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repairing drywall


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08-16-07, 09:49 PM   #1  
repairing drywall

how do I repair this

http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/4707/dcp1658km0.jpg

http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/1379/dcp1657pg8.jpg

http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/9071/dcp1656fp3.jpg

would using plaster work or do I need to put a patch. the furnace is right behind that wall

 
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08-17-07, 05:01 AM   #2  
It would be best to cut out the damaged portion and insert a new piece of drywall, tape and finish. The easiest way to replace a portion is to cut it out to the studs on each side, nail in a new 2x to the studs and attach the patch to it. You can also screw in a piece of wood above the cut out leaving 1/2 of it below where the 2 pieces of drywall meet to further secure the patch.


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08-17-07, 05:47 PM   #3  
would Gypsum Board be OK.
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100322690

 
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08-18-07, 04:44 AM   #4  
I couldn't get the link to work

I assume gypsum board is the same as drywall/sheetrock. It comes in several different thickness's with 1/2" being the most common = what you probably have - check first to know for sure.


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08-18-07, 05:20 AM   #5  
from the link

Regular Gypsum Board is a gypsum core board that is fire resistant and surfaced with paper on front/back and long edges. With its natural properties, it is durable yet easy to repair. In addition, gypsum wallboard’s fire resistance and sound control capabilities further demonstrate its desirability in building systems.

* Lightweight and easy to handle for speedy installations
* Lends itself to creative shaping in interior surfaces allowing for maximum design flexibility
* Durable yet easy to repair
* Takes virtually any decoration from paint, textures to wallpaper
* Surfacings on both faces and on the long edges are 100% recycled paper
* MFG Brand Name : ToughRock® Moisture-Guard®
* MFG Model # : 74
* MFG Part # : 74

mines 1/4 inch thick thats why its damaged not broken

 
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08-18-07, 03:08 PM   #6  
Are you in a mobile home? they usually have 1/4"

A patch would be better than filling/fixing what you have with joint compound and tape. I doubt you can find 1/4" at a big box store but any drywall supply house will have it.


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08-18-07, 05:37 PM   #7  
How do I plaster a wall

Should you need to re-plaster then you may find this website useful

Diy Video Tutorials

http://www.grahamvideos.co.uk

Hope this helps
Sarah Love

 
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08-18-07, 07:26 PM   #8  
Posted By: marksr Are you in a mobile home? they usually have 1/4"

A patch would be better than filling/fixing what you have with joint compound and tape. I doubt you can find 1/4" at a big box store but any drywall supply house will have it.


home depot had 4 foot by 8 feet sections of 1/4 inch drywall for around $8 a sheet and its HEAVY had to have it cut in half to fit in the minivan. the damaged area is 16 inchs by 17inchs.

 
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08-19-07, 10:04 PM   #9  
ok I was going to the cut away the drywall about 1 inch above the hole and then cut it to the left and right until I get to the studs. then add a extra 2x4 to the side stud so I can screw the new drywall to it. then cut the new drywall sheet to fit the size of the hole with a circular saw.is that ok.

 
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08-20-07, 04:39 AM   #10  
It would be better to cut the drywall with an utility knife. Score the front side of the drywall, bend it and then cut the paper on the back side. A hand saw will also work. While drywall can be cut with a skil saw the dust created is enormous


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08-24-07, 10:49 PM   #11  
Posted By: marksr It would be better to cut the drywall with an utility knife. Score the front side of the drywall, bend it and then cut the paper on the back side. A hand saw will also work. While drywall can be cut with a skil saw the dust created is enormous
can it be cut with a jigsaw and a shop vac hooked up as my jigsaw can by used with a bag

 
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08-25-07, 04:45 AM   #12  
I don't recall ever using a jig saw to cut drywall but it should do ok, with or without the dust collector.


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02-22-09, 02:01 AM   #13  
ok still havn't fixed that yet. is a framing nailer a good tool for nailing new studs to the old for drywall. will get to it this spring.

 
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02-22-09, 03:58 AM   #14  
A framing nailer should work fine to attach the new 2xs although hammer and nail will work too. Whne adding nailers[using hammer], sometimes it's benificial to sink the nails into the nailer before setting it place.


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02-22-09, 09:27 AM   #15  
...or just screw your new studs to the original ones.
Less physical work and stronger..(presuming you have a drill - cordless or not).

 
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02-24-09, 03:02 AM   #16  
i'll have to pick up a new multy speed drill as the current one has a broken trigger. so the only working drill i have is a single speed one.or i use a air ratchet with a screw driver bit.

 
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02-24-09, 06:30 PM   #17  
If you dont want to spend any money on tools.. just use your single speed drill to drive most of the screw in, then just tighten that up manually. You'll be good to go..!

 
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02-28-09, 03:13 AM   #18  
Posted By: jatco If you dont want to spend any money on tools.. just use your single speed drill to drive most of the screw in, then just tighten that up manually. You'll be good to go..!
the single speed drill is like 1500 RPM. a 19V cordless multy speed drill is around 37 so will get that later.

 
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04-18-09, 05:30 PM   #19  
its fixed. its not pretty but its done. just needs allot of sanding and painting. i did use drywall joint tape a wire mesh kind self sticking.I nailed to new studs to the existing studs to give me something to nail the drywall the too. I just nailed the drywall to the studs instead of using screws. used the framing nailer for both. now sense i got the wrong size drywall 1/4 instead of 1/2 inch i just cut both pieces together and doubled it up to make a 1/2 inch using a circular saw with a metal cut off wheel. Made ALLOT of dust good thing i cut it outside.



Last edited by flirty1; 04-18-09 at 07:24 PM.
 
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