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Reading the Engine Codes


bculli05's Avatar
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05-17-02, 11:09 AM   #1  
Reading the Engine Codes

Hi All,
I have a buddy with a 88 Ford Mustang 4 cyl turbo that after it goes into closed loop starts stumbling during idle but picks back up and runs fine around 2,000-2,500 RPM. Anyways, I would like to see if there are and codes in history as the check engine light is not currently on but I am not familar with how to check ford codes. Could anyone help me with this?
Thanks,

Brian

 
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05-17-02, 11:18 AM   #2  
Joe_F
See the links in my signature file.

 
bculli05's Avatar
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05-17-02, 11:47 AM   #3  
OK, the closest I could come to getting an answer from your signature file was the batauto.com. I am looking for a procedure for retreiving the trouble codes not the codes themselves. Any other suggestions? Again, this is a 88 mustang with a 2.3L

 
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05-17-02, 03:24 PM   #4  
Joe_F
Ya, as mentioned before, Knuckles website has the codes AND the procedure for pulling the codes:

http://www.batauto.com/Ford.html

 
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05-17-02, 04:24 PM   #5  
trendar
there's a test connector in the engine compartment, which you can read the codes from, using an analog voltmeter, hooked up between the self test output (STO) pin and battery voltage.

The self test is started by grounding the self test input (STI) lead, and then counting the pulse output from the self test connector to read the codes. Four pulses followed by a pause, and then a single pulse, or 4-1, would represent a code 41, for example.

A go condition is 1-1; any other codes would be a failure. A 1-0 is a separator code between sections of the self test (one pulse, then nothing).

There's a Key On Engine Off (KOEO) test which is run with the ignition in the run position, but not started, and a Key On Engine Running test, which you would run on a warmed up car.

Continuous codes are read out in the Key On Engine Off test, in the second part after the 1-0 separator code. These are codes that represent codes latched during the last 40 cycles, and help identify intermittent conditions. They can be cleared by disconnecting the STI ground while the codes are being outputted, so that it won't display codes that were corrected previously.

Here's some pictures of the connector to help you find it in the engine compartment-
pictures of S/T connector

 
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05-17-02, 11:32 PM   #6  
knuckles
EEC-IV

Dalidesign has the best info on the web RE: EEC-IV troubleshooting.

 
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05-18-02, 01:50 PM   #7  
Some auto parts places will run a code check for you for free. Auto Zone for one is advertising that service.

 
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05-18-02, 02:00 PM   #8  
trendar
That's true; I saw a banner in their window when I went to the local Auto Zone; might be the easiest way to go.

You still might want to poke around beforehand to locate the connector though; don't know if they lend you the code reader or if they do it for you.

 
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