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Screws fell out of drywall - help please


devoidx's Avatar
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01-28-03, 05:11 PM   #1  
devoidx
Screws fell out of drywall - help please

Hi there

My mission was to put up some shelving in my spare room but it turned out to be a disaster!

The wall is made of drywall, with what seems to be concrete behind it about an inch or so.

I screwed in all of my screws using anchors as I've been told (I'm not much of a handy person). When I went to put up the shelves on the brackets, two brackets came tumbling down!!! The anchors just seemed to slip out of the holes as if nothing was holding them at all. One bracket out of three held in place nicely, and is still there now.....I dont' understand what happened.

Is there some trick to ensuring that the screws stay anchored in the drywall?

Thanks a lot
Andy

 
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01-28-03, 06:08 PM   #2  
Andy,

I am assuming that the drywall must be attached to the concrete wall with 1x furring strips. Since your books may be too heavy for any anchor that I suggest, like a Self Drilling Wallboard Anchor or a Toggle bolt anchor (Home Depot sells these), it might be better if you can find the furring strips and use this as a solid anchor to support your books.

I would think that these are 16" O.C. but you never know.

Try and find these and I know that you will not have any more problems!

Hope this helps!

 
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01-28-03, 07:25 PM   #3  
devoidx
furring?

Hi Doug and thanks for your reply.

I hate to sound as naive as this, especially on a board called doityourself, but what exactly are furring strips? : )

Thanks again!

 
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01-28-03, 07:58 PM   #4  
devoidx,

Furring strips can be anything that helps in attaching a material to a difficult or questionable substrate. In your case, when you mentioned that the concrete is about an inch back behind it, I assumed that you have furring strips. The wood strips may be 1x2 or 1x4 attached to the block by usually mechanical anchors or construction adhesive. Drywall should not be attached directly to a concrete surface so furring strips would be used. They are used for the preparation of a wall, ceiling, or floor with strips of wood or metal to provide a level substrate for plaster, flooring, or another surface or to create an air space.

Furring strips can be any size but depending on the application can be as small as 1/4"!

Hope this helps! Did you find any?

 
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02-03-03, 10:18 AM   #5  
no tricks,
from what you are describing: "anchors seems to slip out of the hole" to me, it sounds like the screws were not given enough turns for the 'wings' to fully open/expand.

examine the anchors when they 'slipped out of the wall.'
Were they expanded as far as possible?

Also consider buying anchors with the widest open wing possible to help spread out the load over the widest drywall area possible.

hope this helps.

 
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02-04-03, 06:31 PM   #6  
brickeyee
If you hunt around at a real hardware/tool store they can order a setting tool for hollow wall anchors. It costs around $30 and is a hand operated little thing that pulls on the screw to expand the wings with no screwing around (pun intended). I purchased one about 10 years ago and it has been worth every penny. I can set an anchor in cinderblock with no problem since it does not use those stupid little teeth to hold against tightening he screw and expanding the anchor.

 
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02-04-03, 07:01 PM   #7  
Andy,

Just out of curoiusity, why are we talking about togglebolts with wing nuts and the like? Find the furring strips that are attached to the block and use these as you anchoring substrate. All the worrys would be gone and its just a matter of finding them, get a stud finder. If you can't see the drywall joints or any nail pops/indentations. Your shelving will hold forever since books are heavy and I wouldn't trust the toggle bolts in this situation..

Problem with toggle bolts is that you may not have enough room for them and the weight may be too heavy with books.

Let us know what you're doing!

 
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02-05-03, 12:20 PM   #8  
What if the drywall was glued to the foundation? Then there wouldn't be any furring.

 
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02-05-03, 12:46 PM   #9  
coops28,

True, but if this block wall is exterior, this would be subject to damage over time. To my knowledge, this is not an approved application by Code nor approved by the Gypsum manufacturers.

Dywall is not approved for this type of application over a block/concrete wall of a basement. This pertaining to drywall attached adhesively to the perimeter foundation wall. Issues of moisture, lack of ventilation would be excellent for mold and
mildew issues. Adhesive application to an interior block wall may be permissable but again not recommended.

Unless using a product like Denshield or a cement backer board, adhesive applications are not approved. Foil faced backed drywall also will not adhere well do to the backing. Furring strips are recommended by Gypsum manufacturers for application to a cement base substrate.

Hope this helps!

 
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