Covering Fake Brick

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  #1  
Old 02-28-04, 09:30 AM
TeaSea
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Covering Fake Brick

Greetings,

I have a kitchen covered in this weird fake brick facade. Do you think I could just apply a coat of plaster over top of it? I don't mind losing the inch or two of wall--it would be infinitely better than ripping it all down.

If so, what would I use? Joint compound? Somthing else?

Thanks in advance for your help.
 
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Old 02-28-04, 08:12 PM
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You could cover with some drywall. Or if you want you could cover with joint compound. The thing is every fake grout line will crack. If I were going to do this I would fill in till flat. Get some 36" mesh and cover the entire surface then skim smooth. But then again if it were me I would rip it all out to begin with. Even if it ment removing the drywall.
 
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Old 02-28-04, 08:38 PM
boardslinger
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Go to H. D. and pick up some 1/4" drywall. Then tape and texture, the extra $$ will be worth the lessened stress and work load to do something a couple of times just to get it to look just o.k.
The problem with using joint compound is it shrinks, and with this much mud on the wall you are going to be sanding, recoating, sanding, recoating, etc, etc, etc. Do it right, do it once. Good Luck, if you need any ideas or help give me a yell.
 
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Old 02-29-04, 06:08 AM
TeaSea
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Dry wall?

Thanks very much for your quick responses. I'd considered ripping it all down, but I'm a stay-at-home mommy with an inquisitive toddler, and I have a feeling the two jobs aren't compatible.

How about if I pretended I was going for a venetian (not sure if this is the right word) textured wall, and went for deliberate imperfection? Could I make things like cracks work for me, or would it end up on the floor after a while?

Coops, when you say that the fake grout lines will crack, it sounds like you've seen this stuff before. It looks as though each individual "brick" was actually adhered to the wall, and then this goopy black "grout" was smeared (VERY messily) between them. Is that what you're talking about?

If you guys think I should simply go over it with dry wall, how do I attach the dry wall? Do I just drill through the "bricks"?
 
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Old 02-29-04, 08:04 AM
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It looks as though each individual "brick" was actually adhered to the wall, and then this goopy black "grout" was smeared (VERY messily) between them.
I think your goop is mastic. Are these real bricks or fake?
 
  #6  
Old 02-29-04, 11:12 AM
TeaSea
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A Shot

I'm not sure what mastic looks like. I'm trying to attach a shot of it.



The brick isn't real, but I'm not sure what it's made of. Clay? Some kind of tile? It's too think and fine to be real brick.

Thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 02-29-04, 04:50 PM
boardslinger
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Just laminate over it. Apply some joint compound to the back side of a 1/4" sheet of drywall and stick it on the brick. Use a board or a scrap piece to really bang it on their so it sucks up nice and tight.
 
  #8  
Old 03-01-04, 06:53 AM
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I think your best bet for a quick relatively cheap fix would be to laminate drywall over the brick facade, however I'd use drywall adhesive, instead of the joint compound. Once that glue sets up the sheet will be there forever. You can buy the drywall glue at a lumber yard or a big box store. Apply it liberally over the brick & then put your sheet up. However to do this you're going to have to run some screws to really suck the board down tight.

So your first step is get some drywall screws & a drill with a #2 phillips bit to drive the screws with, screwgun would be the be better if you have access to one, but the drill will work. Anyway check to make sure that the screws will drive into the brick material & hold. As long as the bricks are securely attached to the wall & the screws will drive & hold until the glue sets, the sheet will stay there permanent.

If you can't screw into the brick, you can still laminate over it, but you'll have to put some plywood scraps or something similiar over it and use boards to wedge against it to hold the sheets firmly to the wall until the glue sets up, (6-8hrs to be sure)

Also it'd be a good idea to lay some kind of a long straight edge over the brick & to make sure there's not a couple of obvious high spots that'll make the drywall bulge outward. If so you'll need to flatten them out somehow, chisel, file, whatever works.

I do think laminating over would be alot better than trying to simply cover it with joint compound. The grout line areas will require too much of a build up & it'll definitely crack sooner than later & probably at that point you'll have little chunks of dried compound falling out on your floor.

In a perfect world though, I'd rip the junk out to the studs, & rehang & finish a new wall there. Guess that's a bit more than $.02 worth, but still worth the price charged. Good Luck!
 
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Old 07-08-04, 06:46 AM
mccabedoug
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I just did this hellish job a couple months ago. The previous homeowners used thin brick pieces to make a bar in my family room look like it was bricked. THEN they painted it white!! After a few years we were sick of it.

Here's what I did. I bought 1/2" drywall and 2" drywall screws. I then went around and located the studs which the existing drywall & bricks were attached. I marked those on the floor, sides & ceiling. I then cut my new drywall pieces to size, covered the back with adhesive and screwed the new drywall to the bricks such that the screws went between the bricks and into the studs. If the screw missed a stud, the new drywall WILL NOT attach. Think drywall to drywall with a 1/2" thick brick between them. The screw just spins.

I had to go to these lengths since most of the drywall did not rest on the floor and, hence, it could slide down.

This was a tough little project with lots & lots of cuts and corners.

Good luck!!
 
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