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impossible textured wall removal


berrybunches's Avatar
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03-29-06, 01:11 PM   #1  
impossible textured wall removal

Please let me know if I am in the wrong forum.
I live in the upsatirs of a cape cod. The walls are slanted as you may have guessed.
When I was young my parents used a "roller with holes in it" to create a terrible texture. Its very spikey, if you bump into it it will injure you and you will alot of the times bleed lol. But no joke. The spikes/holes are so deep it hard to hang a picture. It is all over the WHOLE wall.
The stuff they used to "spike" the walls reminds me dry wall my mother told me its called "Rough Stuff".
The walls under are dry wall. I really want to remove this texture but its so deep. A sander might do it but I'm afraid that it might damage the original dry wall. BTW it is painted over, the Rough Stuff is whitish colored and it wasnt intended to be a paint, the walls are now blue.
I would very much appreciate any help, I can't find anything on walls on the internet that are as textured as mine. I'm having a wall crises here people!
Thanks much in advance


Last edited by berrybunches; 03-29-06 at 01:26 PM.
 
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Annette's Avatar
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03-30-06, 06:54 AM   #2  
what are you wanting to do once you get rid of the texture? paint or wallpaper?

it sounds like they just used joint compound. if it's as deeply textured as you say, i would sand a little - just enough to knock down about half the texture. then i'd use more joint compound to fill in the remaining dips. use several thin layers. use a wrung out sponge to "sand" with, in between coats. you can get it silky smooth this way, or just "smooth enough" to paper over.

what were your parents thinking??????? treating those slanted wall areas like "wall" instead of "ceiling" will make the room seem taller & bigger, too. good luck!

 
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03-30-06, 08:10 AM   #3  
I would start by scraping the walls first, then sand [if effective] and then skim coat the wall with joint compound. As Annette said it may take a few coats depending on how deep the crevices are. If you don't have any high spots you can skip sanding until the final coat of mud.


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berrybunches's Avatar
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03-30-06, 09:33 AM   #4  
Apparently my walls had terrible blemishes all over them before and that was the reason for the texture-I don't know why they went that route.
As far as making my room feel taller and bigger as of now it feels like the walls are caving in on me.
Painting was the route I was going to take afterward and maybe to cut down some time and mess beadboard the bottom non slanted area of wall so it doesnt have to be smoothed. Would beadboard work on textured walls? I thought if I used a darker beadboard on the bottom half and a lighter paint on the top it would make the room feel more open...and since the walls slant I can't use a wall border for this effect. I figured also if I got a beadboard with a decorative raised out top (I don't know any tech. words lol) then the change from flat to slant would have a better feel and make more since. I
I'm a terrible decorator and have absolutly no style really lol so I figured I'd ask If this would work.
Thanks a whole lot for your help!

 
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03-30-06, 09:49 AM   #5  
chopping the wall in half with a dark bottom & light top will just further enhance the smallness & the "caving in" feeling. if you want the look of the beadboard, fine - but i would paint both the beadboard & the ceiling/wall area above it the same color (or a very similarly toned color, like 2 pastel colors or a pastel and white or cream, etc). the less contrast the better when trying to make a room look its biggest. also, cool colors recede and warm colors advance, so you may want to go with blues, greens, lavenders, etc. but any pastel/light color will be airy & open and reflect the most light.

 
marksr's Avatar
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03-30-06, 12:46 PM   #6  
I agree, if you make a small space busy or lots of contrast it will apppear smaller. If you need 2 colors, paint the ceiling and angles white and the short walls a light color. Using an off white or light pastel through out will help make the room appear larger.


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guest2's Avatar
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04-05-06, 10:35 AM   #7  
Please be careful about lead and/or asbestos. There is likely to be lead paint and it is possible that there is asbestos in the plaster or whatever they used to texture it. You can easily test for both I don't mean to be alarmist, but it is better to know what you are working with before you start tearing it down.

 
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