Skim coat with joint compound?

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  #1  
Old 02-22-04, 09:39 AM
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Skim coat with joint compound?

Can I use joint compound to skim coat an entire room that has patched and primed drywall? I'm talking about a very thin coat. Just enough to fill in the imperfections and hide the orange peel from the old paint. I don't mean texture paint. Just layers of old latex.

Does USG (or anyone) make a product more suitable for this? Will joint compound work?

Thanks.

Adam
Collegeville, Pa.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-22-04, 11:33 AM
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Yes, you can do this, and yes joint compound will work. As for specific types or brands that would work best, I can't help you there.
 
  #3  
Old 02-22-04, 01:55 PM
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Use either Lite mud or topping mix would actually be better.
 
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Old 02-22-04, 02:45 PM
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My product of choice is USG Plus 3. Available at all your local home stores.
 
  #5  
Old 02-23-04, 01:00 AM
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If this is what you are goin gto do, yes it will work. But I would go with a whitecoat plaster. You'd get a more durable wall i the end. And all drywall mud is going to work the same, it's not going to matter what type.
 
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Old 02-23-04, 06:46 AM
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Takes a seasoned plaster professional to get plaster right. And your wrong, different types of mud go on different. All purpose is heavy and is harder to apply than light weight(for example)
 
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Old 02-23-04, 03:13 PM
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Coop you go to any plaster company and try to use drywall mud to fix a PLASTER patch and they will be handing you your walking papers. I'll say it again, and it applies to materials too. THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR THE RIGHT JOB. And if you know outfits doing this. They are hacks.
 
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Old 02-23-04, 08:49 PM
lancer1991
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I've tried skim coating some walls in my home and I keep running across the same problem. That problem is wherever I have an overlap of mud and I sand it and paint, I always have this visible ridge (I can see it while sanding, but it will never sand smooth). I try not to roll on too much mud that it starts to dry on the surface before I skim it, so I usally only run 2 roller (9") lines down the wall then skim and then roll the next width. Am I not doing something right?
 
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Old 02-23-04, 09:07 PM
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lancer, are you using a roller to apply mud? Maybe I didn't read that right, pls clarify, rollers got no place in skimming a surface, certain textures yes, but not for skimming. Please post back in more detail.

boardslinger - whoa up partner, don't know where you're comin off with that hack talk, but coops isn't even in that realm. We can agree to disagree here, but please don't speak out of turn. I maybe totally off base here, but one quick question, when you started out "slammin board" were you dbl nailin every fastener? Didn't think so.
 
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Old 02-23-04, 09:26 PM
lancer1991
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awesomedell,

Yes I'm applying the mud to the wall with a roller and then pulling it off.
 
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Old 02-23-04, 09:33 PM
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Lancer,

You're going about this with the wrong tool. Get yourself a good 12" drywall knife or else a trowel and try again, you'll be forever with the method you're using.
 
  #12  
Old 02-23-04, 09:43 PM
lancer1991
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Won't I still run into the same issue of having areas of overlapping by using hawk and knife method? I thought the whole idea behind rolling the mud on was to get larger amounts on for speed and ease.

Is there a certain consistancy I should look for when mixing the mud? I've added water and mixed (pre mix USG tried both green and blue) but never got it to where it was soupy, just thinner than factory.
 
  #13  
Old 02-23-04, 10:43 PM
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Not if you're using the tools correctly. Good mud work, whatever the medium maybe, compound, plaster, cement, etc, is all a matter of coats & patience. Technique is just like icing a cake in my grandma's bakery.

Ditch the roller, it's the wrong tool for the task.
 
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Old 02-24-04, 06:05 AM
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Hey boardslinger, You are right. If I was working for a plaster company and I showed up with drywall mud I would be bounced. Thats why I own and operate a drywall company. If I had an employee skimming bad drywall walls with plaster I would toss them. You are right, right tools for the right job. Go back and read the original question.
 
  #15  
Old 02-24-04, 08:28 AM
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All right, I'm gonna play the devils advocate here.

When I skim coat a wall, which isn't often, but necessary for some delicate wallpapers, I sometimes use this method.

This works great for light knock-down and orange-peel textures.

Scoop about 2 gallons of mud into a 5, thin with water and drill/mixer to a thick pancake batter consistency.

I roll it on about a 3' x 3' area, and skim it off with a window squeegee. Dries fast with a glass-like finish.

No, really, it does.
 
  #16  
Old 02-24-04, 11:43 AM
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Hey Prowall guy I've heard this before from a guy who does remodels for a living too. Haven't tried but I may need to soon.

Does it matter what type of roller you use? Would a knife work instead of squeege?
 
  #17  
Old 02-24-04, 12:45 PM
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I use a 3/4" roller. I doubt a knife would do the same as the squeegee. It is a 24" window squeegee. I was taught this awhile back, and never deviated from the directions.
 
  #18  
Old 02-24-04, 02:37 PM
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Coops I didn't mean to make it sound as if I was calling "YOU" a hack. If that is how you or anyone else took it that way I apologize. Wasn't my attention.
Awesome, I started banging houses with my Dad and Uncle at the age of 10. No screws. Banging. Like I said I learned from the old timers. I personally think that anyone learning anytrade needs to learn from the old timers for they have skills and ticks of the trade that are not seen anymore, and will outlast any method of today. As a matter of fact when I do get sent to a residental hang, I often convince my boss to let me bang it. And am still done in less than a week. with only 2 guys.
 
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Old 02-24-04, 08:40 PM
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Boardslinger,
I think we got off on the wrong foot, so let's start over. Welcome Aboard!


Most of the big builders, absolutely insist on glue & screw in this area. I might go thru a box of nails every half dozen units when we're doing new residential stuff.
 
  #20  
Old 02-25-04, 02:32 PM
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Not a problem Awesome, Glad to be here.
 
  #21  
Old 02-25-04, 09:30 PM
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Have to say Prowall, I've never seen it done that way, but I may have to give it a try, never too old to learn a new trick, the 2' squeegy is an interesting idea, wider is always better. Don't have one in the van, but a guy can never have too many tools!

When skimming an entire wall, I've always used either a 12" or 14" drywall knife, I like a pan, but got a hawk as well.
 
  #22  
Old 07-25-04, 08:31 PM
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Red face

Hi guys;
Prowall, I was trying your method utilizing the window squeege. I must be doing something wrong, because all I get is a lot of mud off the wall, a large mess and nothing on the wall! LOL!! I was using a regular 12" window squeege and applied the mud with a 8 inch knife. I know practice is the by-word but suggestions...BTW what is the size of the rubber on the squeege that you use?
It isn't one like used for decaling is it?
 
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