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skim coating over bad sheet rock work and old textured walls

skim coating over bad sheet rock work and old textured walls


  #1  
Old 02-24-05, 02:49 PM
patriots
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skim coating over bad sheet rock work and old textured walls

I just bought a new home and some of the walls and ceiling were replaced with new sheetrock. The person who joined the new sheetrock to the old had no clue what they were doing. I now would like to cover the ceiling and walls of the entire house by skim coating until all walls are perfectly smooth. Some of the worst walls are almost an inch behind the old walls leaving way to much space for me to skim coat the walls even. The old walls have a semi rough texture. What I need to know is how I can try to cover up all of the horrible work by skim coating, if possible. Where should I start ceiling or walls and the best technique to skim coat (where should I start skimming from)Also what tools/compound I need. I know this is a tough one but I have faith in u!!
 
  #2  
Old 02-25-05, 05:12 AM
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Hello and welcome to the forums.

I gotta get on the road to work right now, but I'll get back to you this evening. Meantime if you can post some pics it might help. Sounds like you might need more than some skim to fix this and make it look acceptable.
 
  #3  
Old 02-25-05, 08:34 AM
J
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I know awsome will be back later to straighten you out but I think in the meantime you should work on getting the pics. Is it possible that the previous owners went right over part of the existing walls without removing them first? It is pretty impossible to have them mismatch so much. How thick is the drywall that is 1" proud of the rest of the wall? Is it 1 layer , 2 layers, 3 layers. Is it at all possible to contact the previous owners and ask them what the freak they did? are you capable of hanging sheetrock on at least the walls. What is wrong with the ceilings? Same as the walls? Were any walls knocked down to make the rooms bigger? Have you ever done any of this kind of work? What is your skill level?Is this in every room? If not how much are we talking about here?Any plaster walls? Is hiring someone out of the question?

You will get the best advice in the shortest time by giving the most info. A picture is worth 1,000 words. I don't know if he will need the answers to all those ?'s but it can't hurt. I do think he will need more than you gave though.
 
  #4  
Old 02-25-05, 06:56 PM
patriots
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A wall was removed on inbetween the kitchen and the living room. It was a load bearing wall which was resupported and sistered, so now the kitchen and living room are one big open space. The kitchen had been re-sheetrocked recenty while the living room was old lightly textured ceiling. Where the main joint is where the sistering was done there is a bulge outward. Then the kitchen ceiling is higher up and uneven at the corners of the sheetrock and where the old and new sheetrock meet. The other area that was poorly jointed was a wall that was half old texture wall and new sheetrock. The new sheetrock isn't even with the old wall. If you look straight down the wall u can see straight down it untill the new sheetrock. Where that is there is an indentation and the wall is about an inch off being even and goes astray. The rest of the house has old lightly textured walls and could be brought back to smooth with the right knowledge and tools. I have worked with stucco, mortor, plaster and patching walls/building but I don't have any skim coating experience. I know that with a little direction and the right tools I can do anything that requires patience, good eye, and steady hands. I almost am starting to think that the only way to make the ceiling and the wall and doorway staight is to re sheetrock on top of the existing sheetrock and level each piece of sheetrock in place and do everything perfectly even and flat. I'm not sure how thin sheetrock comes but I think 1/2 inch is the thinnest so If I have to scarifice 1/2 inch of home space I will. It might save alot of sanding and skimming and sheetrocking a new layer might be quicker. But I would still have to skim coat the other walls in the home with texture. The texture isn't rough it would probably take 2 coats if I have the right equip and compound. The other possiblity I was thinking was if I do put a new layer of sheetrock, putting sound proof material instead, I saw some stuff here about a product that goes over the sheetrock maybe I could make my house a little more silent too If I am going to go threw the trouble of adding a layer of material over the sheetrock. That would be another good thing to know.
 
  #5  
Old 02-26-05, 05:12 AM
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From your description of the sheetrock work, I think you would be well advised to go ahead and shim where needed and then hang another layer of 1/2" board over the worst areas. If you've got more than like 1/4" difference in levels between the new rock & the old walls, skimmming that and getting it to hold up is going to be hard to do. If you were going to try that I'd suggest using a setting compound and build-up and feather out the seam slowly in thin layers. You'll have to feather it out at least 20"-24" to blend in that much of a bump and make it look good. That's gonna take alot of time & work & IMO shimming and overlaying is a quicker & easier option.

I'm picturing the old plaster walls in the house as being like a light coverage sand type texture on plaster & lath walls. You can use light joint compound, I use ProForm Light, made by National Gypsum, it's the premixed in either the blue box or 5 gal bucket with the blue lid. You will need to thin it with water down to like a soft serve ice cream consistency, use a 1/2" drill and mixer paddle. Use as wide a drywall knife as you're comfortable handling. Sounds like you've got some skills so I suggest a 14", that's what I use for skimming in open areas. Apply in thin layers get it as smooth as possible with the knife to avoid excessive sanding, two coats will generally cover most walls.

Prior to skimming you need to make sure all of the plaster is still bonded well to the lath, press on any suspect areas to make sure it doesn't push in with pressure applied to it. If there are any cracks remove all loose material and then you them with paper tape, specs say to always use All-Purpose compound taping, but I've run alot of tape with light w/o any problems. If there are any bad outside corners in the house I'd use a setting compound to repair these areas, this is the powdered compound that comes in a paper bag. It comes in anything from 15 min to 240 min formulas. The number reflects how long the product takes to set after it's mixed with water, I generally use 90 min on any sizeable project, 15 min if I'm just fixing a doorknob hole or something small.

Hope that answers all of your questions, post back if you've still got some.
 
  #6  
Old 02-26-05, 07:11 AM
patriots
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I agree the sheetrock will definatly save me a million hours of work. How much more expensive are the soundproofing boards, how thick are they, and what are they called? The walls you are picturing are slightly different in that the wall was built with a wire mesh and then covered by layers of either compond or plaster, I don't know. I live in florida and these type of walls are typical in old homes. The walls have a abstract layer of wall compound spread over them. I heard it's because no one here really knows how to make perfectly smooth walls. So it's a common stlyle in most older homes. Does it make any difference that the walls I will skim coat have a layer of primer I will try to get the name today for you, its a bacteria killing rx something???? I can't remember the guys at the depot recommended it to start before when I started to paint. Once I finished painting I realized there was no way to cover up with paint such horrible craftsmanship in the sheetrock and walls. I am still wondering if it's just easier to shim and put all new sheetrock or soundproofing everywhere and not to bother having to skim. Some walls are crooked and I want them all perfectly straight and smooth.
 
  #7  
Old 02-26-05, 02:58 PM
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You can primer before you skim the old walls, the mud will still stick w/o a problem. I'd just go with another layer of 1/2" rock over what's there, that Quiet Rock is better than $100 a sheet way to much $$ to spend on a wall IMO. What they've used is a diamond wire mesh under the plaster instead of wood lath which was more commonly here in the midwest in the days before drywall came about, still the same basic animal and the same techniques will work as I described. The anti mold primer would be an excellent idea given the climate in Fla. Keep us posted.
 
  #8  
Old 02-26-05, 08:53 PM
patriots
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thanks for the help I will write back and let you know how things work out.
 
 

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