Blending in new drywall


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Old 02-02-06, 01:47 PM
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Blending in new drywall

On the walls of my bedrooms, the prior owner put a heavy paper cover over the entire area of the plaster walls. I guess it is the kind you put on walls to cover over cracks, like Nu-Wall. Anyway, due to some renovation, I am going to have a large patch in a wall of new drywall. What type of faux finish would you suggest to blend the new drywall into the rest of the wall. I guess what I am asking is how to match the texture so the new drywall is not so obvious.

thanks
 
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Old 02-03-06, 06:03 AM
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what texture is on the rest of the wall?
 
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Old 02-06-06, 05:32 AM
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Kind of like a very thin burlap clothlike texture.
 
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Old 02-06-06, 11:23 AM
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Sounds like instead of texture it is the repair paper used to hide all the cracks/defects in the wall. You can either try to add some of the same type paper to the new and hopefully have it blend in or the best fix would be to skim the whole wall with a thin coat of joint compound and then it woulld all be uniform.
 
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Old 02-08-06, 07:11 AM
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Okay. I've heard various takes on skim coating. Is joint compound okay to use? Should it be thinned? I've heard that plaster should be used to skim coat. We will be repainting the room once we are done.

Thanks.
 
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Old 02-08-06, 07:42 AM
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Plsater should go over plaster but since you will be going over the repair paper and new drywall, joint compound will work fine [easier to use IMO] Thinning the mud will make it easier to apply. You only need a thin layer of mud. It will be easier to just do one section at time but if you space out the sections you should be able to fill in the areas left out once you are done with the first round of sections. [hope that makes sense]

Once all the skim coat has dried, sand, check and repair as needed, dust and it is ready for primer.
 
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Old 02-19-06, 01:30 PM
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Mark,

Thank you for a very interesting post. I have a similar situation where I need to patch holes in a wall with old wallpaper. There is not much texture in the wallpaper and it is painted white. However, the wallpaper is bubbly because they did not use a primer when they painted it. I need some patches and blend it with new drywall, so old wallpaper and new drywall will show some differences.

I did not hear about "skim coating" before, but from what I read I just apply some drywall mud and sand it even? That would be amazing if I could have my walls smooth with that technique.

Would you apply primer on the wallpaper before applying the mud?

Thanks!
Ben
 
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Old 02-20-06, 09:52 AM
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Ben

If at all feasable remove the wallpaper. The more weight [paint and/or mud] that is added to the paper the more stress is put on the wallpaper adhesive. Since you already have areas that are bubbly it may remove fairly easy.
 
 

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