Cutting holes in sheetrock.

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  #1  
Old 10-13-03, 06:36 AM
PlainBill
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Cutting holes in sheetrock.

I'm working on a fairly extensive kitchen remodel. Because of the changes, it will be easier to strip the existing drywall, add/relocate outlets, plumbing lines, etc, then install new sheetrock.

The last time I did something like this, I made the cutouts for the outlets by measuring, cutting the holes in thesheetrock, then putting it in place. Of course, most holes had to be trimmed because they were too high, low, or off to one side. This made for a lot of patching. What is the best way to mark the locations so I can do a better job?

PlainBill
 
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Old 10-13-03, 09:11 AM
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The best way to cut out outlets etc... Is with a rotozip. I measure off the floor, or counter top, to the bottom edge of the box. Then hang your sheet and screw off the perimeter. Then transfer your measurement to the rock and cut out. If you don't want to buy one, then measure from the floor up and from the wall over ( Like you have been doing). But, unfortunately, this will rarely work because nothing is plum, square or level so you miss frequently. Then you have to repair in the finishing process.
 
  #3  
Old 10-15-03, 05:32 AM
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Spend the $$ for a spiral saw. Rotozip is a brand name, yes the best on the market, but there are others which will perform well on small jobs. The cheaper ones won't hold up to daily use on drywall, but you can pick one up for like $40-$50 at the yard in a box stores.

These tools have lots of attachments made for them & can be used for a variety of jobs. I've got the deluxe rotozip brand tool myself, used for drywall, trimming laminate counters, etching glass, even has a carbide cutting/grinding wheel attachment, which I've used alot! Definitely worth the price charged.
 
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Old 10-15-03, 06:38 AM
PlainBill
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Thanks, guys. I was a little baffled how a rotozip would help (wouldn't it either run off in random directions, cut a hole in the side of a plastic box, or wear down the bit on a metal box?). Then I saw the guide point series of bits and it all became clear.

PlainBill
 
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Old 10-16-03, 07:15 PM
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There ya go, clear as mud.
 
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