Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Refinishing ceiling after Acoustic removal


cali_grrl's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-28-04, 10:54 AM   #1  
cali_grrl
Refinishing ceiling after Acoustic removal

Hello all!

We just had the asbestos acoustic ceiling removed from our condo and there are some places that have, what I think is, bare drywall showing (kinda looks like cardboard? In hallway, master closet) and in the other rooms it looks like there is plaster (white rough sandy type finish).

The rooms with the "plaster" ceiling don't look THAT bad, but there are raised portions here and there and it's not the best looking finish.

Should I call a drywaller, or a plasterer to do this job? Can we do this ourselves? I initially wanted a smooth surface but after reading many of the posts here, that doesn't sound like something we could do on our own.

Caveat is we have radiant heating in the ceiling, so I'm not sure what limitations that puts on us in terms of refinishing.

Any advice/suggestions/feedback would be MUCH appreciated! (We are cash strapped after this purchase, so anything we can do ourselves would be wonderful!)

Thanks in advance!

Cali

 
Sponsored Links
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

04-29-04, 06:20 AM   #2  
Hi Cali and welcome to the diy.com forums.

You're going to need to skim out those ceilings with joint compound to bring them back to a proper paintable finish. You could do it yourself to save some $$, but if you have ) experience with drywall finishing, it might really be worth your while to hire this done. Pricing varies by area, but here in rural Mo. it would run you $.40 s/f, in the cities, KC & StL, is what I'm familiar with, it'll run you about $.50 s/f.

Other option would be to go with a textured finish that is applied with joint compound. You can do this by thinning the mud down do like a thick paint & then applying it with a 3/4" nap paint roller, then knocking it down after it set like 20-30 mins with a drywall blade to knock the high spots down a bit.

But before you do that the surface needs to be pretty smooth, so a skim coat of joint compound will be required I'm sure. Hope that helps.

 
cali_grrl's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-29-04, 08:38 AM   #3  
cali_grrl
Thank you, AD :)

Del:

My boyfriend and I are more than happy to try to take on the task of doing it ourselves. But after reading all the posts here, I didn't know if we would be biting off more than we could chew.

Skimming: Is this using regularly mixed joint compound, or the think paint/pancake consistancy?

I would at least like to try in one of the less conspicuous places (pantry/closet) to see if I can do it, and if I fail miserably, I will call in the calvary.

Is there any links you can recommend that explain exactly how to go about the process and some product recommendations? I will take some pics of the areas today, so you may see the two surfaces I am dealing with.

Thanks again for your help...it is much appreciated!

Charlotte

 
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

04-30-04, 02:58 PM   #4  
For the skim coat the mud should be thicker than what you would use for texture. Something close to the consistency of soft-serve ice cream.


It would be a good idea to take a look at this link. http://doityourself.com/wall/jointcompound.htm

 
cali_grrl's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

05-01-04, 10:27 AM   #5  
cali_grrl
Armed and ready...

Okay, so I hung out in Home Depot for a few hours yesterday picking the brains of the contractors in the drywall department who seemed to sense my questions.

As a result I have a 5 Gallon bucket of joint compound, 2nd 5 gallon bucket, trowel 14x6 , mud box, drywall sander with extension pole attachment (with medium and fine grits) and a little more confidence that I can do this.

I think I'm not going to attempt to do the smooth texture, because it seems to take expertise and money (to hird) that I do not have. Instead I'm going to go with you first recommendation and thin the compound, and roll it up with a 3/4 nap roller, then "knock it down".

I will wait to attempt this tomorrow, as I'm still finishing up painting the kitchen, so if anyone has any last minute tips/guidance/suggestions, I'd REALLY appreciate them!

Thanks again!

Charlotte

 
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

05-01-04, 08:00 PM   #6  
I think you guys will do fine. Skim over any places that are noticeably bad, like gouges, nicks & so on from scraping the old texture off. If there are are any cracks at seams or anything I'd apply mesh tape over them before skimming.

Also a good idea to practice your texture technique on a piece of scrap drywall or even a piece of cardboard to try an get a pattern you're satisified with. Remeber worse comes to worse & you don't like it just scrape it off before it has time to dry & start over. Be sure to adequately cover the floors to avoid having to scrape them when you're done! Don't worry it ain't brain surgery!

 
Search this Thread