Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Drywall over plaster walls?


Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-08-03, 07:30 PM   #1  
Mango
Drywall over plaster walls?

I started a kitchen painting project and stripped the wall paper off the walls. Underneith I found painted wall paper and cracked and uneven plaster. I am wondering whether will be more of a pain to scrape of the painted wall paper (it's really tough to get off even with remover) and then go through the process of chipping away all the damaged stuff (there's a lot of damaged stuff) or to put drywall over it.

 
Sponsored Links
bungalow jeff's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-08-03, 09:32 PM   #2  
bungalow jeff
You can apply drywall over plaster, however your door and window trim may need some adjustment to fit right. There is so much plumbing and electrical work to do in a kitchen remodel that removing the plaster to open the walls is a convenience.

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-09-03, 07:08 AM   #3  
Mango
How long will it take

How long (about) do you think it would take to remove the old plaster walls and are there dangers with the dust? (I thought I read something about asbestos somewhere on the forum) I have a five year old and a three year old we live in a two bedroom apartment so we can't really just stay out of the area during the remodeling.

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-09-03, 05:25 PM   #4  
Mango
Decided I'm going to take down the plaster

I've decided to take down the plaster. Can you direct me to any web sites that can show me how to deal with windows, cabinets, etc?

 
bungalow jeff's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-09-03, 07:24 PM   #5  
bungalow jeff
Get a good respirator, a fan to blow out the window (not at neighbors) and some plastic sheets to seal up the kitchen from the rest of the house. Plaster is messy and the dust gets everywhere if you are not careful. A pitchfork can make quick work of it, but make sure you know where pipes are and any electrical lines are off. If the floor is to stay, a heavy drop cloth will be needed to protect it.

When putting up the new sheetrock and the old studs are not even you can screw on 2x4's to create a level plane (thanks to this forum for that great idea).

Are you interested in new windows and cabinets? Personal preference and budget (and more budget) will govern there.

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-10-03, 10:03 AM   #6  
Mango
Yeah we took down a 8 x 3 section last night and you are right it does get everywhere. There is some really funky looking insulation behind the lathe which renewed my fears about asbestos but I have a repirator and some plastic sheeting I can put up. One of the windows in there is brand new and the other is really old but it's not in the budget to replace it. The doors are really just doorways, there are no actual doors hanging in them. I'm trying to figure out if I have to detach all the cabinets or if I can do a sort of jig saw puzzle in the exposed space. I know that's not too high quality but like I said this whole thing started out as a painting project

 
bungalow jeff's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-10-03, 08:08 PM   #7  
bungalow jeff
Most projects start out as a painting job. What does the insulation look like? Most post-construction insulation (like blown-in cellulaose) is asbestos free.

You can leave cabinets (and the plaster beneath) in place if you are willing to feather out the joint compound on the new drywall very wide to smooth out the difference in wall thicknesses. The plaster can range from under 3/8" to over 1/2" over the height of a wall along the same door opening. With the lathe under it, it is impossible to match the total plaster wall thickness with drywall. It will always be a little thicker or thinner, so generous feathering of the joint compound smooths out the difference.

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-11-03, 10:48 AM   #8  
Mango
The insulation looks like dark curls. Like a costume beard sort of. It's black in color.

Is there a trick to wearing a respirator and goggles or glasses? Mine fog up immediately. I didn't wear it last night and can feel it today so I'd love to know if there's a secret to it.

Thanks,

 
bungalow jeff's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-11-03, 08:28 PM   #9  
bungalow jeff
That insulation may be rock wool. Not an asbestos concern, but itchy as heck.

The secret to wearing a respirator and goggles is to breathe trough your eyes. No, that's not it. If the respirator is fitting correctly, your exhales should not be fogging up the goggles. Otherwise, just give the goggles time to adjust to the rooms temperature to reduce the fogging some. Hard work makes your body heat fog them up often. Carry a clean rag to wipe the goggles and your face often.

 
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

06-11-03, 09:39 PM   #10  
Hello Mango,

Sounds like you're havin fun. Jeff's got you lined out here pretty well. Thanks for pickin up my slack Jeff, been too busy to change my mind lately!
There's also lots of good basic how info here on the site. From the home page, http://doityourself.com/
scroll down to the site map & click on the topics you're interested in, lots of easy to understand instructions, some even got pictures

Good luck.

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-12-03, 07:08 AM   #11  
Mango
Thanks Jeff and Dell,

Last night I uncovered a brick chimney that I didn't even know was there. It must go through the closet in the apartment upstairs and down to a part of the basement that has been blocked off. I'm going to look around the site to see what I can do to bring out the natural color in the bricks. There's a brass portal looking door but the plaster is on there so tight I can't get it off without damaging the brass. I donít think I really want to open it but it would look nice if I could get it cleaned up.

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-13-03, 09:15 PM   #12  
Mango
I'm thinking about doing recessed lighting in the ceiling. Is there a part of the site on wiring?

 
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

06-14-03, 06:37 AM   #13  
Yep, even got a link to tutorial on installing recessed lighting. Here's a link to the how-do page,
http://doityourself.com/electric/index.htm

Good luck

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-16-03, 08:35 PM   #14  
Mango
This project has gone from bad to worse. We took down cardboard type tiles sagging from the ceiling lathe. Above that is about twenty pounds of rodent poop. Weíre taking down the lathe right now and itís not attached to the ceiling joists itís on a sort of wooden frame and there is another false ceiling above that and then the ceiling joists are above that. I really donít want to spend any more time on this than absolutely necessary because my school starts back up again on Thursday. Is there a way to determine if the wooden frame that the lathe was on is strong enough to support the drywall ceiling?

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-17-03, 10:39 AM   #15  
Mango
Most of the lathe is down now so I can see there are joists. The are 45 in apart though. I'm planning on hanging 1/2 in drywall. Do I have to add 1x4 ferring strips or can I just go with the joists every 45 in?

Thanks

P.S. sorry about the exasperated post last night, I'm just a little frustrated

 
toni1595's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 299
ME

06-17-03, 05:50 PM   #16  
Hello, sounds like your in deeper than you wanted to be. What you've described is typical for an old house. THey simply set the joists close enough to attach the ends of the 4' laths to.
What I'd suggest is to put a couple more appropriately sized joists in between the existing ones and continue with your project.
You don't say in your post what the approximate age of this house is but I'd be willing to guess it is a post and beam type of construction, and probably quite solid.
If your time is limited your only recourse now would be to hire the work out or wait until you can do it yourself. Good Luck.

 
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

06-17-03, 06:27 PM   #17  
Mango,

Sounds like you're having the same kind of week I'm having, not so good to say the least. My recommendation would be to run some furring perpendicular to the joists, as the 45" centers won't properly support the 1/2" rock. Cheapest & easiest solution would be to run some 1"x3" or 1"x4" at 16" centers across the joists & then hang your drywall. You're learning the first lesson of DIY home improvement, nothing is ever as easy as you first think it will be. Cheer up, have a cold one, & regroup for tomorrow. You'll get thru this.

 
bungalow jeff's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-17-03, 08:17 PM   #18  
bungalow jeff
Awesome has the goods for you. I always try to remain optimistic, in these instances. What electrical or plumbing upgrades are easier with all of this ceiling out of the way? You can add sound insulation.

It's hard to stay positive, the first room I worked on in my 100-year old house was the dining room. I pulled the crown molding down to strip paint and the plaster and drywall ceilings came down in a wet slop with leaves, nuts, and sorts of squirrel nest crud. Trim paint stripping job upgraded to a siding repair and roof leak repair. Oh, and a new ceiling.

 
Mango's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-18-03, 07:50 AM   #19  
Mango
Thanks guys

I'm going to run the 1 x 4's today. The house was built in 1860. Amazing to me. Do you have any suggestions about getting rid of the rodent unine smell? I'm worried that the recessed lights will heat it up and make it worse. I can't replace all the insulation right now.



Here goes!

 
bungalow jeff's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

06-18-03, 08:46 PM   #20  
bungalow jeff
When I cleaned up the squirrel nests, we sprayed diluted ammonia on the framing. I also recommend Nature's Miracle. It was created to remove pet odors.

 
Search this Thread