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Auto Air Conditioning


thiggy's Avatar
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Join Date: May 2002
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05-08-02, 04:42 AM   #1  
Auto Air Conditioning

The A/C unit in my wife's 91 Escort wagon has for the last couple of years had a slight leak. Each spring it would be a little low and I would have to add a can of R-12. Well as I prepared to add my usual a few weeks ago, I noticed the guages showed zero pressure, both high and low side. I cracked my tank open and let a small amount in for test purposes (can't afford to throw away too much of that valuable stuff). According to my Freon leak sniffer, the leak seemed to originate from the compressor, but I couldn't pin it down due to the inaccessability of the unit (under other engine components). I plan on having my regular mechanic repair the A/C, but am uncertain what to do about the Freon. My mechanic will charge $125 to change over to R-134 which will simplify future A/C work, however, I have about 15 lbs of R-12 (7 or 8 cans, plus about 7 or 8 lbs remaining in a 15 lb tank. I can supply my own Freon and save the change-over charge. What would be more advantageous? Is the R-12 preferable to the R-134? I have wondered if there is any market for the R-12 and if so, what is the going price? Any suggestions would be appreciated

 
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05-08-02, 04:54 AM   #2  
I dunno...

Ford (*shudder*) is notorious for lousy AC units, especially early 90 models. My wife' s 90 mustang's AC lost a ton of freon every year. What was happening was a lousy designed O-ring that was subjected to an inordinate amount of motor vibration, causing failure when combined with the pressure of the freon inside. MORONS!!!!!!


As far as how to fix it, the easiest solution, and probably the most cost effective, is to trade that Ford for a GM. My wife now has a 2000 Cavalier that hasn't been to the shop yet (other than replacing a warped brake rotor) and it already has 70K miles.

As far as the freon, I'd like to know the answer to your question b/c my dad passed away and I found an old, full can of R12 I didn't know he had.

 
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05-08-02, 05:42 AM   #3  
Joe_F
Keep it R12. You have half the battle won, that is you have R12.

However, unless you have a certificate, it is technically illegal for you to putz around with it. Technically, but you already own the R12.

Work with a shop that will find and correct the leak and let them know you do have R12 and would they mind using it. That should save you some money.

 
thiggy's Avatar
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05-08-02, 05:57 AM   #4  
Joe F - I actually do have the certificate. I just got it so I could stock up on R-12, but the price skyrocketed about the time I received my certificate, so I never did purchase more than I already had on hand from prior to the time that it was regulated.

 
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05-08-02, 06:13 AM   #5  
Joe_F
Ok, then you're ok.

Stick with R12 in a car that originally had it. It's better off. However, find and correct the leak or you will continue to waste it.

If you have to "top off" yearly, that means there is a leak. And as mentioned, Fords are notorious for leaks around those snap ring connectors of theirs. The pits!

 
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05-08-02, 07:49 PM   #6  
GlassesRx
R-12

Stick with the R-12...I switched over to the R-134 and it's horrible. It just doesn't get as cold as the R-12. I had a mechanic do it for me so they can pull a vacuum in the system to remove all the old R-12 to put the new R-134. Geee..I wish I was that lucky to have some R-12.

 
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