Taping onto wood: mud and tape question

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  #1  
Old 07-16-04, 08:25 AM
kdkrone
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Taping onto wood: mud and tape question

About 12 years ago, we did a remodel and added dual pane wood sash windows throughout the house. In one room, where we have French doors and with two side windows 24" each for a total span of about 10 feet, the door/window "insert" was trimmed with quarter-round, which abutted to drywall and mud was smeared across the the joint onto the wood apparently without tape. Years later, the seams have cracked and some of the plaster has come off of the wood quarter-round, but most (which was a thin coat) has adhered. (I can therefore see that no tape was placed across the drywall/quarter-round joint)

I have hired someone to come in and repair the long stretch. The question that I have is about whether to 1, use fiberglass or paper tape, and 2, whether the tape should be glued onto the wood or does glue make a less adherent surface for mud than the porousity of the wood (and three, if glue should be used, what kind?)

The thickness of the repair is not very relevant, as we live in an old adobe brick house and the mud was deliberately applied in a thick, undulating coat, so that the thickness of fiberglass tape would not be an issue.

Thanks for your input,
Ken K
 
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  #2  
Old 07-19-04, 05:27 AM
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You shouldn't tape that. You should caulk it. I would trim it out with 3 1/4" casing anyway. Why did you use 1/4 round. Maybe I'm confused?
 
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Old 07-19-04, 07:27 AM
kdkrone
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"Why did you use 1/4 round. Maybe I'm confused?"

In order to keep the character of the house, the windows were recessed, similar to the others that were in place. They do not have a frame around them, as does more contemporary construction. The drywall finishes at the window frame, sitting 1/2" in front of it, and the 1/4 round wraps onto the window frame to provide the smooth transition between the two elements. So the issue is how to deal with the seam between the drywall and the quarter-round. The initial solution 12 years ago was to wrap thick drywall mud, which was used to give a smooth, undulating surface for the walls, similar to what one might have found in an old Italian home, where plaster was smoothed over underlying stones, so it was not a flat surface. This tick drywall was then tapered in thickness until it blended into the 1/4 round at the windows.

KK
 
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Old 07-20-04, 06:06 AM
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Do you have a wood jam for the doors and windows?
 
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Old 07-20-04, 06:35 AM
kdkrone
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Yes, the jambs are wood for the doors and windows involved in the repair. With the quarter round,they have the appearance of being smoothly recessed into the wall. The whole thing probably could have been dealt with had the contractor used plastic quarter round bead and taped onto that, but I don't know if that was available 15 years ago. Regardless, he did not and we need to deal with what we have.

Ken K
 
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