas, or pick up a service manual for it.
 
  #6  
Old 03-23-02, 04:02 PM
Racer Girl
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FIXED!!!

thanks guys... brake fluid did the trick... i should have though of that myself before bothering yall about it... i'm embarrased for not thinking of that.... thanks anyway!!!!
 
  #7  
Old 03-23-02, 07:39 PM
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Lightbulb

I would suggest to check the thickness of your brake pads. It maybe dangerously worn out that it may eat the rotors. Good luck on the repairs. Keep us posted.

OM
 
  #8  
Old 03-23-02, 07:42 PM
Joe_F
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I agree with OM. You're not done yet.

Something causes the fluid to be low like that. It's either a hydraulic leak or pads that are worn out causing the level to drop.

Check it out to be sure.
 
  #9  
Old 03-25-02, 02:44 AM
Ricky_lee30
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To inspect your brake pads and rotor on a 94 Mustang, you first must put blocks behind the back tires, then you must loosen the lug nuts on one of your front tires, jack up the wheel you are working with and finish removing the lug nuts from your tire. Remove the tire and you will see the brake rotor and caliper. The rotor is the big round metal disk with the studs for your tire to mount to. This is the object that your brake pads are pressed against to stop your car. There is a inside and outside face. The rotor should be smooth on the inside and outside face, almost shiny. If there are any grooves in it, you should have it turned or replaced and have new pads put on. On the rear of the rotor, toward the cab of the car, you will find a caliper, there are inspection holes between the fender wall and the rotor on the rear edge of the caliper to view the thickness of your brake pads. With a flashlight look into the inspection holes where you should see an inset area touching the rotor and a metal plate on the outside of the inset area which touches the caliper. You will see this on the inside and outside face of the rotor, these are your brake pads. There should be at least 1/8 of an inch thickness in the inset areas. If there is less you should replace your pads. To replace your pads you will need to first compress the caliper with a C-Clamp by putting the clamp on the outer brake pad and on the rear of the caliper around the backside of the rotor and tighten the clamp until it can no longer tighten, this releases the pressure from the rotor and enables you to install the new pads. Then you will need to remove the two bolts on the inside rear of the caliper with either a wrench or a torque socket and ratchet (depending on the type of hardware attaching the caliper to it's bracket) from the inside of the caliper, then you can remove the caliper from the rotor. Being careful not to break the rubber/metal brake line attached to the caliper, pull the caliper toward the cab of the car. Then you will remove the brake pads from inside of the caliper or from the faces of the rotor. Remove one at a time noting which is where and replacing them with new ones, making sure that the same shaped pad with the pad portion or smaller part of the pad facing the rotor or the inside of the caliper. The pads should face eachother. Then you can put the caliper back onto the rotor, put the bolts back into place and tightening them as tight as you can. Put your wheel back on, tighten all of the lug nuts as tight as you can, lower the jack, torque your wheel nuts to 100 ft lbs. and pump your brakes until they stop fading to the floor when you press the brake pedal. Then start all over on the other front wheel. After the other side is done, check your brake fluid reservoir and fill to the proper level, repump your brake pedal until it stops fading to the floor under foot pressure. Viola, you are done.

Good-luck
 

Last edited by Ricky_lee30; 03-25-02 at 03:09 AM.
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