Super Tech Motor Oil

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  #1  
Old 04-06-02, 01:32 PM
terrycc
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Super Tech Motor Oil

Hi All,
Just a quick question about automotive motor oils. Who manufactures Super Tech motor oil for Wal-Mart. Is it any good, it sure is cheaper than the other name brands.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-06-02, 03:17 PM
Joe_F
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Unknown who makes it, but it's probably a major oil company.

So long as it has the starburst logo that says "Approved for Gasoline Engines" it meets the current American Petroleum Institute (API) regulations.

Change it often and use quality filters and you'll have no problem.
 
  #3  
Old 04-06-02, 04:58 PM
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Thumbs down Beware

Wally World is known for its recycled oil Tech 2000 ect. For a few dollars more, you can buy shell & know you are getting new oil. Your engine will thank you for it
 
  #4  
Old 04-07-02, 09:08 AM
Joe_F
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I agree, but contact their corporate office first and ask. Wouldn't hurt.
 
  #5  
Old 04-07-02, 10:57 AM
Dan Meyer
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Engine Oil

I'm a Petroleum Engineer with a major oil company. First, the star burst logo on a can doesn't mean a quality oil (it could be recyled oil). Wal-mart , Sears, Murray's, Autozone, go out for bids for what is called "private label". They buy from the company who bids the lowest and they don't much care about quality. Stay away from any private labels. Buy only the major brands: Texaco, Mobil,, Exxon, Shell, Amoco. NO Castrol, Quaker State, Wolfshead, they just buy the components, blend them and put their name on the bottle. They don't have the research and technical expertise that the majors do.
 
  #6  
Old 04-07-02, 12:31 PM
Joe_F
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I disagree. It all depends.

The API logo means it meets the minimum quality standards set forth. Most times it says "exceeds manufacturer's specifications for shear strength, etc"

That being said, Sears oil was Sunoco's at one time . I have bought it recently. It is Warren Petroleum of Nebraska I believe now.

That being said, additionally, factory fill in most cars IS one of these brands. Goodwrench/GM doesn't make their own oil. Nissan uses Citgo as factory fill.

I have used all the better brands and use whatever's on sale and change it frequently and follow the severe service category for maintenance as I do city and mixed driving. No oil related problems

What company do you work for? Just curious.
 
  #7  
Old 04-07-02, 03:13 PM
Dan Meyer
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Don't believe everything you read on the bottle. Would you put reclaimed oil in your car?? It would have the same logo and wording. Or from a company who doesn't do any research or technical work on engine oil but buys the ingredients from a major oil company or a additive supplier and puts their label on it
.
I did work with the inititial fill engine oil with Ford, GM and Chrysler. None of them use off the shelf oil for initial fill. They all have their own formulations to which the oil companies bid on. Same with gear oils, chassis grease etc.

Warren Petroleum is not a manufacturer of oils. They may be a repackager. Sears awards the oil business to the lowest bidder and if that company doesn't do it's own packaging then they contract it out to another company.

I don't want to say who I work for because I may tell some things about the oil business that wouldn't be too good for my career. I will say that I work for one of the 3 largest major oil companies.
I'm grateful to those of you who give your time for free to help us back alley mechanics who work on their own cars. I just hope I can return the favor.
 
  #8  
Old 04-07-02, 05:32 PM
Joe_F
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Ok, we'll leave it at that.

Then, what you are saying is that the API logo means nothing. I find that hard to believe.

It shows minimum performance requirements for motor oil. That means it would have to meet certain standards. Shear strength, vaporization, etc. I saw a study done once on oil and quality that was posted on the internet. The differences between the premium oil and the average Superflo, Mobil, Citgo, etc were not great.

TowGuy of this forum uses Sam's Club oil in his wrecker in the Florida heat. No problems yet at 250k as I recall. .

I generally use: Exxon Superflo, Mobil (in the blue can), Havoline, Sears/Spectrum (which is priced higher than the former two BTW), Citgo or any oil that meets the API rating for my cars. I'll use Valvoline, Quaker, Penzzoil or any of the other major brands out there. You have to remember that in 1979, SE motor oil was approved for my Pontiac. Now it's up to SJ . Today's oil is vastly better than yesteryears.

If you don't believe the facts on the oil bottle, then you wouldn't use Mobil 1. In fact, GM wouldn't either in the Corvette or as an option on the F car. They say it is superior to conventional oil and it reduces wear and oil consumption . It is also API approved in the same category as conventional oil.

Perhaps maybe what I'm driving at is why is the API logo there and what does it mean then if not the minimum oil quality level.

Most oils say on them (including the Sears): "Exceeds manufacturer requirements".

I'd be interested to hear your answer.
 
  #9  
Old 04-07-02, 05:40 PM
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Just maybe Dan did Joe.

I get it Dan. So will Joe after he thinks about it for a while.

Be careful good jobs are hard to come by today.

I don't want to say who I work for because I may tell some things about the oil business that wouldn't be too good for my career. I will say that I work for one of the 3 largest major oil companies

What can you tell me about Amzoil? I kind of like their double filteration system.
 
  #10  
Old 04-07-02, 05:45 PM
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Hey, Joe, didn't we do this routine about six months ago???

Wrecker #1 ('94 W-4 gas) now has 305k (had to short block it @ about 120k for a non-oil-related failure so the bottom end has about 185k). Truck #2 ('99 NPR Gas) pushing 100k.

We also use Sam's atf fluid, wrecker #1 has had tranny opened up one time (at approx 90k) for a cracked piston (which our tranny expert says is standard failure mode and mileage on our particular trans), so the tranny has roughly 215k of trouble-free operation.
 
  #11  
Old 04-07-02, 05:52 PM
Joe_F
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I believe we did

Now I'm not advocating you go out and buy the cheapest stuff you can find, I'm saying read the bottle and compare. And compare to others as well.

It's not so much as how often you change it (I do mine every 3mo/3000 miles because I do city driving) so much as buying the most expensive on the shelf. The cost involved might be due to packaging, marketing, overhead, etc.

I would say TowGuy qualifies as severe service:

1) Heat
2) Towing
3) Stress.
4) Idling
5) High speed operation
6) Commercial use.

I can usually get the major company brands of oil for about 60 cents a quart after a 4 buck rebate.

I'm curious to know about the API logo if it does not mean minimum oil quality. If you look in most owner's manuals it says, "Only use oil with the starbust logo like this".That being said, there has to be a quality level associated with it.

And yes, you can still get SA/SB oil in some parts store. Mine carries it along with better quality oil. Lol.
 
  #12  
Old 04-07-02, 06:13 PM
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What is the point

Hi tow guy
So you use Sams oil & I am looking into Amzoil. With a double filtration 1 filter takes it down to 5 microns & one takes the over flow (Unfiltered flow back oil) down to sub micron levels.

I used to use an oil, called Full bore Synthetic 2 cycle oil when I raced in some of the enduros, that Haps Cycle sales put on around different parts of Fla.

It was mixed in my fuel tank, when a bunch of white caps called the law on us, for riding our bikes down at Midnight Pass. Any of these places sound familiar to you?

Is Island Park still there? SHS class of 68.

Anyway Oil is not the problem, nope it's allways been the color in the oil that hurts us. Just maybe we ought to be talking about, better ways to keep our oil cleaner.

How would you like to have clear oil for 20,000 miles? I would & just happen to think that if, one Co. can come out with a beter filter system , so can they all.

Why so many brands of oil? Well you could turn that around and ask. Why so many brands of beer? Is it because we buy it?
Marturo
 
  #13  
Old 04-07-02, 06:14 PM
Joe_F
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This link should make for some interesting reading:

http://www.oilexpress.com/docs/faqs.htm

The part about the NYC Taxis is the most interesting . NYC taxis see some pretty severe service .

Also from Amsoil's website:

http://www.xl7500.com/cars.htm

It talks about the starburst meaning that the oil meets the minimum quality standard set forth by that API class. That being said, most oils state they exceed certain standards.

Use API rated oil, with good filter and go 3mo/3k and you'll be fine. It also gives you a chance to check things while you are under the car and avoid problems. That being said, it is just as cheap to do an oil change than to leave it in there for an "extended drain interval" and take a risk later on.
 
  #14  
Old 04-07-02, 06:39 PM
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Joe when did this Starburst thing come out? Thanks for the ANSOIL link


The "starburst" performance specification is widely used in the United States and is a minimum quality standard. Many "starburst" oils are formulated to just meet the standard and once met, the oil manufacturer has no incentive to change the formulation. In fact, they face a major disincentive to do so – cost. Each new formulation must undergo the entire test protocol before it may be assigned the "starburst" logo. No oil marketer can bear the cost of testing without passing the cost on to its customers, and no oil marketer can afford to pass on such costs in a market as price sensitive as is the motor oil market!
Oil manufacturers' use of the "starburst" logo is voluntary. AMSOIL, who is dedicated to continuous product development, finds their hands tied by the "starburst" testing requirements. How ironic that a system developed to help oil keep pace with engine technology in fact hinders the development of new oil technologies! AMSOIL chooses not to use the mark (with the exception of AMSOIL XL-7500) because of its dampening effect on product research and development. This should not imply, however, that non-starburst oils perform at a level beneath that of "starburst" oils. AMSOIL XL-7500 Synthetic Motor Oils meet the quality standards signified by the "starburst" specification; all other AMSOIL Synthetic Motor Oils far exceed these standards.
 
  #15  
Old 04-07-02, 08:25 PM
Joe_F
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You're welcome Pretty recently. I believe with the last upgrade in API standards.

Fact is the starbust means the oil meets the minimum requirements.

I went out for a walk earlier and had a look as the Sears/Spectrum oil I have in the garage.

It says on front and back, "Exceeds the toughest performance and vehicle manufacturer recommendations for this API class as recommended in your owner's manual".

That being said, it states it is a quality blend of oil with additives to do all the things we want to do to perpetuate our engines .

I have seen Superflo, Havoline and others say basically the same thing . It would be interesting to see an updated oil study like the one I saw some time ago.

I don't understand why Amsoil doesn't put the logo on one oil and does on another. If I were buying it, I would pass it up because the owner's manual clearly states, "Only use oil bearing this logo in your vehicle". That being said, your goose might be cooked if you had a warranty problem .

Why put it on one and not the other if they do not believe in the system?
 
  #16  
Old 04-07-02, 09:38 PM
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Oil standards

Joe do you recall when it was SA,SB,SC, ect. each jump meant a leap in quality. What happened to the oil companies, when they have to prove they meet the mininum.

That sounds as if the oil co, came to a point where they were made by law, to meet mininum standards, how sad.

You don't know who the players are anymore, much less is it new or recycled. The main reason I was looking into amsoil is there, 2 in one filteration system. for now Iguess it's change often with a new filter.
Marturo
 
  #17  
Old 04-08-02, 03:52 AM
Joe_F
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Thumbs up

Yea, I do. Lol

"Use only SE motor oil in your 1980 Pontiac engine. SE motor oil should be available by the time you need to change your oil, sometime during 1980"----1980 Trans Am owner's manual .

I can remember using an old time punch can opener on fiber cans of Quaker State changing oil with my dad when he was alive. Many years ago. Lol.

I also remember him saying, "3mo/3k" to keep it running smooth. I still prescribe to that rule because I do city driving.
 
  #18  
Old 04-09-02, 03:40 PM
Dan Meyer
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For info.
Small oil companies (Castrol, Quaker State, Valvoline, ) don't have the research to develop their own oil. so they buy the base stock from a major oil co. and the additive package from an additive supplier such as Lubrizol, gateway, paramins or a major oil co. The additive supplier has done the testing and got the API approval meeting the MINIMUM standards. The small oil co then buys the ingredients and puts them in their bottles and can use the logo's (Starburst, S*, etc.). Sure they say they exceed the stardards - but by how much????

There is some recyled oil that has all the approvals. Would you put reclaimed oil in your car?

A major oil co has the research and money to continually improve their engine oils and they do. I ONLY buy major brand engine oil because I know it is the best quality I can get and they can give. A small oil co. isn't going to spend the money to buy a better formulation when the one they have meets the MINIMUM STANDARDS!!!

Amsoil is a synthetic oil blended by a Wisconsin co. synthetic oil is good for very, very low temp. start ups. It hasn't been proven that it provides any better qualities than conventional oils. Why pay extra for something that doesn't provide anything extra?
 
  #19  
Old 04-09-02, 08:35 PM
Joe_F
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Dan,

I normally would agree, but the CR test ratings on the NYC cabs are pretty convincing. They show virtually no difference between the brands.

I wish I could dig up that study I found on the 'net some time ago. It was very good. Most of the "better" brands (including the ones you buy in retailers) scored in the same range as the "premium" ones.

I have not had any oil problems in all the years in my cars, because the main thing is MAINTENANCE more so than just throwing money at the problem .

That being said, I don't think Mobil 1 would be factory fill on Corvettes and some F body cars (Camaro and Firebird) if it didn't make a difference in those engines. GM would not want to put more expensive oil in a car if they didn't need to. On most engines, I do not think you will see a difference in oil by using synthetic. Putting it in an old car is a waste of time, the damage has been long done. You will not "fix" it. You might buy time if anything.

If a car is poorly maintained, it's not likely that a major oil company's brand will save it over a "small" guy. On the other hand, a car well maintained shouldn't matter. You have to remember that the oil I'm putting in today is light years ahead of anything in 1980 when SE was the "standard". Even there, we already have an improvement!

As for recycled items, it depends on the quality level and the price. What's the difference in price? I can tell you today's GM rebuilt 700R4 is light years ahead of an NOS GM new unit sitting on a dealer's shelf. Better internals, better parts, better quality.

Some rebuilt things are improvements over the originals.

What do you think about the CR studies on the cabs? Just curious.
 
  #20  
Old 04-09-02, 10:12 PM
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Synthetic Oils

Hi Dan,

While I still think, it is the cutting fluid, that oil turns into, that does the damage. I am using Mobil 1, 15 W 50 in my tricked out 350,& of course, I am not going to tear it down, every year and Mic it to check for, less wear lol.

One thing I have noticed is, if you have a small block Chevy, & let it sit for a week. Start it up, you get knock knock tick tick tick right off the bat, just for a moment. So I have used this oil ever since break in with Mobil 30# for the first 30 minutes & for 500 miles.

So far I only notice, that there is no knock or tick noise, at start up and the pressure is 60psi running, and 45psi at idle. Why the lack of noise at start up, I don't know, & the pressure is normal for the pump I am using. No more no less.

The reason I was interested in Amsoil, was their dual oil filter set up, one is a regular filter, the other takes the over flow oil that would be dumped, un filtered into the pan, & runs it through a sub micron particle filter, that filters, 6 gallons of oil at 40 MPH in 6 miles.

Dan, is there petrolem oil that is called Synthetic, & a non petrolem base oil, that is called Synthetic? If all Synthetic oil is Petrolem base. How can it be called synthetic? I mean like the gun lube I use, it is called Tetra Gun, and claims to be a copolymer. It goes on and looks wet, but drys to the touch, does not collect dirt and is good for 4 to 5 Matches, maybe more. I had used Mobil Synthetic Grease, in the Semi Auto match rifles, in the the past, it worked fine but got so dirty, it was changed after each Match.

I did read that Synthetic oils had the round Molecules all the same size. How does that make an oil based on petroleum, a Synthetic? A Copolymer sounds like it is man made not just all the round balls being the same size. It sounds like it ought to be called (ASSBO) All same size ball oil. not Synthetic.

One more thing I read, and you are who, I am asking for knowledge. After WWII the Air Force needed an oil, that would withstand the high temps of the new Jet engines. So this is when the oil Companies, developed a Synthetic oil, due to the burn off problems with regular Petroleum oils. Or so the stories go.

Thanks , Marturo
 
  #21  
Old 04-10-02, 04:59 AM
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Of course, jet engines are a whole different animal, but the point is well taken. They are dry sump systems wherein the oil is scavenged back to a separate oil tank. Average interval for an oil change would be 500-1000 hrs of operation depending on engine type and use. Also the bearing cavities are pressurized so there is no contact between combustion gases and the oil, plus there are lots fewer wear-metal parts than a typical reciprocating engine (no cam, valves, rings, lifters, etc.). Engine operating temperatures are higher of course, but the oil systems incorporate oil coolers to help regulate the temp, typically using incoming fuel as the coolant through a heat exchanger set-up.

And of course when you've got $1-10 million per engine you don't much care if the oil is $1/qt or $5/qt, even if the tank does hold 20 qts LOL.

[Never guess what I used to do for Uncle Sam, huh?]
 
  #22  
Old 04-10-02, 09:19 AM
thekeymaker
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ok anyone have a list of the companies that use new oil and recycled oil i noticed valvoline was mentioned but theres no mobil oil change places by me i want new oil in my vehicle not recycled stuff anyone know of a oil manufacturer who has a oil change to. Don,
 
  #23  
Old 04-10-02, 11:10 AM
Dan Meyer
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Boy, let me see if I can respond to all the questions:
I never saw the CR studies on the cabs. But let me say that our company has at least six cars running on test stands all the time under monitored conditions just to insure that there is the same operating conditions all the time (We have engines alone also on test stands). After so many hours, the engines are completely disassembled and each part weighed to determine amount of wear. (Of course, before the test, the engine parts are weighed).Cleanliness is also measured. I don't see how a good test could be run on cabs and be meaningful. Small oil companies don't have the resources or money to do this. Only a major co.
There are type I, II, III and IV base oil. type IV is synthetic. There is a big debate as to exactly what is a synthetic. Even the Fed. Trade Commission backed away from this one (the lawsuit between Castrol and Mobil). Type III is such a highly refined oil that Castrol calls it synthetic. Mobil said it has to be type IV.
There are three major synthetic oils: PAO poly alfa olephin, POE polyol ester, and PAG poly alfa glycol.
My understanding is that turbines use synthetic because of the cold temperatures at altitude.
Did I answer everything?
 
  #24  
Old 04-10-02, 01:15 PM
Joe_F
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The CR reports are valid if what they did is true. That is real world testing, not in a lab. Conditions change on the whim. Different drivers get in the car. Parts wear.

I'd love to see another study done of the same magnitude. It would be quite interesting.

You have acceleration, cold start, hot start. Running low on oil. Vehicles that eat oil, etc, etc.

Real world testing has no substitute, no matter how good the lab might be. Not mitigating the lab tests in any way, but the field testing is equally as, if not more important.

Companies should do more of it. They might learn something .
 
  #25  
Old 04-10-02, 01:53 PM
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Hello all, I may have been that post 6 months ago about Sam's Club oil that you guys were speaking of. For my part lets just say the last 2 Subarus that I parked both had over 250K miles on them. And they would be running today if it weren't for the rust. I think experience is the best teacher and my experience says that Sam's oil is alright.
 
  #26  
Old 04-10-02, 08:10 PM
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Re: Synthetics and turbine engines. May be lots of reasons for using synthetics in jets, but I doubt low temperature at altitude would be one of them, since you can fry eggs on the engine casings regardless of o.a.t. Actually, oil temperatures in jets may stay more stable during normal operation than the average automobile.

On the last thread we did on this subject I wondered out loud if the "major-name-brand" oil users also only used the major name brand gasolines (at 10-20 cents a gallon more). We use Mobil or Sam's club regular. Sam's is usually a couple of cents less than Mobil, but we get a 2% rebate on Mobile so it's a wash.
 
  #27  
Old 04-10-02, 11:24 PM
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Still left with more questions.

I believe that as the smoke clears (pun intended) that what I see at least, is advertizing Glitz & Glitter. I have read many so called studies, that are so sure that they are right, they leave no room for doubt.

Well that is just what I am left with is doubt, about the true study vs sales hype. I read that jet engines burned up regular oil, only to find out they don't run much hotter than an automobile engine.

The only thing I think I can believe at this point, is the molocules in oil are round, not square. Also without it I don't go very far. When it gets filled with carbon deposits it adds to wear, friction & heat.

If I understand Dan right. The factory fill oil, is like the non-canaster gun powder, that Winchester uses in it's factory ammo. That a hand loader will blow him or herself up, trying to get the same results with canister powders.

Is there an oil that comes closer to the factory fill oil, than most of the offerings on shelf we have to choose from? Or does the Auto industry say to it's oil buddies, don't make a wear free oil we gotta sell parts you know.

At this time I feel like having a favorite oil is as important as. What beer do you prefer? They all use the same ingrediants, and add a different pkg to make it taste a little different.

So in the end, just maybe I had better put more effort into keeping my oil clean, than trying to find the perfect oil. That is of course, using new oil, the right weight, and changing it out on time, everytime. Short of that. What can you believe? The guys who dumps dirt and water on a running engine. I would like to see that test, with the oil pan left on so the pump could get ahold of some of that water & dirt LOL.
 
  #28  
Old 04-11-02, 08:50 AM
Dan Meyer
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Joe_f
I am in total disagreement regarding the CR cab test about different operating conditions. I suggest that you talk to people who do testing. One of the most important things in doing a meaningful test is to make everything as constant as possible - eliminate all variables. That is extremely important. It has to be done this way in order to make a true comparison. The tests that are run on the oils to get approvals are all done exactly the same!I was able to get some information on the CR test and the petroleum industry's biggest fault of the test was the variables in operating conditions.
Turbine oil (SATO) is NOT an engine oil - there is NO comparison. It is a lubricating oil.
 
  #29  
Old 04-11-02, 09:44 AM
Joe_F
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Dan,

Unless I'm missing something, field testing like that is pretty convincing . It's real world customers, real world conditions, not lab conditions. That's how I like to see things tested.

In 1981, Cadillac introduced the 4-6-8 engine with the modulated displacement function. In theory it should have worked, after all the air line industry supposedly used it with much success.

Cadillac skipped a lot of the testing and the engine was a total albatross for them. It didn't run right, was a bear to fix, and wound up being relegated to fleet use after only a single year in production. It was the beginning of their problems.

GE had a similar problem with their refrigerator compressor. Most business schools teach this as a case study. GE figured they could use an A/C compressor for a fridge to save space in the machine. They touted this as being a real breakthrough. It was going to change things radically. In turn, a lot of field testing was skipped.

When it was said and done, GE had to eat a lot of warranties and they lost a lot of clout with frustrated consumers. Again in the lab and on paper it looked great, but the fact was that A/C compressors are not made to cycle as much as refrigerator compressors are, and in turn they burned out very quickly.

You might read some more on this in Jeff's appliance forum. I know it's a very interesting case.

What you are talking about is a controlled enviornment. Fine for the lab, but in reality the real world is not as such. There needs to be testing and documentation on both sides. One is not valid with the other. The fact that equal engines were serviced the same, pulled apart after all that mileage and the same type of driving is convincing enough for me to think there is no real measurable difference in motor oil on them of the same quality level. Otherwise you would have had a lot of failures.

Do you have a link/copy to this report? I'd like to read it. How did the petroleum industry reply? BTW: My uncle used to work for Shell for about 40 years .

Not mitigating anything you are saying, but field testing IS probably the most important testing you can do. It's the final step before the real customers actually see and use your product in the real world.
 
  #30  
Old 04-11-02, 11:04 AM
Dan Meyer
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Joe, I'm not going to dispute the fact that "real world" testing is the ultimate test. I've been in this business for over 35 years and whenever a comparison between oils is needed they are both tested and measured under exact identical conditions. Whenever oils are tested to get approval under API , Starburst, S*, etc. the tests are run EXACTLY the same. You can't put oils in cabs with different drivers, different driving conditions different engines, etc and expect to do an accurate comparision.

I'm not going to whip this subject to death. My last words are these:
I've been a Petroleum Engineer for over 35 years and I ONLY buy engine oil from major oil companies (Texaco, Mobil, Exxon, Chevron Amoco) because I know they have the resourses to make the best quality oil possible.
 
  #31  
Old 04-11-02, 11:59 AM
Joe_F
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Sure. Your balliwick to say that, and I tend to agree. I always use quality parts.

But the proof is there that a lot of these major companies have some improving to do.

The smaller guys are providing as good as a product to the consumer, meeting the standards required and eating their lunch .

If a real world study such as that cab one (if it's true) reveals that is no difference, there likely is not. Cabs are as severe as you can get with service. They run 24 hours a day in city traffic in brutal conditions. If after the same mileage all the oil shows up the same, there is likely not a big enough difference in my mind to warrant the cost difference.

Major oil companies might charge more because of the advertising and support they have to give their product. The smaller guys might run lean and mean. Who knows .

Either way, I have used a lot of brands and I do not see the difference and have had no problems either way.

Again, the real world has varying conditions and users. Many companies have realized that and advertise it as such.

Over 1 million actual fleet miles!
Chosen by the top US fleets!
Used in all government fleets under punishing conditions!

This sales talk is as a result of real world testing and how that plays into the consumer's mind .

I don't want to mitigate your experience and expertise in any way, but has your company tested all the competitive brands/samples of a given market class of motor oil? Any results?

In the company I work for, we constantly monitor what the competitors offer and many times we realize that they might be eating our lunch if we don't do one better or offer the customer a better value.
 
  #32  
Old 04-11-02, 01:04 PM
thekeymaker
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since you guys are talking about oils why was i advised not to use synthetic oil Don,
 
  #33  
Old 04-12-02, 07:26 AM
sciguyjim
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Great discussion! Thanks for helping us all to stay up to date on the oil issue. I'm always interested in seeing test results and hearing the scuttlebutt from the labs. I was in the oil industry for 8 years and though the jobs have changed, the interest hasn't. For some reason these days it's been harder for me to find detailed info and good comparisons than it was 10 years ago. If you guys know of any good tests, online or not, that I can get my hands on I'd really appreciate it!
 
  #34  
Old 04-12-02, 07:33 AM
Joe_F
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I suppose we can try "Oil Quality Studies" on www.google.com and see what comes up.
 
  #35  
Old 04-13-02, 09:02 AM
sciguyjim
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Thanks, I'll search around for that subject (and variations.)
 
  #36  
Old 04-13-02, 09:16 AM
Joe_F
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Ok and let us know what you find.
 
  #38  
Old 02-07-12, 05:53 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1
old post I know, but anyone who wants to know, all "Great Value"/Wal-Mart product are all bidded on by major companys, in this case quaker state castrol valvoline pennzoil all bid on the quanity per price value, which ever will sell wal mart their per gallon of oil cheapest in the bidding process, is sold in the super tech bottle, and the company that wins the bidding puts the same thing in the super tech bottles, if say pennzoil wins, (which is usually the one who does win each year) super tech high mileage, synthetic and regular oils will in fact be pennzoil, just with out the name and the cheaper price, pennzoil would earn much lesser per sell, but they will make money, its just who is willing to make the deal with walmart to sell at the lowest price and take the extra cash threw royalties for selling at a cheap price, without someone feeling pushed away to not buy a "name brand" like pennzoil, since they see SUPER TECH as some junk oil, but with out the public relation on the bottle, people will see pennzoil as the better buy cause of the "name brand" and then the others that just buy the cheapest oil and dont care what its called, so they make money on both ends, I know this cause i was a walmart oil and tire tech as well as management in the department, all walmart brands are like this, the bread, puddings, soups, chili, beans, all in house wal mart brands are all bidded on by the major companys and the lowest bidder wins, if you have used super tech for a long time, u have prolly used quaker state and pennzoil in ur car, those have won the bidding FOR YEARS NOW and btw, quaker state and pennzoil, are own by the same people, pennzoil uses wax, only difference
 
  #39  
Old 02-07-12, 06:21 PM
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Canada (near The Motor City)
Posts: 611
Chaz, I believe you are mis-informed on a few things in your post.
SuperTech oil is different in various parts of the US, the 2 major manufacturers are Warren and Exxon.
Yes, Quacker State and Pennzoil are SOPUS (Shell Oil Products U.S.) and Pennzoil doesn't have "wax" in it.
You can find pretty well anything "OIL" at Bob Is The Oil Guy - Forums powered by UBB.threads™
 
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