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crumbling stuff around windows and exterior wall

crumbling stuff around windows and exterior wall

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  #1  
Old 12-18-03, 07:15 AM
fixitmom
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crumbling stuff around windows and exterior wall

The walls in my house are finished with some kind of plaster...with a fake looking, very busy texture. Nothing pointy, but lots of crevices. The plaster around some of my windows and one exterior wall had crumbled away from the edges, and one whole wall in between two windows had come loose from the cement looking backer board. I want to repair all that, and then skim coat the other walls to have a smoother finish. Does not have to be smooth, just less busy. I kind of like the look of old, slightly imperfect plaster. Anyway, what should I use, how should I prep, etc? The house was built in the mid 70's, no lath, just that cement looking stuff underneath. We had a new roof put on, and moisture barrier to stop the ice damming, so I believe the moisture problem has been addressed. Do I have to sand the sound, painted walls, or can I just prime and skim coat? I'm really clueless here, but ready to jump in.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-18-03, 10:27 AM
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Where do you live? Do you know for sure it's plaster? Many houses built in the 70's are drywall. I don't know what the "cement looking" stuff under it is. Reguarding the texture; the easiest material to work with is drywall mud. Use lightweight. You aren't going to get these walls straight or smooth if you are a beginner. Takes some practice. Basically you skim the mud on the wall with a twelve inch drywall knife. You will probably have to put 2 thin coats on to cover the old texture. Then you will have to put another texture over that or if you like the look you have go with it.

Do you have trim around your windows? what is the depth differece between the surface and the "cement" stuff in between the windows?
 
  #3  
Old 12-18-03, 05:47 PM
fixitmom
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Well, the plaster isn't very thick, about 1/8th inch, maybe? The solid surface underneath it looks like it comes in a sheet, like drywall does, but it has a rough cement like finish, it's gray etc. I saw something like it at Home Depot, I think it goes under ceramic tile floors, but not sure. Anyway, do you think I can scrape off all the loose plaster, and skim coat lightweight drywall mud over everything to even it all up? I have no problem with ending up with some texture, faint trowel marks are fine. The house was stucco on the outside, and the stuff inside is similar, but not sharp and pointy. The pattern of the texture is so regular, it looks as if it may have been rolled into the stuff. Will the drywall mud adhere to the painted walls as well, or should I prime first, and with what? Sorry, folks, but I want to do something with this room during Christmas vacation and I procrastinated getting info! 8]
 
  #4  
Old 12-18-03, 05:52 PM
fixitmom
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Oops, I live in Northwestern Michigan, I don't know for sure it's actually plaster, but it isn't drywall or anything that goes up like drywall.
 
  #5  
Old 12-19-03, 08:04 AM
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If the paint sheen is flat then you can go right over it. If its egg shell or shinyer then sand it or ruff it up. That will make the mud stick a little better. Definitely fill in the damaged areas. When the're filled in flush with the wall then put tape over it to prevent cracking.
 
  #6  
Old 12-19-03, 06:28 PM
fixitmom
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I had someone look at the mess, and they said it was drywall, that crumbled apart. The stuff I thought was plaster was the middle stuff between the paper and the cement looking backing stuff. I couldn't see any seams because of the texturing. So, I can scrape and chip the large area of damage, fill with mud, tape and skim coat over the tape, then sand and skim coat the whole room, prime and paint?
 
  #7  
Old 12-19-03, 08:24 PM
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I am quite confused. There is drywall that has gone bad and it should be about a half inch thick. But what is behind it? Cement backer board? Why?
Or is there a drywall finish material applied over cement backer board? Why?
If there is indeed cement backer board why did the finish deteriorate in the first place? Has the cause been addressed?
If it is conventional drywall and it crumbled it sounds like a moisture problem perhaps a leak or condensation. Has anything been done to correct these problems, if indeed they are problems?
 
  #8  
Old 12-20-03, 06:36 AM
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Tightcoat has a good point, why did it get damaged? If you have a large area of damaged drywall you should cut out and replace. If its small then you can fill in and tape over. Then skim over the bad texture, probably 2 coats to get what you want. Then sand and prime. then after primer coat you will get a pretty good Idea at what the final product will look like. Now is the time to fix anything. Good luck
 
  #9  
Old 01-05-04, 06:28 PM
fixitmom
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Hi! We've been mudding for a week, seems like. First, I think the damage came from moisture, due to ice damming, and condensation around the windows. We had a new roof put on, extra insulation and venting added, and a water barrier membrane added. It wasn't drywall after all. I think it was plaster as I first thought. We took the GRINDER to the highest peaks of the texture, and we sanded the walls, and have three coats of joint compound on (tell me this is the same as mud!) We didn't use tape, so I hope that portion doesn't give me any grief. So far, I think we did a pretty good job, but I NEVER want to touch a drywall trowel thingie or a piece of sander paper again in my life! I really wish I knew what to do about the condensation on the windows. We have electric baseboard heat, and for some reason the heating units were installed directly under the windows. Could this be why we have such a lot of condensation? Would rerouting the heat source help this problem? Thanks for all the help, folks.
By the way, WHY does paint sag?! I have a few sags, even in areas that I KNOW are not to heavy. (That doesn't sound right, does it? lol.)
 
  #10  
Old 01-06-04, 01:53 PM
mudder
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dont be too concerned right now about the condensation with all the mud and paint drying and therefore putting an enormous amount of moisture in the air and the colder temperatures we're getting freezing up your windows condensation is normal. If you get a lot of condensation a week or so after everythings done I would check for insulation between the windoe and framing behind trim and caulking outside, and the window pane's weatherstriping.
Its the usual place for heaters to be as the window surface cools the air and may even leak cold into house. Though it indeed helps create condensation with warm air meeting colder glass surface.
But if the windows are older or vinyl sliders you may think about changing one or two a year. Joint compound is mud. If the paint saggs it is because it was to heavy or roller was pressed down too hard, perhaps the sag was there befor and now its more visible with fresh paint.
 
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