Water pump removal (broken bolt)

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  #1  
Old 04-12-02, 12:40 PM
Ransherb
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Question Water pump removal (broken bolt)

I have an 1987 Ford Taurus, 3.0 litre, V-6(front wheel drive).
When removing the old water pump, one of the bolts broke.
What`s left of the bolt is about 3/4 in. inside hole.
I`ve heard you can use something called easy outs,or extracters to get this out. Is there a certain kind or brand that is better than others?
Also it looks impossible to get a normal sized drill in...if that is the procedure.
Should I get it towed to a place where the "pro`s"can deal with it?
What would they do........and approx. cost?
Any advice or suggestions?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-12-02, 01:03 PM
Joe_F
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Those are brand names as I recall.

Any parts store or hardware store will carry those extractors. You might also find them in Sears where the tools are. Either way.

Get a new bolt and you should be all set.

Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 04-12-02, 05:01 PM
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When you drill out bolt prior to E-Z out, if you can buy a Left Handed drill bit and drill out with revesable drill. I've found great success with these. You should be able to find them at an industrial tool supply store. If you have a Grainger Supply (www.grainger.com) or McMaster Carr near you, they will have them.
 
  #4  
Old 04-12-02, 07:07 PM
Ransherb
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I`ve had some one suggest to me just to ignore the one missing bolt...just to put extra silicone around it. And slap it back together..a good idea?
Also I was wondering if a person could use a tap & die set to put threads into the metal of the inlet of the hole...and find a corresponding size bolt to fit. The orginal bolt reaches back to engine block, after going through the timing chain cover(that the water pump bolts to). Out of the 11 mounting bolts, 6 are of the long type going right through. The other 5 are shorter smaller bolts that have threads right in the timing chain cover. Could I in theory just make this one like one of those???
The car is a 1987...with 347.000km on it.....I`m not so sure I want to "fix it right"...I`m told to get this broken bolt out is a horrible expierence and costly if taken to a shop!
Thanks for the advice I appreciate it...are these above options worth considering?
 
  #5  
Old 04-12-02, 07:55 PM
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i wouldnt consider doing that it will start to leak on you eventually if it ever sealed up at all if it is a longer timing cover bolt you could also get a leak between the timing cover and block and get coolant in your oil and could ruin the engine all together.
however if you did decide to just leave the bolt out or just tap threads into the timing cover i would start looking for a replacement car as soon as possible.
usually a shop will charge whatever their hourly rate is for however long it takes to remove the bolt in cases like this it may require timing chain cover removal to fix correctly.
 
  #6  
Old 04-12-02, 10:00 PM
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bejay's right.

That's the kind of problem that's either fixed or not. If it's half-a**ed repaired you may or may not lose the engine. How much is the gamble worth to you. Eventually it will fail.
 
  #7  
Old 04-13-02, 09:53 AM
Joe_F
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I agree with Dan and BeJay. Try to fix it right. I always soak the bejesus out of those types of bolts before attempting to remove them as they fatigue quite easily.

That being said, do it right.
 
  #8  
Old 04-15-02, 11:58 AM
Ransherb
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Thanks for the help and advice.
I must ask just one more thing then...to avoid crap like this in the future; it was suggested to spray or soak your fasteners...with what? WD-40....or is there a better brand? Also how does this"juice" make it to the threads way back, when you can only spray the head of the bolt?
Would it be wise when encountering any "stiff" bolt to get some kind of torch (even propane) to heat it up abit? Would heating cause aluminum or certains metals to warp? Or is a guy ok as long as there is no gas lines, wires. etc. around?
As you can see I really don`t want to break any-more fasteners! Any tips appreciated!
Again I thank all of you....great advice!
 
  #9  
Old 04-15-02, 05:28 PM
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well wd-40 works ok if you can get the bolt started out a little to where it will soak into the threads in a long bolt such as this case it may of not helped, also tapping on the head of the bolt with a hammer before you even try turning it will help loosen the rust around the threads.
sometimes no matter what you do you will still end up breaking the bolt off but not as often.
 
  #10  
Old 04-16-02, 06:03 AM
Joe_F
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PB Blaster is a good pentrating oil and there are other industrial ones out on the market.

WD40 works rather well in most cases though and is readily available .
 
  #11  
Old 04-16-02, 10:04 AM
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To avoid this in the future, when you go back with your bolts, apply an anti-seize lubricant to the threads. You should be able to get this at any parts store.
 
  #12  
Old 04-16-02, 01:41 PM
Billdo49er
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Some water pump bolts screw into the water jackets.So rather than never seize it may be wiser to use pipe dope with teflon.
 
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