ceiling cracks in kitchen.. help

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  #1  
Old 11-11-07, 09:39 AM
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ceiling cracks in kitchen.. help

Hi..

I have a crack in my kitchen ceiling that forms a rectangle in a corner area of the room. The crack is fairly fine, and doesnt appear to be getting bigger beyond the 3ft it akes up now.
My house was built in the 50's and I am embarrassed to say but I am not 100% sure if the ceiling is plaster or drywall, I know the walls are plaster though.
I am wondering of anyone knows the easiest way to repair the crack. Is it as simple as mudding, sanding and re-painting?

Please advise when you can

Thank you
 
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  #2  
Old 11-11-07, 01:15 PM
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Add some paper tape when you mud and the likelihood of it cracking again goes down.
 
  #3  
Old 11-12-07, 03:48 AM
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..... or if it's plaster, scratch out the crack a little an apply a setting compound like durabond. Tape is still probably better but durabond is quicker/easier
 
  #4  
Old 11-12-07, 02:47 PM
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If it forms a rectangle, I would bet it was a repair or something was removed and patched. If the walls are plaster so would the ceiling. First go around the crack and push with your hand to see if there is any movement. If there is...this was a repair of some sort. If movement I would try to install drywall screws on both sides of the crack/s. Then I would take a razor utility knife and cut out some of this crack if not put the razor completely through it. Then use paper tape with durabond behind it all around the crack. Then after dry apply two more coats of easy sand to hide.

Good Luck
 
  #5  
Old 12-13-07, 01:22 PM
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Question Didn't want to start a brand new thread --

I have to hurry up and paint a bedroom... And there are some *&^%ing cracks in the walls and ceiling. I think they were just masked by paint last time and after a wisconsin thaw and freeze they have unhinged themselves again.

I don't know what it's called, but it's 1950's concrete plaster smeared over what seems to be like thin sheetrock. The stuff is like concrete to work with. I'm not going to have enough room to feather this out enough for new tape, I can't get a razor to cut through it, only some chisels. If I "v" it till I can see the other side, will Durabond do the trick??

Luckily I'm going to do some kind of rag-rolling or sponging so that will help with texture variances, but I don't want the stupid cracks to reopen again. I hate this house
 
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Old 12-13-07, 03:07 PM
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Sounds like durabond would be the way to go
 
  #7  
Old 12-13-07, 05:21 PM
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So these cracks come and go with the weather then. In cases like this you have to tape also. And even then, this may cause new cracks to form outside the taped areas. Not much more you can do as it sounds like something wants to give here.
 
  #8  
Old 12-13-07, 08:06 PM
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not exactly sure when they got there or why. I hadn't used my upstairs for about 7 years because I was here alone and just didn't need the space. Now I'm moving back up there and I have these cracks. One has efflorescence which makes me nervous, but the others look like lines across where the sheets may have ended/began.

yay
 
  #9  
Old 12-13-07, 09:11 PM
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yeah, it almost sounds like deflection from undersized floor/ceiling joists. Probably will be a recurring problem even if you fix it right. Tape would be the best way to prevent minor cracks from reappearing. If you don't want to go to all that work and lose your texture, have to try to match it, as a second best option, you could try your idea about notching the crack, then caulk it (wipe it flat) if you think the paint texture will hide the caulk. (you'd obviously never want to do that on a smooth white ceiling!) At least the caulk would stretch over a crack that keeps wanting to open, right?
 
  #10  
Old 12-14-07, 03:26 AM
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I have used caulk to repair plaster cracks before. I've even applied a 2nd layer of caulk, dabbed with a sponge to help mimic the texture. 95% of the time it looks decent. I don't know how well it holds up as I've never done it on my own residence - but I've never been called back to fix it the correct way either - mostly done on rentals or homes for sale
 
  #11  
Old 12-14-07, 09:02 PM
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That 1950's plaster was the very best. You need a brand new razor blade. Exacto or utility knife to cut a v into the crack. I use a Makita mini circular diamond blade tool to cut into a large amount of this stuff. A step further is screws on both sides of the crack if possible. Then Durabond and PAPER TAPE with two more coats to smooth.
 
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