Tape/mud under window trim?

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-07-07, 08:06 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 4
Tape/mud under window trim?

I've got some sheetrock joints at areas that are going to be covered by wood trim/moulding. Do I still need to tape and mud those joints?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-07-07, 09:14 AM
jatco's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 1,045
Taped and mudded would give you a better finish...for the trim.
I would...and have.
 
  #3  
Old 08-07-07, 12:40 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,821
You don't have to finish the areas that will be covered with wood BUT as mentioned above, the trim will set better on a smooth level surface.
 
  #4  
Old 08-07-07, 02:27 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,526
Fire codes usually require that all drywall joints be taped at a minimum, but they do not have to be finished. (no 2nd, 3rd coat required).
 
  #5  
Old 08-08-07, 10:48 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Illinois..........USA
Posts: 28
I too was wondering the same thing, thanks. Just framed in where old sliding door was, rotten sill, rim, sub & had to sister four joists! Back to the window...installed new const. pella. What should I use for interior jamb? From window to flush with drywall measures 3". Is there a kit available? 24" x 38" rough opening. Just applied first coat of mud, just thinking ahead...Thanks
 
  #6  
Old 08-08-07, 02:13 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,526
When the exact wall thickness is known beforehand, and the window is ordered this way, Pella actually nails a narrow jamb extension onto the window with crown staples. But there's nothing special about it- unlike Andersen, Pella has no tongue and groove extension jamb. You could probably order something but you'd flip at the cost. So I'd recommend that you make your own. Since you've already got the window installed, you only have 2 options. Make your own jamb and either push the extension jamb against the window and nail the extension jamb to the sides of the rough opening, or if there is enough room between the jamb and the rough opening, pocket screw the extension jamb onto the existing window using a 6" long #2 square drive pocket screw driver bit. (you need about 3/8" of room between the extension jamb and the rough opening to do this.)

If it is easy to remove the window, the nicest thing to do would be to take the window out, pocket screw the extension jamb onto the window, then reinstall the window. But I'm guessing that's not an option.

To use pocket screws, you'd obviously need a pocket hole jig and step bit (Kreg's is best) and a box of 1 1/4" coarse pocket screws (Lowe's has these).

The wood you'd want to use would preferably be Douglas fir. The Lowe's around here carry nice Doug Fir 1x6's which can be ripped to size. If that's not available, #1 pine will also work just fine. I just feel that if you are staining the wood, Douglas fir looks better than pine does for about the same price.

You mentioned that the jamb needs to be about 3", but you might want to check every corner of the window to double check those measurements. Sometimes the window will be whacked out and needs to be pushed in or out a little so that your extension jamb can have all sides of equal width. To figure out how big to make the extension jamb, you'll want to measure the interior edge of the window and plan to leave a strong 1/8" reveal (reveal = a step where 2 pieces of trim meet) where the extension jamb will meet the window. I nail the extension jamb together in the shape of a box, making sure that it will leave that 1/8" reveal once it's assembled. Then take the whole box and install it into the opening. I prefer to have the jamb be "just below" the drywall surface, rather than perfectly flush or slightly proud.

If you have to nail the extension jamb to the rough opening, (rather than using pocket screws) you'll want to shim the extension jamb in place with shims at each corner, and center it on the window to leave that 1/8" reveal. Push it tight against the window and nail it to the rough opening. If you decide to add some glue, don't get any on the wood where it will show!!! Or the wood won't accept stain.
 
  #7  
Old 08-09-07, 09:56 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Illinois..........USA
Posts: 28
Thank You very much! That's what I needed to know. Actually I can remove window, temp install at this time. Have to remove for wood siding install, going to be a little tricky. First sheet, install window permenant....while sliding the siding into j-channel then next sheet. With this method, not sure if having jamb allready on window will be option or not? Will probably opt for fab after install. Didn't intend on highjaking this thread.......but thanks anyway!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes