drywall questions???

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Old 02-11-07, 08:43 PM
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drywall questions???

Ok I have a problem.Im working in a home that is at least one hundred years old.The drywall guy before me had did a pretty messy and nasty job.A few questions.A few spots in the house are starting to turn brown in color where there was new drywall put up.This is a moisture problem right?If so do I just use kilz to go over it before applying any coat of paint?What is best should I use a drywall primer or can i just skim coat the entire thing when dealing with new drywall?What exactly is a skim coat?When I ask this it is because I have seen contractors who mix a few gallons of compound with a gallon of water and basically roll the stuff on the walls,calling it the skim coat!All that before painting of course.On drywall corner edges that are showing a little bit,should I go over it with a skim coat of compound before I paint?The edges of the metal bead is showing from the last person who sanded it.Does anyone know of anyway of detecting lead paint without hiring a professional to come out and do the testing?Do they make home kits for this kind of stuff(highly doubt it)?The last guy who drywalled managed to get the j/c all over the place!He made a real mess.It looks like he got more on the floo then on the walls themselves!Is there anybody who has used an industrial cleaner to get drywall compound/spackle off of hardwood floors.I'm going to sound lazy but i just dont want to spend a few days on my hands and knees with asponge scraping the stuff.
 
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Old 02-12-07, 05:12 AM
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First you should try and determine what caused the 'brown spots' and fix that first. If they are water stains use oil base kilz [or similiar] primer to seal the stain.

A slim coat is a thin layer of joint compound. Generally done when needing to hide multiple defects in a wall - when it's easier to mud the whole wall rather than individual defects.

Rolling on thinned down j/c is usually a method of texturing. It can be rolled on and then knifed/troweled off as a skim coat.

It doesn't hurt for the metal edge on corner bead to show. Paint will hide it. Attempting to cover it with j/c usually makes a mess plus the j/c is apt to get knocked off the edge later.

If the mud on the floors is joint compound - water will disolve and clean it up. Be sure to continually rinse your rag [or whatever] to keep from smearing the disolved j/c all over. If it is a setting compound it will be lot harder to remove - chipping and scrubbing works best.
 
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Old 02-12-07, 10:08 PM
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Hey Marksr,boy do we have a problem now!As I was saying about the brown spots on the ceiling and walls being a moisture problem?I was right,but the problem now is my boss decided to go ahead and paint the room.I objected to this earlier in the day but he just shrugged it off!Now there are alot of spots that have bubbled and I mean it took no more then ten minutes into rolling the room and they started to bubble.Im starting to think that its not drywall that it could be plaster and then they used drywall compound to smooth it out.Only problem being that there already was moisture on the plaster.So now I have an angry boss who wants an answer after I told him he shouldnt paint.I told him he may have to cut out the bubbles,seal/prime,spackle,sand and then repaint all of the problem areas.Does this sound like the correct method?
 
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Old 02-13-07, 12:47 AM
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Maybe those bubbles are wallpaper.

But that would mean the "drywall guy" just rollered mud onto wallpaper...?!

I give up.
 
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Old 02-13-07, 01:03 AM
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The building is a duplex and it would be a possibility except that I was told that it is all new drywall in the building.Lets say it is plaster and they wallpapered over it.Even if they had torn the wallpaper off the walls and ceiling they went over it with j/c or spackle.I think it is just a moisture problem.They should have sealed the drywall right after they finished it.The house is located in Maryland so the weather is changing consistently.Looks like the boss is going to have to take a loss on this one!
 
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Old 02-13-07, 07:18 AM
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I assume the bubbles are in the paper, either the drywall face paper or wall paper. There is a slight chance that the bubbles will lay back down when dry. More than likely they will need to be cut out, repaired, primed and painted as you already know.

If just the paint is bubbling there is a major adhesion problem
 
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