Plastering with concrete


  #1  
Old 11-07-05, 01:26 PM
squire17
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Plastering with concrete

Hi there, I hope someone can help

I am wanting to plaster my kitchen with concrete. Has anyone got and avice about what type of concrete to use and is there anything I shouls be wary about. I will be plastering onto plasterboard which will be covered with a thin mesh to help the concrete adhere to it.

The type of concrete I am thining of is your bog standard concrete, with quite a smooth finish

Hope someone can help

Matt
 
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Old 11-07-05, 03:10 PM
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Have you ever heard or seen this done? There is no way the concrete I'm thinking of will work. Maybe you should try plaster instead.
 
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Old 11-07-05, 03:54 PM
M
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Sounds like you are thinking of stucco which is cement based [concrete has aggregate-stones] Even if you want a stucco look I believe you would be better off getting a similiar look with joint compound or plaster
 
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Old 11-08-05, 12:19 AM
squire17
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Here is a link to the type of concrete I am looking for, I am not even sure if it is concrete.

http://mocoloco.com/archives/000297.php
 
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Old 11-08-05, 06:02 AM
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The exterior looks like poured concrete, the interior doesn't look any different than plaster.

Personally I believe you would be better off with either plaster or a joint compound coating on the walls. A cement based finish would be fairly abrasive and unforgiving if you bumped into it. I believe you can get the same look with the softer plaster/mud and it would be a lot more occupant friendly.
 
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Old 11-08-05, 04:03 PM
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OK, You asked for it.
You can use Portland cement plaster. It is Portland cement, sand, not coarse aggregate and maybe some lime to make it more workable. It should be applied to your plasterboard about 1/2" thick and 3/4" is better in two coats plus a finish coat. Mesh is absolutely neessary. If you are going to hang it on mesh the mesh should be 2.5 metal lath and 3.4 is better or 20 ga 1" mesh woven wire and 17ga 1 1/2 in mesh is better. There are two ways to get a smooth finish. One is to use a factory prepared stucco finish called mission finish. It goes on after the second (brown) coat has cured a while. I saw it done thusly in Kenya about 15 years ago: the wall was browned and straightened then left somewhat rough under the straight edge. After the wall was fairly tight, near the end of the day the plasterers would mix up some neat Portland and water to about the consistency of thin batter and with a tin can fling that mixture against the set but still very green wall and then trowel it in with a steel trowel. It turned out almost as smooth as a plasterer in the states would leave whitecoat.
Now that brings me to the next idea. If you are after a smooth interior finish gypsum plaster with any of several kinds of smooth finish is sure easier.
If you are going to do it yourself it might be a little cheaper to use Portland and it might be a little more amateur friendly than plaster with a smooth finish.
That sounds contradictory doesn't it? As a plasterer, I can do either. I wouldn't bother with Portland cement plaster on an interior kitchen unless there were some other overpowering reason. I once did this very thing in the dish room in a commercial (dormatory) kitchen so they can steam clean it.

To put on a smooth plaster finish is not learned the first time you try it. And furthermore if you are putting it over plasterboard why not use blue board and veneer plaster?

Is there some other compelling reason to use cement?
 

Last edited by tightcoat; 11-08-05 at 04:09 PM. Reason: more info
  #7  
Old 11-14-05, 02:37 AM
squire17
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Wow, that certainly is a thorough answer, and a superb one at that. It has given me a lot of ideas.

I think we will be getting someone in to do it but over here in sweden it is hard to find plasterers that can do concrete. I can at least pass on this information to them.

Me and my partner are both Designers and so the reason to use concrete is to get a specific feel and atmosphere in the kitchen. I like the way it feels to the touch, quite cold in constrast to the warm kitchen.

That leads me onto another question I have about concrete. We are also having a concrete worktop built and once again we are finding it hard to find a solution to an undermounted sink.

Our builder says that it is quite difficult to undermount a sink to concrete. Do you have any tips on this. You seem to know what you are on about.

Thanks

Matt
 
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Old 11-14-05, 06:10 PM
T
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I am a plasterer and I don't know much about countertops. I did try one for myself once. I don't know how sinks are mounted underneath. I do have one thought. Maybe you can pour some screws or anchors in the concrete when you make the countertop, then use these to help mount the sink.
Let us know what you do and how it goes.
 
 

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