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manually rotating an engine


elihu's Avatar
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03-28-02, 11:34 AM   #1  
manually rotating an engine

I am attempting to replace the head gasket on my car, which in and of itself isn't so hard. the hard part is getting to where one can safely remove the cylinder heads. My manual says to manually rotate the engine 'till the #1 piston is at TDC. I haven't yet penetrated to the crankshaft, but once I get there what else do I have to know to perform this operation? Thanks.

Israel

 
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03-28-02, 11:35 AM   #2  
Joe_F
Should be able to turn the cranshaft using a heavy 1/2" breaker bar and the proper socket to rotate it to the desired location.

Might have to put a section of pipe on there for leverage.

 
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03-28-02, 11:54 AM   #3  
Thanks again!

Israel

 
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03-28-02, 12:44 PM   #4  
xiii13
Taking the spark plugs out will make it a lot easier to turn over.

 
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03-28-02, 09:19 PM   #5  
I'll keep this in mind. I stopped for the day. I was having trouble with the timing belt. Now do I turn the crankshaft clockwise or counterclock wise? Thanks.

Israel

 
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03-28-02, 10:23 PM   #6  
On this 2.5 liter, you turn it clockwise. When you re-install the timing belt, there is a special tool reccomended for use to set the correct tension on the tensioner pulley. Many people have gotten away without using one, but you don't want too much tension on it...yet you don't want too little either.


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God bless!

 
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03-28-02, 10:37 PM   #7  
I appreciate the responses I'm getting, and am making notes of them. The marks on the camshaft sprocket are not as described in the manual. It describes two marks that should line up horizontally, but there's only one. What's up?! My manual is elusive as to how I determine TDC. I'm going to ask them online and see what I get.

Israel

 
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03-28-02, 10:47 PM   #8  
If I remember correctly, you must look through the hole next to the mark on the camshaft sprocket, then you will see the mark cast on the head. It's been a while since I did this procedure.


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03-28-02, 10:52 PM   #9  
Very interesting. Look thru the hole next to the mark and look for the a mark cast on which head?

Is

 
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03-28-02, 10:58 PM   #10  
On the cylinder head(only one) behind the cam pulley. In other words, there is a hole in the cam pulley, next to the alignment mark. When the cam is in the proper position, you will see the corresponding alignment mark through the hole. It will be a mark that was cast on the metal surface of the cylinder head behind the cam pulley. (if I'm remembering this right)


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

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03-28-02, 11:02 PM   #11  
if this is on the dodge caravan 2.5liter you have a timing indicater on the top of the bellhousing on the transmission often there is a rubber cover stuck in the cutout, just turn the engine over till your marks line up to 0 and you will be at tdc, the hole in the cam sprocket should be pointing straight up and should line up with valvecover gasket end seal which has little points on it to help hold it in the valve cover, the balance shaft mark should be pointing toward your crankshaft mark when your on tdc.

 
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03-28-02, 11:07 PM   #12  
That's it!! I knew that hole was used to align it, I believe there is also a mark on the head, but it's been 8 years since I left the chrysler dealership, and my memory is not the best, lol.


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03-29-02, 04:47 AM   #13  
Thank you very much gentlemen, your advice has been very valuable. I understand, and am hopeful of accomplishing this task now. As you can guess I am quite a novice and I was discouraged from doing this, but my need is such that I see no other options. I am grateful and wish all a Happy Easter and Passover. God bless all.

Israel

 
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03-29-02, 05:29 AM   #14  
Joe_F
For better specs and procedures on this job, it's worth the 25 greens to get an Alldata.com subscription. You'll learn a lot and have better information.

I'm assuming you have a Chilton or Haynes manual and not the factory Chrysler one.

 
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04-04-02, 02:45 PM   #15  
Howdy all,

I've rotated the engine, which wasn't as hard as I thought it would be, but when I tried to loosen the cylinder head bolts I found that those are some tough bolts. My 3/8 inch rachet wrench got stripped after I applied most of the strength I've got towards loosening the first in the sequence. Before I go out and buy another I ask, Is the common reversible ratchet driver up to the job? If not, what is? I think I'm gonna have to borrow someone else's muscles. Thanks.

Israel

 
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04-04-02, 07:05 PM   #16  
Tools

When doing engine work, a 3/8" Torque and a 1/2" Torque wrench are a must. With as many variables, involved in engine building, you must follow torque sequence and values.

Sears puts together many different tool kits, at reasonable prices. The 3/8 rachet & deep & short 6 point kits alone are not enough. You must also move up to the 1/2" ratchet and sockets.

When you deduct the cost of these tools, from what you are saving by doing the job yourself, it's realistic. Also you get to keep the tools for the next job. and their cost goes down each repair you do.

Good luck
Marturo

 
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04-04-02, 07:13 PM   #17  
Joe_F
I agree with Maturo.

A reasonable Craftsman set runs under a 100 bucks. A collosal one maybe 250 and it would have every socket you could need.

Most of my tools are Craftsman and they have never let me down. Good value for the money.

That being said, time for some 1/2" drive tools.

 
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04-05-02, 03:18 AM   #18  
1/2 inch for head bolts

Yes 1/2 inch drive is the way to go for head bolts get a breaker bar to break them loose buy good tools not the cheap ones from a bargin store.If you can not buy Snap On or Proto or Mac Sears has some good ones that have a lifetime return if you break it.
I say dont scrimp on tools I am a airline mechanic and I know that if you have good quality tools you wont be sorry and your knuckles and the part you are working on wont be damaged when the socket splits.

 
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