bad wallpaper removal... HELP!!!

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  #1  
Old 04-30-08, 09:51 PM
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bad wallpaper removal... HELP!!!

We recently bought a place from an old woman that passed on. She had wallpaper in the kitchen and bathrooms- silver wallpaper on the walls AND on the ceilings. Here's our problem:
We removed the wallpaper ... and skipping those details, our ceilings especially, but some spots on the walls also have these deep looking gash marks- like ridges or indentations. These look like a kid took something blunt and pressed into soft wood to carve their name or soemthing, except it is extremely noticeable. We've tried putting some lightweight compound in the spots, but there are so many spots, that we are basically putting compound everywhere and the ceilings are extremely difficult to do and it's hard to get it smooth on the ceiling, even after sanding afterwards.

The question is what is best to do now?
1. Do we continue to put compound, sand and prime before we paint?
2. Can we patch with something without cutting and putting new drywall in place? Something like that wire mesh patch for larger holes?
3. Is there something we can apply over the walls/ ceiling like a very thin piece of drywall or similar that we adhere to the existing wall/ celing (via glue since we only need something lightweight, not a new wall for supporting things), or nailing a new wall over the existing one?

We have an extremely limited budget, so hiring professionals is our last resort. The compounding is a lot of work and hasn't looked good so far, so we are desperate for another option!!
 
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  #2  
Old 05-01-08, 05:00 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

#1 - yes but joint compound would be better than spackling. it isn't uncommon to need to skim coat a wall/ceiling after a tough wallpaper removal. Repairs should always be sanded, dusted and primed.

#2 - How big are the holes? Tiny holes can be filled, pencil size to 50 cent piece size need tape embedded in mud or the fiberglass sticky mesh tape covered with joint compound.

#3- You can laminate over the wall with new drywall [any thickness] but it will need to be finished like new drywall and it may alter how the woodwork and electrical devices fit.

IMO skim coating is the best/cheapest option. It does take a little practice but should be doable for most diyers. Basically you apply a thin coat of mud over the drywall, sand when dry, touch up as needed, sand, prime and paint.
 
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Old 05-01-08, 08:16 PM
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Sounds like you have a disaster to deal with. I need to see this room for the best advice. But two to three coats of joint compound at the minimum is what you need to do. Maybe a complete skim coat over every square inch on the walls and ceiling. If there are large holes this requires drywall and paper tape. Upload pics at " photobucket.com ".
 
  #4  
Old 05-10-08, 01:28 PM
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We don't have a digital camera right now to post pics, but the multiple layers of lightweight joint compound with sanding is what we were doing. The problem is that we are novices and our sanding remains uneven, even after sanding.

The holes are no holes actually, but more like indentations. They don't need tape, but there are literally that many of them that spot covering with compound takes just as long as doing the whole ceiling.

I guess skim coating is it, but the laminate thing sounds interesting and a lot less messy (we have a toddler and the sanding can be messy). Any idea where I can find out more about this option?
 
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Old 05-10-08, 04:14 PM
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How are you sanding? Holding sandpaper in your hand doesn't work well, most of us use a sanding pole but even a block of wood to hold the sandpaper flat will work.

You can also use a stiff wet sponge to smooth out joint compound. The moisture partially disolves the j/c allowing you to spread it around leveling it out. There is no sanding dust with this method but it works best if the j/c is applied neatly. But sanding does give the best results.

Basically laminating over the drywall with another layer of drywall is the same as hanging drywall over bare studs. You do have to use longer nails/screws to secure it to the stud. Electrical boxes must have extensions installed to make them safe and because the room is slightly smaller, all the woodwork will need to be adjusted to fit.
 
  #6  
Old 05-10-08, 09:45 PM
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I'm the last person to give advice, so I'll just say I'll mention this in passing...

I read an ad in our paper's Saturday "Homestyle" section about rolls of fiberglass covering that's SUPPOSED to be for this kind of problem.

Anyone ever heard of this?

Ken Allthumbs
 
  #7  
Old 05-11-08, 06:00 AM
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I don't know a lot about it but there is a type of 'wallpaper' covering that can be applied over bad walls and then painted. The main place I've seen it used is on old plaster that had lots of cracks.
 
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Old 05-11-08, 08:55 AM
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I read an ad in our paper's Saturday "Homestyle" section about rolls of fiberglass covering that's SUPPOSED to be for this kind of problem.

Anyone ever heard of this?

Ive heard of it and used it. It is nothing new on the market. The only problem with it was the inconsistancy of the rolls. The glue would sometimes tear the fiberglass apart and shred it leaving threads sticking out all over the place. Sometime's a roll would be overglued and wouldnt even roll out. The edge of the rolls would also frey. It was also used for exterior stuccoing on durarock and is a bit heavier & thicker than drywall fiberglass.

What we use now when skimcoating is plastic Stucco mesh. Its almost the exact same appearance as fiberglass mesh without the glue and it is stronger than fiberglass. It comes in different widths and lengths. You can get 4ft wide rolls up to around 200 ft lengths.

You would first put the mud on and then imbed the mesh into it keeping the mesh tight to the surface being skimcoated on the first coat.

For the original post, I think your putting the mud on too heavy. Keep it tight to the surface and let it build up on its own after the 2nd & 3rd coats. Sand lightly in between coats.
Trowel over the entire area. Do not do it in patchs or it wont blend in. Easier said than done........good luck.
 
  #9  
Old 05-11-08, 03:17 PM
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Thanks for all the suggestions...
We'll do our best!
 
  #10  
Old 05-11-08, 05:38 PM
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Originally Posted by randy63 View Post
Do not do it in patchs or it wont blend in.
Actually that's how I first learned to skim coat - in a checkerboard pattern. I'd skim coat every other square and then go back and fill in the 'blanks' when dry, sand and it would look good - maybe a little minor touch up. Of course this is assuming all the repairs are made first!
 
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