Old House, Need Help With Plaster....

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-28-06, 03:11 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 18
Old House, Need Help With Plaster....

Dear All:

Just bought an older home with lots of plaster. It's in reasonably good shape, but does have some hairline cracks, etc.. Are there any miracle cures for hairline cracks, and larger cracks in plaster? I had heard long ago that panty hose could be cut up and used as a tape over the crack. True??? After that, what is the best "mud" to use? Hot mud? Spackling compound? Normal mud????

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Mike.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-28-06, 03:54 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,788
I don't deal with plaster very often but when I do I usually use durabond to fill the hairline cracks after scratching them out a little with a putty knife/screwdriver.
 
  #3  
Old 12-28-06, 04:10 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 18
What is durabond??? Is that similar to liquid nails because I have tried a bit of that. he he ehh eh ehehe I used the loctite version and it seemed to nail things down very good prior to spakling... Any help would be appreciated!!!!

Mike.
 
  #4  
Old 12-28-06, 04:29 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,788
Durabond is a fast setting joint compound that comes in powder form [add water], there are different formulas with different drying times.
 
  #5  
Old 12-28-06, 05:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 18
Does it sand easier than spakling?
 
  #6  
Old 12-28-06, 05:30 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Euclid, Oh
Posts: 315
I've has a plaster house for many years. The best success I've had was real plaster (that you mix). I never tried Durabond, but heard its good.

Joint compound and spackling compound always had problems.

I rarely sand - because I use a damp sponge to smooth it before if hardens.
 
  #7  
Old 12-28-06, 06:04 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 18
I would be interested in learning how to do the damp sponge deal if you have any tips you could share... Will pick up some durabond tomorrow......
 
  #8  
Old 12-29-06, 04:49 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,788
Durabond dries hard and is also hard to sand so it should be applied neatly to reduce the need for sanding. Joint compound will respond to smoothing with a damp sponge, durabond will not! Although I suppose you could smooth it out some with a wet sponge before it dries as tribe_fan suggested.

If you completely fill the crack with durabond and pull your broad knife tightly over the repair, the need for sanding should be minimal.
 
  #9  
Old 12-29-06, 01:46 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 18
OUCH!!!!!! I already tried a big repair with durabond and tried the sponge deal - made a mess.... I will likely be sanding more.....
 
  #10  
Old 12-29-06, 02:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Euclid, Oh
Posts: 315
Sorry - you said small cracks first - what I meant was what marksr said. I only used a sponge very lightly to smooth the edges to match. Very lightly.

I think its better to use multiple coats for bigger holes. You really don't want to have to sand much.
 
  #11  
Old 12-30-06, 01:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 18
Well, I have plenty of both small cracks and gaping holes!!! LOL!!! I got a pleasant surprise today - my wife painted some proform (durabond by another name) that I considered a long way from being ready and it looked just as good as a spot that I had spent 2 days on with MULTIPLE coats of compound... I was shocked. I was expecting to spend another day on it!!!!! Apparently, things don't have to be perfect to look good!!!!!!!!!

Most importantly, thanks for all of your input!!!! The house is starting to look respectable.
 
  #12  
Old 01-12-07, 02:18 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 18
Thanks for the tip on the Durabond, it mixes and applies substantially better than what I was using previously. Another question for you... At what point do you have to use joint tape on a crack or repair??? Any help would be appreciated.
 
  #13  
Old 01-12-07, 03:44 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,788
Any cracks that you think may widen [or reappear] will benifit from tape. If any repair needs 2 coats of mud I usually use j/c for the 2nd coat - it's easier to sand
 
  #14  
Old 01-12-07, 05:38 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 18
Is there any specific size limit on the cracks??? I have put joint tape on hairline cracks before, but have also patched grenade holes without tape and they both seem to work out..... Confirmed on the JC for the 2nd coat for sure.
 
  #15  
Old 01-13-07, 05:21 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,788
Plaster is a different animal than drywall. With drywall you always want to tape any crack or hole [of any size] that is completely thru the drywall. Because of the differences in the make up of plaster I think you can pretty much disgard the tape except for when it is expected that the crack will widen or needs the extra support of the tape.

Again, I don't deal with plaster very often so my plaster knowledge is limmitted.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes