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Another 89' toyota pickup


Lewis's Avatar
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05-23-02, 07:37 PM   #1  
Lewis
Dang- 89' toyota pickup

Hello, I've got an 89' Toy 4x4 3.0 liter V6,with 180,000 miles that I recently blew the head gasket on. I have torn it apart, got a professional to do the valve job, and put it back together. My problem is that upon working on it I realized that I did not have the engine at top-dead-center of piston #one. With the distributor out and the camshafts out as well. I'm not sure I put it back together right. I lined up the marks on the camshafts to 12 o'clock and the crankshaft to zero. The Haynes book that I used to help me get through this said that I have to be at top-dead-center on the compression stroke but, how can I tell that I'm on the compression stroke. When I tried to start the engine to see how I had done it will only run shortly. Playing with the distributor I got the engine to run for five seconds or so, but then when I give it gas it seems to almost cause it to die. Also, I cannot tell by the book what the gap between the cam lopes and the shim's are suppose to be a couple of them have a gap of .006 with a feeler gauge. The book also said to check air leaks on the intake manifold and for vacuum leaks but I could not find any. Hopefully you guys can give me some ideas.

P.S. I wrote new message at the bottom of this one(Scroll Down and you'll see it) in reply to some advice I was given.


Last edited by Lewis; 05-24-02 at 09:08 PM.
 
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Joe_F's Avatar
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05-24-02, 08:16 AM   #2  
Joe_F
The Haynes manual is hokey at best and only good for the basics. A better thing to get is the alldata.com subscription, or still better, the factory OEM manual.

In lieu of that, you might try www.autolibrary.org.

Did you change the timing components when you did the repair?

I think you did it correctly or else it probably wouldn't run. Make sure you didn't leave anything disconnected.

 
marturo's Avatar
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05-24-02, 06:27 PM   #3  
Find TDC

Take your valve cover off and do what it takes to bring Cyl #1 up to TDC firing stroke . Then look at where your timing marks are, where you use your timing light. This will tell you if your cam timing is right.

Now take your distributor cap off and see where the pointer is, mark the body at the #1 plug wire postion.

Timing after the fact is just a mater of geting #1 piston at the fireing stroke to TDC. Then you make sure everything else is set to fire #1.

How did you check for vaccum leaks around the intake manifold? The book you have will tell you how to bring #1 up to it's firing stroke & get your distributor in time.

On a lot of engines if the timing marks are lined up that's all it takes to time the cam. The timing of the distributor is where you can get your spark timing messed up, so check it after you find TDC #1.

Have you taken a compression check yet? Don't wory about it until you see your timing marks around the other side of the pointer when you have it on TDC #1 lol. I think your cam timing is ok & you may be a tooth or 2 off on your Distributor. I still would like to know how you checked for Vac leaks around your intake

We used to use WD-40 but it has been changed so it won't rev the engine at the air leak. I use ether & I did not say that, it is very dangerous, like a spark from a wire could = Boom.

Marturo

 
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05-24-02, 09:00 PM   #4  
Lewis
Well, I sure appreciate the help and time you guys have given me. But, the chilton website was a dead-end, and I don't at the moment have money to checkout alldata.com. I really haven't checked for leaks with anything, other than making sure all the bolts to the intake manifold were tight. And I'm still not sure how to tell the difference between the compression/firing stoke and the exhaust stroke. I've really experimented with the distrubutor, with no luck. So, I might try the either to check for leaks(but with great care of course).Thanks alot for giving a frustrated DIY'er some advice. Hopefully I'll be blessed by the DIY fairy. xing fingers.

 
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05-25-02, 05:51 AM   #5  
Joe_F
Whoa Nelley.....

You need a torque wrench to tighten bolts. "Tight enough" is not good enough . Autozone for one retailer can rent you tools for free under their rental program.

An Alldata.com subscription costs 25 bucks yearly. Well worth the money to have better information to do the job (Most things are taken from the factory service manual directly anyhow).

I always buy my factory books used (internet, swapmeet, etc). I want the best information when I do a repair. In the same respect, I wouldn't go to my doctor if he was using a 14 dollar medical book to figure out how to operate on me. Lol.

 
marturo's Avatar
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05-25-02, 09:58 AM   #6  
Finding TDC #1

To find top dead center on any cylinder. You turn the engine over in the direction in the directionthe engine runs. The EX valve will go down (open) and you keep turning until the Intake valve goes down and comes back up. You should be able to insert a plastic straw or something like that (In spark plug hole) to follow the piston up as the intake valve comes back up.

When the piston is all the way up and the IN & EX valves are both up now you are at Top dead center on the firing stroke. After you have done this with cylinder #1 you should find the cut or some marks on the balencer lining up with the timing plate that should have 0 or TDC and degrees in advace & retard.

This is how you will know if your cam is timed with your crank shaft. I can't believe even Chiltons does not show you how to find TDC #1, after all this is where we all, take out & replace the distributor.

Once you find out if you have your cam timing right we can get you going very fast. This is most important, without the cam being in time, you will never get it to run.

This is really easy : At spark time, the In & ex valves are closed. The piston is forced down and as the piston comes back up the ex valve opens to let out the burned mixture. When the piston goes back down the intake valve opens to let a new mixture in. Then the intake valve closes and the piston compresses the mixture ready to fire again, at TDC of the compression stroke.

Now you know what happens at each of the four strokes. Now you need to find that 1 stroke, the compression stroke on Piston #1. Then tell us what you see down around the timing light area where the marks line up at 0 or TDC.

Did you take a compression test? Do you have spark? I would not worry about any vaccum leaks. Print this and go find TDC #1 & get back to us, then when we know if your cam timing is right or wrong and we can get started fixing the problem.

Marturo

 
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