priming new compound


  #1  
Old 08-02-04, 12:27 PM
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Smile priming new compound

Hi guys;
Need a little input here. Don't know if this should be posted at painting or here but here it is.
I recently skim coated a 15 x 20 room, ceiling and all. Rather back breaking and neck kinking job. Really empathize with you who do this for a living ! LOL!!
Here is the question, We (?) have picked out Behrs latex semi-gloss paint for me (!) to paint the room with. I know that the compound has to be painted with a PVA type, or oilbased, primer, but I have a few gallons of Sears outdoor oil based primer available. ( House is wood frame but I recently sided and no longer have to paint wood every year.) Is this primer okay to use? I know the smell factor will be there, but I will tolerate it and it will ( hopefully) be eliminated with the top coat.
Anyone have experience with topcoating Sears brand oilbased primer with Behrs latex top paint? Don't want to go through all this to have the primer reject the topcoat!
If incompatible, my next choice is Zeissler 1-2-3
Any input appreciated.
 
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Old 08-04-04, 02:51 PM
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I've used exterior oil primer indoors, you're right about the smell factor, but other than that once it's fully dried I don't think you'll have any difficulty getting the latex to take on top of it. The Zinsser 1-2-3 is also a very good product as well.

I would discourage you from choosing a semi-gloss or gloss paint for anything other than trim work, it'll highlight every imperfection in the finish job & the results may be less than desireable. Just my $.02 worth on that.

Good luck with the painting!
 
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Old 08-07-04, 11:30 AM
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Awesomedell;
Thanks for the reply. In my post I confused the topcoat paint. Actually, it is a light tan latex with the semi-gloss for the trim. One other question though. After using the oil base primer ( Compound REALLY sucked it up!!!) I painted the WHOLE wall with the Zeissler. However, in one section you can see the outlines of the section that I had to repatch. This is a column from wall to ceiling in the middle of the wall. Either side, of this column, the wall is slightly crinckled ( do to improper painting by a long ago owner and didn't see it to I had primed the wall) This now shows up with the primer and the patch. I had originally compounded out, and feathered, this down to almost 5 inches from the crack and was reallllly smooth! The other walls appear to be fine. Any good suggestions to alleviate this?
As I said I have already primed the wall, will I have to further skim , or sand?(eccccccchh!), the rest of the wall? Will a compound skim take over the Zeissler?
Thanks for your help in this and other questions in the past!
 
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Old 08-07-04, 01:31 PM
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practically no patch will be invisible feathering out 5". I would go out at least 1 foot more on each side,maybe more with a 12" knife. Don't go over what you have with spackle unless it wasn't really that smoothe[flat]to begin with. Lay a straight edge across the patch. There should not be any daylight to speak of and the straightedge should not pivot on the repair. The final repair should be more like 3' wide. It is important to go out far enough so that the bump you create is so wide as to be unnoticible. While still being there. Thin the joint compound with some water, keep the crap out of it, and stir it good. Make it creamy make it nice.Prime and paint
 

Last edited by joneq; 08-07-04 at 02:37 PM.
 

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