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HELP!: Tile Backsplash over damaged plaster


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05-05-07, 12:35 PM   #1  
HELP!: Tile Backsplash over damaged plaster

There was a small backsplash of 1x1 tiles under the window. I took those out, and when I get further along in my project, I will be doing a slate backsplash. My question is, do I need to cut the old plaster & 1/4" sheetrock out, and replace it, or can i simply fill the damaged area's with extra mortar, and tile over it how it is? I'm not worried about getting all the tiles exactly plum, becasue it is slate, which varies in thickness anyways. I just don't want tiles falling off the wall. Any help is greatly appreciated. Please view this picture of the damaged area, by copying and pasting the link into your browser's adress bar.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v206/Blakelpd5/windowdamage.jpg

 
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05-05-07, 01:13 PM   #2  
Is the plaster down to the brown coat?

You should be able to repair the wall sufficently to tile over it. I don't know that mortar would be a good filller. A drywall product like durabond might be better. There are a couple of plaster pros that frequent this forum so hopefully one of them will respond with a better answer.


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05-05-07, 05:18 PM   #3  
Thank you for your quick reply. I have looked around the forums quite a bit, and noticed how helpful you have been to many people marksr.

Back on topic,

Brown coat? What i see, is 1/4" sheetrock, that is about 2ft wide, run horizontally, then about 1/4" - 3/8" of plaster on top of that. The inside corners are reinforced with welded wire fabric, and the outside corners have square corner metal. Hope this helps! Thanks again.

 
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05-05-07, 06:16 PM   #4  
What you are calling "sheetrock" is gypsum lath. If USG made it it is RockLath. It became a generic name just like SheetRock.
Notice the "Rock". But I digress. Is the lath still present? If so you can use plaster to repair it. Make it all flush and flat and even with the rest of the walls. Then it should tile. If it is all pretty well gone then cut it out and replace it with Hardibacker board and tile.

 
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05-05-07, 08:04 PM   #5  
Well you learn something new every day! haha. Yes, the gypsum lath is still there. Just the top coat of plaster is gone. Where would I go about finding plaster? Also does plaster handle like Joint Compound? I will do a little searching around this site for Plastering tecniques, since I have never used it before. Thank you for your response.

 
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05-05-07, 09:06 PM   #6  
If only the top (finish?) coat of plaster is missing I don't think I'd bother. It's onoy 1/16" or so thick. Put the tile mastic on a little heavier or use thinset with a bit larger notches and let the stickum fill the gap.

 
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05-06-07, 11:05 AM   #7  
I'm sorry, as you can tell, I'm net to the whole plaster side of things.. I shouldn't of put "Top coat" in there... It is down to the lath in several spots..

 
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05-06-07, 05:15 PM   #8  
Ok then,

In my area Lowes and HD don't have the kind of stuff you really need. The easiest thing to use is Structo-Lite by USG or Gypsolite by Gold-Bond. From USG it can be had in 50# bags-- Way more than you need. I don't know if Gold-Bond has gone to smaller sized bags or not. You should use gypsum plaster not something with Portland cement because plaster will bond to plaster but Portland won't bond well. You know, If these are not very large areas you could use some setting joint compound. EasySand or the like. It will get hard, sets quickly acording to the number on the bag. 20 Min, 45 Min etc. As soon as it sets you can give it another coat until it is flush with the rest of the wall. If most of the backplash needs done this is a very expensive way to go but sometimes plaster can't be easiloy found and this can. In fact the more I think about it this might be the way to go. Structo-Lite and Gypsolite set very slowly and even though you can bring them flush with one coat. sometimes it sets not at all. And to tell you what to do to make it set is more than you really need.
Make sure it's setting type material!

 
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05-06-07, 11:11 PM   #9  
So your saying setting joint compound? Different the the drywall mud right? The drywall joint compoud I have used takes about 24 hrs to set. I don't know what the "setting" part in setting joint compound means. Thank you again.

 
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05-06-07, 11:14 PM   #10  
also, what type of store can I get this stuff at?

 
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05-07-07, 04:52 AM   #11  
A setting compound comes in a bag and mixes with water with a short/set work time. Easysand and durabond are the 2 most common brands. I always buy mine at the paint store but I think the big box stores sell it also. It shoud be in the same area as the ready mix buckets of joint compound.

j/c is water soluable and can be reused - not recomended for your application! Setting compounds are mixed as needed, any unused portion [mixed] must be disgarded.


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05-07-07, 07:11 AM   #12  
perfect! Now I've got a handle on this I think. Thanks you two!

-Blake

 
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05-07-07, 05:17 PM   #13  
hopefully my last question. I found (at lowes) a product called "plaster of paris" made by DAP. Am I on the right track?

Thanks again you two.

 
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05-07-07, 07:32 PM   #14  
Plaster of Paris sets so quickly that you probably won't even get it on the wall.
Now I could tell you how to retard it but that's more trouble than help. Look for
Joint compound in bags in the drywall section. They make some that sets in five minutes. 20 minutes, 45 minutes and 90 minutes. Five is probably too fast for you and ninety is probably longer than is necesarry but you could use that or 45.
Mix it with water to a little thinner than putty consistency and spread it on and then make it straight and flush.

 
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05-12-07, 01:21 AM   #15  
Ha! Thank you for your help. I found the Easysand at a local building supply store, and mixed up a batch. Never worked with it before, but it was kinda fun. I got the 45, and I could tell it was starting to thicken up in about 15 min. It is way stronger than I thought it would be. Thanks for the great advice.

 
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05-12-07, 08:41 AM   #16  
It's always nice when someone comes back to tell us what they did and how it worked.

 
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