Taping a 45 degree angle


  #1  
Old 01-29-06, 07:38 AM
Johnny
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Taping a 45 degree angle

I have finished a lot of wallboard over my years and I have become quite confident and fairly quick at it. It's weird how some days I am able to achieve wonderful results and other days I have to fight it (just means more sanding).

I am preparing to finish an attic ceiling. The top is flat but both sides come down at a 45 degree angle following the roof down to the knee walls. In the past when I tape the 45's they always come out less than straight. I have seen lots of these angles done by other people and they are straight as an arrow. How do they get such straight results?

Thanks,
Johnny
 
  #2  
Old 01-29-06, 10:15 AM
M
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Johnny

The times I have seen the off angles with wavy tape it has been a by product of improper hanging. If the rock is hung with alternating laps I don't believe a straight finish tape job can be had. Applying the tape straight is imperitive as that is the line that the next coats of mud follow.

There are those that use a reinforced tape and finish it with a rubber/plastic knife which gives a rounded angle.

Hope this helps,
mark
 
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Old 01-29-06, 11:17 AM
Johnny
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Thanks Marksr,

I will be the one hanging the rock. The construction is new and there is R30 insulation installed. This insulation is bowing down conciderably and after first inspection I find it hard to find the clean angle in the rafters. I will be starting at the top and work my way down. I was thinking about rasping out my cuts to make an angle for a better fit but I may be looking for trouble. I also was thinking of putting factory edges together here to give me a mud valley but that may be looking for more trouble. How do the pro's go about this to give the finisher a nice straight line to begin with?

Thanks again,
Johnny
 
  #4  
Old 01-29-06, 07:27 PM
M
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I'm neither a pro hanger or finisher although I have done both for myself and friends. As a painter most of my drywall work was limited to repairs. Hopefully one of the pros will have time to answer.

I would think that if you took a few measurements and then cut all the boards the same width it would be easier to keep a straight line. Whether you use the factory beveled edge or a straight cut, they should all be the same for the length of the run.
 
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Old 01-30-06, 06:05 AM
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You need a good hanging job with a good framing job to get a good straight line. Use a product called "no coat". Can find it at drywall supply stores and some home depot's and lowes. It's a tape that is wide with plastic reiforcing. Bed it in all purpose mud and let dry completely before coating it. If you put enough mud under it it will come out nice and straight.
 
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Old 01-30-06, 02:49 PM
Johnny
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Thanks for the replys. I kinda thought there was something available that would help keep the line straight. Coops, I will look for "No Coat" but I haven't seen it at Lowe's.

Thanks,
Johnny
 
  #7  
Old 02-01-06, 08:08 AM
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My guy used that stiffer tape, forget what it was called. When he descr it to me, I was picturing something like a corner bead, but this tape is actually in a roll, and it is still paper, but just a lot stiffer. It turned out nice.

Good luck.
 
 

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