auto painting

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  #1  
Old 06-09-02, 07:59 AM
garciarob
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auto painting

What do I need to buy to get started in auto painting? I don't need the most expensive items, but something that will perform a good quality job.
What type of compressor? Brand of Paint gun? type of paint? type of mask? hoses? etc.... I have inherited three new cars, new to me that is, and I would like to fix them up. a 66 t-bird, 73 spitfire and a 88 sunbird.
thanks for any help.
garciarob
 
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Old 06-09-02, 09:13 AM
Joe_F
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Whoa Nelley. Step away from the spray gun

The tools you start with first are books, and plenty of them. Do plenty of reading and possibly take some courses before jumping into anything.

Paint work is not a DIY type job (nor is it cheap) unless you spend some good money and invest in the right things. Paint is expensive, and prohibited in many areas now due to enviornmental regs. Body work takes time to learn and jumping in head first is a sure fire way to grenade and frustrate yourself without information.

Read up on the subject well before you dive in.
 
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Old 06-10-02, 09:36 PM
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garciarob:
Joe_F is absolutely correct.
I have prepped and painted several vehicles I have owned and can say that you have a lot to consider as to whether it's worth doing yourself.
Even though I have painted some of my projects, as a DIY'er I get better results by doing the prep work and paying someone to apply the paint.
I wouldn't discourage you from trying because it's quite a rewarding hobby, just make sure you know what you're getting into.
Post the body condition of these vehicles and maybe someone can steer you in the right direction.
 
  #4  
Old 06-12-02, 04:00 PM
garciarob
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Thumbs up

thanks for the info. I have no issues doing the body work if any is necessary. these cars in pretty good shape. I have done numerous cars, as far as body work in my 20 years of automotive training. just haven't made that step up to painting them myself. I planned on trial and error. my retirement from the military is coming up so I will have good amount of time. and I love a challenge. So I will definitely head to the books and local vendors and check before I leap. I know what you mean about the rewards or satifaction of doing your own work, i have rebuilt engines and other projects.
thanks again
garciarob
 
  #5  
Old 06-12-02, 09:03 PM
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To answer your original question:

Compressor: A piston type is the best. If you get a compressor that is 25 to 50% more capacity than your largest demand tool you will minimize compressor run time with less moisture condensation in the pressure tank and hoses.
Spray gun: I use a Devilbiss JGA syphon feed gun which is a fairly good quality gun but I have used a friend's Taiwan knock-off that works just as well. There is a HVLP type gun available which has way less overspray than a syphon gun but they are kinda pricey and use a whole lot of air. A little too much for me.
Paint type: The most popular finish is base/clear coat. The only problem I have with that type is it is a very thin finish and is quite unforgiving of any imperfections in the prep work. 1200 grit and finer sanding is required. I have very good luck with acrylic enamel. It's quite forgiving and has a good shine.
Respirator: This is one area that it does not pay to skimp. Most labor codes require body shops to use air-supplied respirators. These are like scuba type masks that use filters to remove the oil mist from the compressor air. The paint I recommended is a hazard to use without a proper respirator. The hardener for this paint is an isocyanate and is a known carcinogen. That is one reason I have someone else spray for me.
Place to paint: This could be one of the toughest things to come up with. You need perfect lighting, lots of filtered airflow to pull off overspray and no bugs. While I was throwing back a bubbly and watching the paint set-up on my last DIY paint job, the largest and strongest moth I have ever seen, came from nowhere and did a death dance on my still wet paint. Another reason why I think it pays to pay a professional.
 
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